Important repertoire (studies and musical pieces)

Discussions relating to the classical guitar which don't fit elsewhere.
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Philcan
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Important repertoire (studies and musical pieces)

Postby Philcan » Wed Feb 06, 2008 3:50 pm

Hello,

I would like you to complete the list of important repertoire, which every professional classical guitarist should be able to play, or everyone who wants to be a professional should learn.

STUDIES
for the technique

Matteo Carcassi – 25 Studies (Op. 60)
Luigi Legnani – 36 Capricci (Op. 20)
Heitor Villa-Lobos – 12 Studies
Fernando Sor – 20 Studies (revised by Andrés Segovia)

------------------------------------------------

MUSICAL PIECES
for their musicality

Isaac Albeniz
Suite Espanola - Asturias (Leyenda)

Johann Sebastian Bach
Lute Suite no. 1 - Prelude and Presto, Sarabande
Lute Suite no. 2 - Prelude, Gigue
Lute Suite no. 3 - Gavotte I - II
Lute Suite no. 4 - Prelude, Gavotte en Rondeau
Prelude, Fugue and Allegro for Lute BWV 998
Prelude for Lute in D minor

Augustin Barrios Mangore
Valse no. 3
Valse no. 4
La Cathedral
Dinora
Una limosna por el amor de Dios (El ultimo tremolo)

Luis Bonfa
Manha de Carnaval

John Dowland
Frog Galliard
Lacrimae Pavan

Mauro Giuliani
Concerto for Guitar and Orchestra in A

Paco de Lucia
Rio Ancho

Johann Kaspar Mertz
Fantasie Hongroise
Nocturno No. 2 (Op. 4)

Stanley Myers
Cavatina

Niccolo Paganini
Grand Sonata A dur
Capriccio no. 24

Joaquin Rodrigo
Concierto de Aranjuez

Fernando Sor
Variation on the Mozart's Theme

Francisco Tarrega
Recuerdos de la Alhambra
Capricho Arabe

Antonio Vivaldi
Concerto for Lute (Guitar) and Orchestra in D

----------------------------------------------------------

Rio Ancho and Manha de Carnaval aren't classical pieces but I think, it's good to know them. They are popular and very nice.

Do you know anything else suitable for this list?
Philip Nyorde Artesson - The Jorvik Viking

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Vesuvio
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Re: Important repertoire (studies and musical pieces)

Postby Vesuvio » Wed Feb 06, 2008 4:56 pm

Hello Philcan,

Philcan wrote:...I would like you to complete the list of important repertoire, which every professional classical guitarist should be able to play, or everyone who wants to be a professional should learn...


Do we want all professional classical guitarists to have conformed to the study of a set list of works? Do we want them all to have the same repertoire?

Have I misunderstood? I'm not sure where you are going with this list,

Best wishes, V
"There are only two things worth aiming for, good music and a clean conscience." Paul Hindemith

fink23

Re: Important repertoire (studies and musical pieces)

Postby fink23 » Wed Feb 06, 2008 5:23 pm

I was actually just looking for something like this, I don't think its meant as a "pieces everybody must play before being considered a classical guitarist" but more a list of what would be considered to be the standard repertoire or as my teacher puts it "The Hits"(Bach perlude, Asturias etc.)

Pragueguy
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Re: Important repertoire (studies and musical pieces)

Postby Pragueguy » Wed Feb 06, 2008 7:16 pm

I am interested in such a list, if it would end up really being fairly valid, of studies that really build capability. I am not aware of such a list.

Jeremiah Lawson
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Re: Important repertoire (studies and musical pieces)

Postby Jeremiah Lawson » Wed Feb 06, 2008 9:17 pm

Echoing what Vesuvio wrote, I might AVOID repertoire if I knew all the other guitarists on earth knew it and played it. :) I mean, I'd STUDY it but that doesn't mean I'd try to gig with it if I were a professional guitarist.

TheField

Re: Important repertoire (studies and musical pieces)

Postby TheField » Thu Feb 07, 2008 2:18 am

Maybe the 20 etudes by Leo Brouwer?

Some people love them, some hate them... I love them personally, even though I only play the first 10.

Matthew

RainyDayMan
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Re: Important repertoire (studies and musical pieces)

Postby RainyDayMan » Thu Feb 07, 2008 2:51 am

Philcan wrote:Hello,

I would like you to complete the list of important repertoire, which every professional classical guitarist should be able to play, or everyone who wants to be a professional should learn.


I think every serious guitarist professional or otherwise should have a similar list. Every consevatory trained player should have come across many of those pieces in his studies. Professional guitarists need to differentiate themselves and they also need to play things which agree with their personalities. However every guitarist should be aspire to play certain things like Recuerdos, Leyenda and Villa-Lobos as these are central to the guitar. I am sure pretty much every classical pianist can dash off the Moonlight sonata. However, these should be personal goals. If you play for people, it is good to have a selection of stuff which they will enjoy. The great thing about the guitar is that even relatively simple pieces can sound really wonderful when imaginatively played.
Last edited by RainyDayMan on Thu Feb 07, 2008 10:15 am, edited 1 time in total.

mpearo

Re: Important repertoire (studies and musical pieces)

Postby mpearo » Fri Feb 08, 2008 7:36 pm

I think you can imagine this list to be, certainly a partial listing of standards for the CG player, not unlike the jazz concept of the "Standard". Old stand-bys that every player should know.

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GEO
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Re: Important repertoire (studies and musical pieces)

Postby GEO » Sat Feb 09, 2008 11:27 am

Hmm...your list is a bit thin on Renaissance. I'd add: Milan's Pavans, Narváez Cancion del Emperador, Guardame las vacas.

Baroque: Sanz Canarios, de Viseé Suite in D.

It's going to be a L O N G list. :chaud:

geo
(US) (GER) The greatest good you can do for another is not just share your riches, but to reveal to him his own - Disraeli

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Philcan
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Re: Important repertoire (studies and musical pieces)

Postby Philcan » Sun Feb 10, 2008 2:41 pm

Yes I agree, every artist should be at least a little bit different than the others. I don't want to say you should play and record pieces of this list. For example, I would like to play and record my own compositions, but firstly it's good to learn everything important. So I try to create bases on the road to the professional level.

In previous post I forgot an important Bach's Bourree and Lobos' Five Preludes. De Visee Suite in D minor is also quite popular, I like Bourree and Sarabande from it. I also have played an easy but very nice small piece of J. K. Mertz called Adagio. I think it's very thankful to play it at concert. And of course, very easy and popular is also Spanish Romance. I also agree with Brouwer Studies.

Geo, I apologize that my list is thin on Renaissance. I like this period, but I'm not sure about the pieces, so I like you've recommended me something.

To know important pieces is also needed to be a good guitar tutor. It's necessary to know music which you are teaching.
Philip Nyorde Artesson - The Jorvik Viking

Gruupi
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Re: Important repertoire (studies and musical pieces)

Postby Gruupi » Sun Feb 10, 2008 5:11 pm

Even though the same pieces come up again and again, there is a considerable backlash against just such a concept. I am of the camp that a concert performer should know enough of the standards to satisfy a general audience. The people that may attend a concert one a year or less are better served by hearing the songs that help make the guitar popular in the first place. But the ultimate choice should be what the artist can play passionately, if a piece is stale to the performer then he shouldn't feel obliged to play it.

I think it has become acceptable to mix it up some. Have a repetoire that includes the major styles, eras and composers with a few hits mixed in and the concert should be fine. I personally have a hard time listening to a whole concert if there isn't at least one or two familiar pieces to really just enjoy.

That being said there ARE some songs that are just so central to what people think of when they think classical guitar that its ok to list them :) I think these are songs that the general public would love to hear played. These aren't my personal favorites, just the generally accepted standards.

Leyenda- Asturius, is there any difference between these two, I never knew?
Recuerdos de Alhambra
Concierto de Aranjuez
Several works by Bach or Villa Lobos could be added to the list, its hard to choose one but hard to leave any out either.
Cavatina
Romance


Variations on a theme by Mozart



I don't know if the guitarist/ composers like Guiliani, Carcassi, Paganini or modern people like Brouwer make the list. Do any non-guitarists like or respect this music? Barrios is really popular right now but is that just amongst guitarists as well. Sor except for the Mozart variations is not really that popular either.

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Philcan
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Re: Important repertoire (studies and musical pieces)

Postby Philcan » Mon Feb 11, 2008 11:38 am

Fatal error, I forgot Bach's Chaconne. Excuse me, Mr. Bach :roll: !!!
Philip Nyorde Artesson - The Jorvik Viking

Sean

Re: Important repertoire (studies and musical pieces)

Postby Sean » Mon Feb 11, 2008 12:26 pm

Those Mozart variations sure have a way of "popping up" on an awful lot of recitals for a piece that isn't that popular.

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Philcan
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Re: Important repertoire (studies and musical pieces)

Postby Philcan » Wed Feb 13, 2008 7:22 pm

When you mentioned Giuliani, Carcassi, Paganini... Giuliani and Carcassi didn't have so much to play. They had to compose, if they wanted to play it. But Paganini as violin master was drilling Tartini, Vivaldi and other Italian violin virtuosos. I think, it's quite suitable to know what was created before myself.


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