Let’s learn Sor’s Opus 60 together, shall we?

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Jorge Oliveira
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Re: Let’s learn Sor’s Opus 60 together, shall we?

Post by Jorge Oliveira » Fri Jul 07, 2017 6:00 pm

Yisrael van Handel wrote:
Fri Jul 07, 2017 11:36 am
Here is Opus 60 #11. I notice that in each exercise, Sor introduces a new technical issue. That is one of the nice things about these exercies, they give you a lot of techniques one at a time. The two challenging aspects of this exercise were:
  1. Controlling the articulation
  2. Maintaining concentration when playing the same figure over and over in the second part.
I listened to recordings on YouTube, and they sounded messy to me because open strings were left playing far past their time, which made a muddled impression. I have tried to damp open strings when necessarily. Especially the open 4th string needs careful attention. Sor wrote exactly how long to hold each note. In the second section, I had to concentrate very hard with all those repetitive figures. Very easy to skip one or play one too many.Sor_Op60_#11.wma
Please comment. I know I stumbled in one place, but I liked the tone of the recording and the general effect, so I am posting anyway. If I make another recording, I will stumble somewhere else.
Yes, lovely tone and steady rhythm, Yisrael, congratulations. And you are right, in each of these compositions there is always something new one must pay attention to. Most of the times I'm struggling with the rests and dotted notes. I was not used to these little things and I'm sure most of times I'm not strictly obeying them... :(.

As you say, in the second part the figures are often repeated. In order to memorize them, I assigned each a sequential number and pencilled it on top of each group of three notes. If you do that you will see that there are only six distinct groups of three notes (figures) which are played in isolation or repeated two, tree or four times along the section (see following picture, please).
Sor Opus 60 #11 Msr 17-32.jpg
Once you work the structure of this section, memorizing it becomes easy.

One more thing. It looks to me that, in measure 22, you are playing its last note as an F instead of a D. Please check.

With this new entry of yours, the table of posted pieces is now the following:
Sor's Opus 60 recorded pieces as of 07Jul17.png
Edited to include the table above.
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Last edited by Jorge Oliveira on Sat Jul 08, 2017 1:21 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Aria A558, 655 mm, Cedar, 1987, Nagoya, Japan
Hermanos Camps Master, 650 mm, Cedar, 2014 (Nº 3), Spain

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Jorge Oliveira
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Re: Let’s learn Sor’s Opus 60 together, shall we?

Post by Jorge Oliveira » Fri Jul 07, 2017 6:27 pm

Yisrael van Handel wrote:
Fri Jul 07, 2017 11:48 am
Jorge Oliveira wrote:
Fri Jul 07, 2017 11:16 am

Well, it took me more than "a few days" to prepare Sor's Opus 60 #5 with no wrong notes. So, I'm now posting now a revised version of Sor's Opus 60 #5 for you all to listen to and comment. <snip>
Sorry I did not respond immediately. Apparently we were both recording at the same time. Very nice. Good tone, nice phrasing, the whole piece made good musical sense. Measures 23 and 24 were a little rushed the first time through. This is not serious, but I just want to prove to you that I listened very carefully to every note several times. I am very much enjoying your progress. Keep up the good work. Your control is improving, even at this quite brisk pace.
Many thanks for your nice words and encouragement, Yisrael. My first version of the #5 had indeed some wrong notes. It was my good friend Monique (she lives in Delft, Holland) who had called my attention for them and I had promised myself to correct them on a subsequent post. As, in order not to forget them :), I keep on playing, every day, all the already learned pieces of Opus 60, together with the one I happen to be learning at any given time, I eventually end up playing them better than at the time of their posting. So, yes, now I can play the #5 faster than before, although still with mistakes here and there, depending on the time of the day and whether my fingers are sufficiently warmed up :D.
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Re: Let’s learn Sor’s Opus 60 together, shall we?

Post by powderedtoastman » Sun Jul 09, 2017 2:55 am

Jorge Oliveira wrote:
Sat May 27, 2017 7:39 pm
I'm posting Sor's Opus 60 #12 for you all to listen to and comment. As usual, the record was produced with the Zoom Handy Recorder app on my iPhone, the sound capture being made by an iRig microphone that connects directly to the iPhone. The guitar used was my Hermanos Camps Master with Konobloch Actives Carbon CX, High Tension strings (4,5 months old already, but still going ok, I think). The resulting .wav file was then processed with the Audacity audio editor on Windows 10 to produce the .wma file below. My impressions of this piece are, as usual, in green:

Sor’s Opus 60, Nº 12. Learning period: 09May17 - 27May17 Comment: Except for the counterpoint in measures 19-21 - the most difficult part to bring up to speed (around 1/4 = 65 bpm) - this composition is not difficult to play. Nevertheless, it took me three weeks to have it ready to post, one week more than I thought I would need.
Sor, Fernando - Opus 60 #12 (V1).wma


So, now, the table of posted studies is the following:

Sor's Opus 60 recorded pieces as of 27May17.png

My next self-assignment is to post a sound file of the #13 study.
Hi Jorge! Awesome that you are doing this. I am fairly actively studying Op. 60 as well as other Sor Studies, though I like to jump around a bit between these and the other "big 4" composers.
At any rate I have some comments for you for number 12. (Edit: typed 13, meant 12)
First and foremost, nice job! It's a tricky one.

For me one of the most important things in the first section of this piece is the separation of the voices.
In the second measure (not counting the initial pick up note as a measure) where the lower voice comes in on the offbeat... I recommend using the thumb for that even though it's on the second string, and I say don't be too shy with that voice, since that's where the motion is at that moment!
That may help to make it sound like it's coming from a second guitar entirely. Also practice the voices separately, and if you have a friend to play with, try making a duet out of it as a fun exercise. I think that will open up your ears to something a little more that you can squeeze out of this piece.

And my other comment is 10 measures into the second section (once again not counting the pick up note as a measure), the lower voice is a half note C on the third string. Be sure to hold that for the whole measure!

Other than that just keep up the great work!

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Re: Let’s learn Sor’s Opus 60 together, shall we?

Post by powderedtoastman » Sun Jul 09, 2017 3:20 am

You inspired me to do a quick take of number 12 to hopefully demonstrate my points. I like to really emphasize those four lower voice notes starting with the C, and if I do it right (which I don't every time) they really chime out and sound like a separate entity from the uppers.. I think I managed to achieve that effect a couple times here but not every time.. but I'll let you be the judge.
Hope you enjoy!!


Youtube

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Re: Let’s learn Sor’s Opus 60 together, shall we?

Post by Jorge Oliveira » Sun Jul 09, 2017 2:04 pm

powderedtoastman wrote:
Sun Jul 09, 2017 2:55 am
Jorge Oliveira wrote:
Sat May 27, 2017 7:39 pm
I'm posting Sor's Opus 60 #12 for you all to listen to and comment...
Hi Jorge! Awesome that you are doing this. I am fairly actively studying Op. 60 as well as other Sor Studies, though I like to jump around a bit between these and the other "big 4" composers.
At any rate I have some comments for you for number 12. (Edit: typed 13, meant 12)
First and foremost, nice job! It's a tricky one.

For me one of the most important things in the first section of this piece is the separation of the voices.
In the second measure (not counting the initial pick up note as a measure) where the lower voice comes in on the offbeat... I recommend using the thumb for that even though it's on the second string, and I say don't be too shy with that voice, since that's where the motion is at that moment!
That may help to make it sound like it's coming from a second guitar entirely. Also practice the voices separately, and if you have a friend to play with, try making a duet out of it as a fun exercise. I think that will open up your ears to something a little more that you can squeeze out of this piece.

And my other comment is 10 measures into the second section (once again not counting the pick up note as a measure), the lower voice is a half note C on the third string. Be sure to hold that for the whole measure!

Other than that just keep up the great work!
Glad to have you back to this topic, powderedtoastman, and many thanks for your encouraging words. Thanks also and for listening to my rendition of Sor's Opus 60 #12 - a tricky one, indeed :) - and for calling my attention to some of its details. Indeed, I have the Chanterelle edition of Sor's Complete Studies and in it, in the 2nd measure of Opus 60 #12, all three notes of the lower voice are to be played with the thumb (just as you say it should be), but in my rendition I used the m and i for the first two, the C and the A, respectively, and the thumb only on the third one, the open G. I did a quick experiment, playing as you said, and, indeed, it is a totally different sound, the lower voice comes up fully and quite separate. And the same goes for the lower voice in measure 6 - again, I was using the thumb only in the last open G :). Your other observation, the holding of the half note C for the whole measure 18 (the 10th in section 2), yes, you are right, I missed it completely :oops:. And, I noticed now, in the previous measure, the 17th, there is also a small detail - the open B in the first beat is a quarter note and should not be left ringing during the whole measure, it should be dumped almost immediately after being plucked, no?

Any way, as in my fist rendition - you may have noticed - I missed entirely the last D in measure 12 (the 4th in section 2), I promised myself to post a second version of the #12. I'll do it in one of these days and will incorporate your observations. Thanks again! :)
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Re: Let’s learn Sor’s Opus 60 together, shall we?

Post by Jorge Oliveira » Sun Jul 09, 2017 2:46 pm

powderedtoastman wrote:
Sun Jul 09, 2017 3:20 am
You inspired me to do a quick take of number 12 to hopefully demonstrate my points. I like to really emphasize those four lower voice notes starting with the C, and if I do it right (which I don't every time) they really chime out and sound like a separate entity from the uppers.. I think I managed to achieve that effect a couple times here but not every time.. but I'll let you be the judge.
Hope you enjoy!!


Youtube
Thanks for your rendition of the #12, powderedtoastman, I could see, fully, what you meant in your previous post. A few comments, only:
  1. In the first three measures of section 2 I play the first six higher voice notes on the second string and only then I move to the first string (starting with the A in the 5th fret). The transition becomes more fluid, I think.
  2. I noticed in your video that you dump the open eight B in the first beat of measure 5. I missed this one as well, I have to incorporate it.
  3. In your video you are using a small guitar, looks like a replica of a medieval instrument. Are you using gut strings, no? The pitch is lower... What is the length of the fretboard?
  4. I invite you to post in this Topic all od Sor's Opus 60 pieces you already play for us all to see/listen. It would enrich the Topic, I'm sure.
  5. Finally, I've added an entry for you in the table of posted recordsbelow.
Sor's Opus 60 recorded pieces as of 09Jul17.png
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Hermanos Camps Master, 650 mm, Cedar, 2014 (Nº 3), Spain

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Re: Let’s learn Sor’s Opus 60 together, shall we?

Post by powderedtoastman » Sun Jul 09, 2017 3:39 pm

Jorge Oliveira wrote:
Sun Jul 09, 2017 2:46 pm

Thanks for your rendition of the #12, powderedtoastman, I could see, fully, what you meant in your previous post. A few comments, only:
  1. In the first three measures of section 2 I play the first six higher voice notes on the second string and only then I move to the first string (starting with the A in the 5th fret). The transition becomes more fluid, I think.
  2. I noticed in your video that you dump the open eight B in the first beat of measure 5. I missed this one as well, I have to incorporate it.
  3. In your video you are using a small guitar, looks like a replica of a medieval instrument. Are you using gut strings, no? The pitch is lower... What is the length of the fretboard?
  4. I invite you to post in this Topic all od Sor's Opus 60 pieces you already play for us all to see/listen. It would enrich the Topic, I'm sure.
  5. Finally, I've added an entry for you in the table of posted recordsbelow.
Sor's Opus 60 recorded pieces as of 09Jul17.png
Thanks for the comments! I will take a look at your fingering to start the second section but I think I can imagine what you mean because there is a position shift there that you have to do pretty quickly if you want to make it smooth. And the last section ends on an open G so there's time to set up. I'm not sure about the G at the end of the second section when taking the repeat, but we shall see!

Thank you for pointing out how I'm stopping the open eighth note B, I don't know if I made the conscious decision on that one so I think I may have gotten lucky to have formed that habit! In fact it looks like I may even just be muting the B as a side effect to muting the D from the lower voice.
This brings up an interesting point that it is good to strive to play every note to its written time value, but at the same time I think it's perfectly OK to take liberties on that for artistic effect or even technical facility, in some situations. On one hand having that rest right in the middle of the measure rather than calling out a dotted quarter note seems like a pretty explicit instruction, but that B doesn't clash with the G that follows, so I would not worry about it too much.
Sometimes the score calls for holding out a note that seems just impossible given what comes after it. At some point I am quite willing to accept letting go a fraction early to get to what comes next.

I do strive to mute strings with my right hand when it makes sense to do so, but watching myself play, I see my left hand very quickly stepping in to do the job in some cases. I also wasn't really fully aware I had developed that habit so much, so that's a benefit of recording quick videos like this to review!

As for my guitar, it's not medieval, but a replica of a romantic guitar (Lacote c. 1830 I think) so not too different from what Sor himself might have played, I believe the scale length is 620 but it may also possibly be closer to 630.
It's a "student" model from Scot Tremblay who is a member here though I don't know if he posts much lately. He does post on facebook once in a while. I don't use gut strings, I did try them once but didn't care much for the texture and how they jive with my nails. So I compromise and use nylgut. So far I've stuck with Aquila Alabastro, but at a friend's recommendation I am planning to try a set of Ambra soon. And yes, I like to tune down a little bit, though I'm not perfectly consistent about what pitch I shoot for. Somewhere comfortably between 440 and half-step down. It gets me a little sweeter sound and the strings have a little more give to them that way.

Will be happy to post in the other topic!

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Re: Let’s learn Sor’s Opus 60 together, shall we?

Post by powderedtoastman » Sun Jul 09, 2017 5:41 pm

I'm late to the party but I might as well try to cover all the ground, since I am invested in this opus as well!

Here's my contribution for #1:


Youtube


#2:

Youtube


And #10!

Youtube


No. 1 I am fairly happy with how it's come out but there's always room for more dynamics and expression!

For No. 2 I see a couple spots where I have trouble using the right hand fingering that I actually want to, which creates sticky spots. I think it's because I rest my thumb for a long time where I last muted something, and then it actually needs to play on another string a few beats later. I believe the cure is to slow it down to a PAINFULLY slow tempo and play with a metronome until what I'm aiming for becomes natural.

Number 10: I am intentionally playing the arpeggios a bit campanella rather than stopping the notes on their values, I think in this context it's appropriate to let things ring until the chord changes to a new one in the next measure or something.
Overall, though, I have some smoothness issues in a few spots, and I started to rush a little. Will have to work on that and try it again later!
EDIT: OK, after listening to it again, I also want to hear some big exaggeration in dynamics. In the beginning of the second section, the A and D bass notes, those should be really strong, and then maybe back off a lot when the sequence of 10ths starts in the measure following the D minor.
And I need to work on smoothness specifically in the D7 to G chord transition following the 10ths. A breath mark or pause before moving on to the low F seems appropriate too.

Open to any other thoughts you guys have as well!

Here I'm going to keep a playlist... what makes it on here is not necessarily what I think of as "perfect" but rather "almost good enough" so I can listen to myself and see what I think it would take to fill in the gap to "perfect." Should be a good exercise!

Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=P ... Lb8ZhSTBor

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Re: Let’s learn Sor’s Opus 60 together, shall we?

Post by powderedtoastman » Sun Jul 09, 2017 7:26 pm

OK... one last little thing for today coming from me.
Why stick to just what's written on the page? I think Sor would have wanted his students to start with this wonderful little gift he gave us, and build upon it.
And in fact I think you will find that this is quite consistent with that nice little tutorial on harmony that Rob MacKillop gave us on the first page of this thread.

I present to you, my first variation on Sor Op. 60 No. 1:

Youtube


Edit, alright, I couldn't resist, got one more:
Not too hard to take no. 1 and make a cute little waltz out of it!

Youtube

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Re: Let’s learn Sor’s Opus 60 together, shall we?

Post by Jorge Oliveira » Mon Jul 10, 2017 12:27 pm

powderedtoastman wrote:
Sun Jul 09, 2017 5:41 pm
I'm late to the party but I might as well try to cover all the ground, since I am invested in this opus as well!

Here's my contribution for #1:
...

#2:
...

And #10!
...

No. 1 I am fairly happy with how it's come out but there's always room for more dynamics and expression!

For No. 2 I see a couple spots where I have trouble using the right hand fingering that I actually want to, which creates sticky spots. I think it's because I rest my thumb for a long time where I last muted something, and then it actually needs to play on another string a few beats later. I believe the cure is to slow it down to a PAINFULLY slow tempo and play with a metronome until what I'm aiming for becomes natural.

Number 10: I am intentionally playing the arpeggios a bit campanella rather than stopping the notes on their values, I think in this context it's appropriate to let things ring until the chord changes to a new one in the next measure or something.
Overall, though, I have some smoothness issues in a few spots, and I started to rush a little. Will have to work on that and try it again later!
EDIT: OK, after listening to it again, I also want to hear some big exaggeration in dynamics. In the beginning of the second section, the A and D bass notes, those should be really strong, and then maybe back off a lot when the sequence of 10ths starts in the measure following the D minor.
And I need to work on smoothness specifically in the D7 to G chord transition following the 10ths. A breath mark or pause before moving on to the low F seems appropriate too.

Open to any other thoughts you guys have as well!

Here I'm going to keep a playlist... what makes it on here is not necessarily what I think of as "perfect" but rather "almost good enough" so I can listen to myself and see what I think it would take to fill in the gap to "perfect." Should be a good exercise!

Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=P ... Lb8ZhSTBor
Well, Steve (saw your name on your You Tube play list :)), despite, as you say, being late to the party, your contribution is enormous - four new video records in a single day! It's quite something :shock:.

I've listened to your renditions above, and I have only a few comments:
  • #1:
    Nicely played, good tempo. By the end of the second section, however, I was expecting a more steady rhythm. I'm sure you did in purpose, it is your interpretation, but, may be, the slowing down would be more appropriate at the end of the repeat, just before the end of the piece. Once again, I'm amazed with the way you automatically damp notes that may be ringing beyond their value :o. I wish I could do the same. In may case I have to know in advance, consciously, that a particular note has to be damped and train for it :(-
  • #2:
    Very well played, a fast tempo, nothing to say. Just one curiosity. In the video one cannot see well enough your RH. Are you playing using free strokes or apoyado? In my case I'm using free strokes but I wonder how the piece would sound if played in apoyado mode. Also, because I do not use the nail on my thumb, only the fleshy tip of it, which produces a velvety tone, rather different from the one produced by the other three fingers, I've abandoned the right hand fingering indications of the Chanterelle editor and, in this composition, I only use the thumb for the notes in the bass strings (4-6th), all the other notes being played with the i, m and a fingers. In the record I posted on 27-Dec-16, I still used the thumb for some notes on the third string, I may post soon a new record of this piece using the new RH fingering.
  • #10:
    Nothing to say, very well played, it's a joy to listen. And I agree that in this particular piece the notes may be left ringing beyond their value.
And this is all. Keep on posting your records :D.

The following table of posted records includes now your new records.
Sor's Opus 60 recorded pieces as of 09Jul17.png
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Aria A558, 655 mm, Cedar, 1987, Nagoya, Japan
Hermanos Camps Master, 650 mm, Cedar, 2014 (Nº 3), Spain

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Jorge Oliveira
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Re: Let’s learn Sor’s Opus 60 together, shall we?

Post by Jorge Oliveira » Mon Jul 10, 2017 12:39 pm

powderedtoastman wrote:
Sun Jul 09, 2017 7:26 pm
OK... one last little thing for today coming from me.
Why stick to just what's written on the page? I think Sor would have wanted his students to start with this wonderful little gift he gave us, and build upon it.
And in fact I think you will find that this is quite consistent with that nice little tutorial on harmony that Rob MacKillop gave us on the first page of this thread.

I present to you, my first variation on Sor Op. 60 No. 1:

Youtube


Edit, alright, I couldn't resist, got one more:
Not too hard to take no. 1 and make a cute little waltz out of it!

Youtube
Getting some fun, uh? I enjoyed listening :D.
Aria A558, 655 mm, Cedar, 1987, Nagoya, Japan
Hermanos Camps Master, 650 mm, Cedar, 2014 (Nº 3), Spain

powderedtoastman
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Re: Let’s learn Sor’s Opus 60 together, shall we?

Post by powderedtoastman » Mon Jul 10, 2017 4:02 pm

Thanks for the great comments, Jorge! This thread is really nice because each of us has a different calculated approach, and there are a lot of different options that come out of each one.

Yes I did slow down both times on #1. Maybe not so much a conscious decision as a force of habit, so that's a good point.

I think I would say that my muting of notes comes from the right hand technique approach I've been taught in the last year and a half. It's all about preparedness, getting into the habit of planting the fingers on the string of the next note before playing. There are two parts to this, one is the scales/chromatic exercises where we do a little "walking" action with the fingers and play as staccato as possible to get the feel for it. The other is arpeggios where we practice "full plant" for ascending arpeggios, and "sequential plant" for descending. It's in Scott Tennant's Pumping Nylon but he got it from the Romeros and they may have propagated it from somewhere before that. At any rate if you google those two terms you might find something good!
For me this approach has really had a lot of benefits, and once I had practiced it enough consciously it started to become a little more natural to do without thinking too much about it.
One drawback on the surface is that it can sometimes cause us to mute a note too early when we get a little excited and jump the gun on a planting action. But the nice thing is that practicing the preparedness approach usually gives us good control over what we're doing, and at that point it usually just takes a conscious decision and a little bit of pointed practice to prevent the plant in the context in question.
Sometimes there are also still open strings that get left ringing, and it may end up working out to use the left hand to stop them, but I still certainly find a lot of places where I have to come up with and practice some sort of solution! I read somewhere that Sor advocated using the left hand to mute but I'm not 100% sure.

I think I mostly use free strokes on number two, but it won't be a bad idea to go in there and see where some rest strokes might make sense.

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Re: Let’s learn Sor’s Opus 60 together, shall we?

Post by Jorge Oliveira » Mon Jul 10, 2017 6:10 pm

powderedtoastman wrote:
Mon Jul 10, 2017 4:02 pm
Thanks for the great comments, Jorge! This thread is really nice because each of us has a different calculated approach, and there are a lot of different options that come out of each one.

Yes I did slow down both times on #1. Maybe not so much a conscious decision as a force of habit, so that's a good point.

I think I would say that my muting of notes comes from the right hand technique approach I've been taught in the last year and a half. It's all about preparedness, getting into the habit of planting the fingers on the string of the next note before playing. There are two parts to this, one is the scales/chromatic exercises where we do a little "walking" action with the fingers and play as staccato as possible to get the feel for it. The other is arpeggios where we practice "full plant" for ascending arpeggios, and "sequential plant" for descending. It's in Scott Tennant's Pumping Nylon but he got it from the Romeros and they may have propagated it from somewhere before that. At any rate if you google those two terms you might find something good!
For me this approach has really had a lot of benefits, and once I had practiced it enough consciously it started to become a little more natural to do without thinking too much about it.
One drawback on the surface is that it can sometimes cause us to mute a note too early when we get a little excited and jump the gun on a planting action. But the nice thing is that practicing the preparedness approach usually gives us good control over what we're doing, and at that point it usually just takes a conscious decision and a little bit of pointed practice to prevent the plant in the context in question.
Sometimes there are also still open strings that get left ringing, and it may end up working out to use the left hand to stop them, but I still certainly find a lot of places where I have to come up with and practice some sort of solution! I read somewhere that Sor advocated using the left hand to mute but I'm not 100% sure.

I think I mostly use free strokes on number two, but it won't be a bad idea to go in there and see where some rest strokes might make sense.
Yes, many different opinions in this thread... :) but I'm learning a lot.

Concerning the muting of notes, I don't have Scott Tennant's Pumping Nylon, I acquired Hubert Kappel's The Bible of Classical Guitar Technique instead, so I'll google the expressions you indicated above. As for Kappel's Bible, it is a massive 250 pages book with all sort of subjects and exercises. I looked quickly and could not find any reference to muting notes with the left hand, only a section called "Simultaneous Attacking and Muting with the Thumb" but it is not related to what we are talking about. Nevertheless, I'm sure Kappel talks about muting notes with the left hand somewhere. As for Sor, a Dutch good friend of mine, Monique, sent me the a link with Sor's Method for the Spanish Guitar and in it, in the last paragraph of page 17, he writes about "Buffed sounds" (the correct word should be "muffled", I think) but, again, it is not the same as muting and already ringing note, instead, it is how to produce a muffled sound by not pressing entirely the string against the fret, but not producing and harmonic either.

Finally, the rest stroke... I don't know if you play already the #4. I started it with free strokes, but when I moved to rest strokes, uau!, I got a markedly improved tone. You should try it :). Back now to the #14...
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Re: Let’s learn Sor’s Opus 60 together, shall we?

Post by Jorge Oliveira » Tue Jul 11, 2017 10:05 pm

I'm now posting Sor's Opus 60 #14 for you all to listen to and comment. As usual, the record was produced with the Zoom Handy Recorder app on my iPhone, the sound capture being made by an iRig microphone that connects directly to the iPhone. The guitar used was my Hermanos Camps Master with Konobloch Actives Carbon CX, High Tension strings (5 months and 27 days old already, but still producing a good sound). The resulting .wav file was then processed with the Audacity audio editor on Windows 10 to produce the .wma file below. My impressions of this piece are, as usual, in green:

Sor’s Opus 60, Nº 14 (V1). Learning period: 21Jun17 - 11Jul17. Comment: This is my first attempt of Sor's Opus 60 #14. I cannot say I'm happy with it, nevertheless, I would appreciate your comments before posting a second version.
Fernando Sor - Opus 60 #14 (V1).wma

So, now, the table of posted studies is the following:
Sor's Opus 60 recorded pieces as of 11Jul17.png

My next self-assignment is to post a sound file of the #15 study.
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Aria A558, 655 mm, Cedar, 1987, Nagoya, Japan
Hermanos Camps Master, 650 mm, Cedar, 2014 (Nº 3), Spain

Peskyendeavour
Posts: 104
Joined: Wed May 17, 2017 11:15 pm

Re: Let’s learn Sor’s Opus 60 together, shall we?

Post by Peskyendeavour » Mon Jul 24, 2017 10:13 pm

I ran through Op 60 sight reading while drunk the other night because I read this thread earlier in the day and it felt like I should do it. I had so much fun... I have decided to do it seriously now sober. ;-)

So I practiced #1&2 which are lovely, Sor is such a great composer... There is always something new I discover every practice session I go back to it.

#3 - feels like it's an all thumbs piece (- I tried to look up earlier posts here to see how you interpreted and played it, but I can't find it and the site/ browser keep crashing when I look through the pages of post... Give up... I'm no techy.) Advice? On #3 interpretation and RH fingering - not on the web.

These are beautiful melodies I'm totally hooked, though I must say before this I was already hooked on Sor and was working on Op 31 before jumping to this. In some ways most of these single line melody pieces are more beautiful and complex, and even harder to play well. The production of each note or its stopping or not is even more exposed and critical.

Do you find that too?

I realised I'm joining the "party" late, since this thread started before I joined the forum.... and I don't have any recording equipment either, hope you won't throw me out because of that... I can only be a silent player...

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