Flamenco Melody

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Flamenco Melody

Postby Zajn » Sat Jun 23, 2007 6:33 pm

I purchased a DVD on flamenco music a while back by Aaron Gilmartin. I'm still trying to learn some of the material, but it's very difficult and I've kinda set it aside since. One thing I found interesting about it was he says that most flamenco melodies are played with rest strokes. I watched the performance of some of the pieces of the DVD, and he uses rest strokes to play all of the melodies... which are very fast. I find the task of playing multiple rest strokes (i.e. P and I or P and M both using rest strokes) to be very daunting. Any input on how I could improve this technique would be greatly appreciated.
Zajn
 

Postby Stephany » Sat Jun 23, 2007 8:11 pm

Hey man.
It's called picado, plus some runs are made with alternating am fingers which is much harder than im. The best way to practice these are actually from those boring scales exercises found in textbooks played all over fretboard.
You have to consider however, that you can't just sit nd play flamenco material on a regular classical instrument. Flamenco guitars have lower actions, which makes it easier to play over the fretboard, they are smaller at times and the position is different.
If you're board of scales you can actually take picado parts of flamenco pieces and practice those slowly with a metronome while gradualy increasing the tempo. Mamke sure when you switch from string to string you do not use the same finger (that is you absolutely have to alternate i and m finger for each consequitive note). Some guitarist said that playing two notes with the same finger is like making to steps with one foot.
(this is actually one of the difficulties I have to work out, I have a tendency to just let the finger roll from the higher to the lower string).
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Postby Zajn » Tue Jun 26, 2007 3:33 am

Okay, thanks for your suggestions. I remember that term picado now, haha. How much different are the two types of guitars? I know that flamenco guitars have a lower action like you said, but are there any other differences such as different woods, neck width etc?

I guess I'll get back to practicing those ever-exciting scales, hahaha. Thanks again!
Zajn
 

Postby mark96 » Tue Jun 26, 2007 10:38 am

Zajn wrote:Okay, thanks for your suggestions. I remember that term picado now, haha. How much different are the two types of guitars? I know that flamenco guitars have a lower action like you said, but are there any other differences such as different woods, neck width etc?

I guess I'll get back to practicing those ever-exciting scales, hahaha. Thanks again!


the flamenco guitar's body is not as deep, and it typically has a spruce top, and commonly cypress back and sides. It also has a golpeador to protect it from the golpe action.

Mark
The guitar is a small orchestra. It is polyphonic. Every string is a different color, a different voice.
Andre Segovia :guitare:
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