Christopher Parkening's guitar(s)?

Discussions relating to the classical guitar which don't fit elsewhere.
gansz
Posts: 225
Joined: Thu Feb 18, 2010 6:36 pm

Christopher Parkening's guitar(s)?

Postby gansz » Fri Nov 05, 2010 5:08 pm

Greetings, all--

Has Parkening always been strictly a Jose Ramirez III player?

I'm wondering what guitar he plays on his recording of Emler Bernstein's Concerto for Guitar

(http://www.parkening.com/zbernst.html). The liner notes say nothing. Argh!

Many thanks in advance.

Cheers,

David
1863 James Ashborn, Spruce/Maple
1990 Jose Marin Plazuelo, Spruce/Indian Rosewood
2010 David LaPlante, Spruce/Maple

edwardsguitar

Re: Christopher Parkening's guitar(s)?

Postby edwardsguitar » Fri Nov 05, 2010 7:43 pm

I do remember liner notes on an early album of his giving credit to another luthier, but I can't recall the name.

Rick-in-Annapolis
Posts: 482
Joined: Fri Apr 20, 2007 10:22 am
Location: Annapolis, MD (USA)

Re: Christopher Parkening's guitar(s)?

Postby Rick-in-Annapolis » Fri Nov 05, 2010 8:19 pm

edwardsguitar wrote:I do remember liner notes on an early album of his giving credit to another luthier, but I can't recall the name.


Accoring to our own (Delcamp) website...

Christopher Parkening, USA -
Jose Ramirez III, Spain, 1966, 1967 MT, cedar 1962, 1964, spruce 1973, cedar
Thomas Malapanis, USA

gansz
Posts: 225
Joined: Thu Feb 18, 2010 6:36 pm

Re: Christopher Parkening's guitar(s)?

Postby gansz » Sat Nov 06, 2010 10:33 pm

Thanks, Rick. Yup, that confirms all I've ever read to date.

The guitar in the recording, however, does not sound like a typical (as if there were such a thing!!!) Ramirez III to my ears, so I thought it might be some other luthier.

Any idea which Ramirez he would have been playing at the time the recording was made?

Cheers,

David
1863 James Ashborn, Spruce/Maple
1990 Jose Marin Plazuelo, Spruce/Indian Rosewood
2010 David LaPlante, Spruce/Maple

Jeremy Hickerson
Amateur luthier
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Joined: Tue Feb 03, 2009 5:20 am
Location: Salem, Oregon

Re: Christopher Parkening's guitar(s)?

Postby Jeremy Hickerson » Wed Dec 12, 2012 1:03 am

There was a time when he was touring playing Segovia's Ramirez - he recorded an album on it too, if I remember right. I think this was near the time of the Bernstein recording.
Jeremy

Guitarras: 1973 Manouk Papazian (Spruce/Morado), two I have built, and an old Telesforo Julve parlor size

Intune
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Joined: Wed Feb 14, 2007 1:20 pm
Location: Connecticut, USA

Re: Christopher Parkening's guitar(s)?

Postby Intune » Wed Dec 12, 2012 11:01 am

I've heard, but cannot confirm, that he likes his guitars set up with a very high action. Can anyone comment on this?
Intune
2010 Andres Marvi (cedar/Madagascar rosewood)

"...beware of all enterprises that require new clothes..." -- H.D. Thoreau

gitgeezer
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Location: Southeastern U.S.

Re: Christopher Parkening's guitar(s)?

Postby gitgeezer » Wed Dec 12, 2012 2:32 pm

The insert in The Artistry of Christopher Parkening states that he plays Ramirez guitars supplied by Sherry-Brenner. The notes mention that:

“Parkening’s critically acclaimed A Tribute to Segovia (CDC-494040) was dedicated to the great Spanish guitarist and was recorded on one of the Maestro’s own concert guitars.”

fereng02

Re: Christopher Parkening's guitar(s)?

Postby fereng02 » Wed Dec 12, 2012 2:47 pm

Hi All,

I read an article sometime ago via the internet. Yes he plays with a very high action what exactly it is the article didn't say. He also plays with 2 or 3 strings that are from I think Argentina. They are not easy to get so he bought a few years worth. As far as the action goes he was saying if he needs power it is there, that's why he prefers the action high.

George

Gil_Wade
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Location: Benbrook (Fort Worth), Texas

Re: Christopher Parkening's guitar(s)?

Postby Gil_Wade » Mon Dec 17, 2012 2:12 am

He is a believer in high action 664 Ramirez's. The long scale gives power. The higher action adds to the power but also increases the tonal textures available. Higher action also allows for a complete phrase from soft to loud in the same tambre.
Gil ( o )===:::

Gilbert Wade, Certified Music Practitioner

"Use the talents you possess, for the woods would be silent if no bird sang except the best." Anonymous

"I get a lot of requests...but I play anyway." from a cartoon

Intune
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Joined: Wed Feb 14, 2007 1:20 pm
Location: Connecticut, USA

Re: Christopher Parkening's guitar(s)?

Postby Intune » Mon Dec 17, 2012 12:13 pm

Gil Wade wrote:
"He is a believer in high action 664 Ramirez's. The long scale gives power. The higher action adds to the power but also increases the tonal textures available. Higher action also allows for a complete phrase from soft to loud in the same tambre."


Parkening must have large and quite strong hands. I'd probably get tendonitis from playing his guitars for more than half an hour. For his part -- and to illustrate how opinions might differ -- David Russell prefers a soft, low action on his (650 mm) Dammann and would gladly trade a little power for easy playability, or so he said following a master class. This would seem an easier choice to make with a Dammann doubletop, which is relatively loud to begin with, than with a traditional Ramirez, which might be more dependent on long string length, high string tension, and a high action setup to maximize volume and tone. For what it's worth, I've heard that Manuel Barrueco, like Parkening, also plays long-scale guitars, but I don't know about his action setups. I do know that Israeli virtuoso Yuri Liberzon, a student of Barrueco's at Peabody who'd purchased one of the maestro's long-scale Rucks, had to trade it in after developing hand problems. What's my point? Each to his own, I suppose....
Intune
2010 Andres Marvi (cedar/Madagascar rosewood)

"...beware of all enterprises that require new clothes..." -- H.D. Thoreau

Gil_Wade
Posts: 401
Joined: Tue Oct 02, 2007 9:42 pm
Location: Benbrook (Fort Worth), Texas

Re: Christopher Parkening's guitar(s)?

Postby Gil_Wade » Wed Dec 26, 2012 4:00 am

In essence, unless you are planning on being an professional performer, what you choose in make, model, scale length, setup on matters as long as it makes you happy. Do as you please...follow who you want. Classical guitar is a very complex technique that takes a lot of time and effort and probably is never fully achieved. So you choose what works for you.

Intune wrote:Parkening must have large and quite strong hands. I'd probably get tendonitis from playing his guitars for more than half an hour. For his part -- and to illustrate how opinions might differ -- David Russell prefers a soft, low action on his (650 mm) Dammann and would gladly trade a little power for easy playability, or so he said following a master class. This would seem an easier choice to make with a Dammann doubletop, which is relatively loud to begin with, than with a traditional Ramirez, which might be more dependent on long string length, high string tension, and a high action setup to maximize volume and tone. For what it's worth, I've heard that Manuel Barrueco, like Parkening, also plays long-scale guitars, but I don't know about his action setups. I do know that Israeli virtuoso Yuri Liberzon, a student of Barrueco's at Peabody who'd purchased one of the maestro's long-scale Rucks, had to trade it in after developing hand problems. What's my point? Each to his own, I suppose....


Any guitar will hurt your hands/arms/whatever if you don't use correct technique. Also I expect someone to be adult enough to react to the beginning of pain and not push it to the point of hurting oneself. Anyone going from lower action to higher action should expect a (little0 time to get use to the new tension. Evidently many don't. For those who use and believe there is a positive side that most don't seem to know. I'm just trying to tell that side. If it doesn't fit you and your style, ignore it.

What's the point? I play a 1991 Ramirez 664 de Camara. I've had it for about 7 or 8 years. My bass side is 6mm and treble is 5 mm throughout that whole time. I have not hurt my hands. I started in my 50's and am now 61. What can I do with it that David Russell can't do with his Dammann? I play in a guitar orchestra. One of our pieces is a three-movement Sonate en Sol Mineur by Vivaldi. The middle movement, Larghetto, ranges in volume from P to MP to MF to F to FF. The other two movements are fast...this movement is slow and mellow. Loudnesss is determined by the amptitude that the strings vibrate. The mellowlest of tones come when the string vibrates at a 90 degree angle to the fretboard/top. To go from the softest my Ramirez can play to the loudest I'm pushing from 1 mm (P) up to 6 mm (FF) and my strings are still vibrating on the optimum 90 degree plane. Think of two identical cars: car 1 has a gas peddle that only moves 2 inches and car 2 gas peedle moves 4 inches. Car 2 will be easier to drive in town where speed zones change by 5 or 10 mph at any one time. Car 1 might work well on the highway (wide open) but will be harder to find the inteval for the slower speeds. If DR's guitar is just as loud at it's loudest as my Ramirez then he has to work in fractions of a mm to achieve the same effect as I get. But probably his Dammann isn't as loud so to match my Ramirez he starts mellow until he runs out of action room and then has to start pulling the string at some angle more sideways (and much less pleasing in tone) to match what I do. It is one of many subtle lessons that Segovia, Bream, the Romeros, Parkening and others seem to have learned and many others, while good musicians, haven't.
Gil ( o )===:::

Gilbert Wade, Certified Music Practitioner

"Use the talents you possess, for the woods would be silent if no bird sang except the best." Anonymous

"I get a lot of requests...but I play anyway." from a cartoon


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