Andres Segovia Archive pieces becoming standards?

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Re: Andres Segovia Archive pieces becoming standards?

Postby David_Norton » Wed Jun 29, 2011 11:28 pm

A point of clarification, if I may?

By the phrase "Segovia Archives", we are referring specifically to the collection of some three- or four-dozen pieces recovered by Angelo Gilardino on May 7 2001 at Segovia's home in Spain, and subsequently published as "The Segovia Archive Series" by Edizione Musicale Bèrben. These pieces were never performed or even edited by Segovia, they were left in boxes in his study. A number of these pieces are quite exceptional, and some are .... Well, there's good reason he didn't bother with these last mentioned. A few, even Gilardino didn't bother with publishing! And, by agreement with Ricordi, new versions of Castelnuovo-Tedesco's Tarantella and Capricho Diabolico were published as well.

Quite a number of players have recorded many of these. The CD by Martha Masters contains several Archive works (by LaParra, Arregui, San Sebastian, and Pahissa). A CD by Luigi Attademo on the Sei Corde label has the works by Lennox Berkeley, Cyril Scott, Henri Collet, Henri Martelli, Fernande Peyrot, and the manuscript version of Mompou's famous Suite Compostelana. Detlev Bork and Delcamp member Gerard Cousins have each recorded Una Leyenda by Pedro SanJuan, which I feel is one of the best of the bunch. The Segovia Archive piece which has gained the most exposure is a wonderful -- and difficult! -- Fantasia-Sonata from around 1955 written by Federico Moreno-Torroba. It is instantly recognizable as Torroba, it has all of that Spanish zarzuela flavour to it, and more. It runs 17 minutes, and is a real knuckle-cruncher, but really worthwhile, and compositionally stands far above the usual 3-minute Spanish Postcard tunes we associate with him.

All the other works which we relate with Andres Segovia (Ponce, Torroba, Turina, Tansman, Duarte, etc) which he performed and recorded many times over are usually called the "Segovia Repertoire". This is a subtle (and perhaps nit-picky) differentiation from this well-established body of important literature known as the "Segovia Archive", and the newly-recovered works under discussion.

Hope this helps to clarify things a bit.
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Re: Andres Segovia Archive pieces becoming standards?

Postby John O » Wed Jun 29, 2011 11:37 pm

David_Norton wrote:A CD by Luigi Attademo on the Sei Corde label has the works by Lennox Berkeley, Cyril Scott, Henri Collet, Henri Martelli, Fernande Peyrot, and the manuscript version of Mompou's famous Suite Compostelana.

The only version of that CD that I find referenced on the net is on Sei Corde's site, an Italian language guitar magazine that offered it a few years ago as a bonus CD that came with that month's issue of the magazine. The offer does not appear valid anymore. If you can find it separately, please post the link!
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Re: Andres Segovia Archive pieces becoming standards?

Postby 19thcenturyguitarist » Wed Jun 29, 2011 11:37 pm

Ah Ha! Yes, thanks for that thourough explanation. Now i know the difference between, Segovia Archive and Segovia Repertoire!
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Re: Andres Segovia Archive pieces becoming standards?

Postby David_Norton » Thu Jun 30, 2011 12:02 am

John O wrote:The only version of that CD that I find referenced on the net is on Sei Corde's site, an Italian language guitar magazine that offered it a few years ago as a bonus CD that came with that month's issue of the magazine. The offer does not appear valid anymore. If you can find it separately, please post the link!


That's about when I bought it. Luigi has a website, you could write to him (his English is tolerable) and see about obtaining a copy.
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Re: Andres Segovia Archive pieces becoming standards?

Postby Sean » Thu Jun 30, 2011 1:59 am

John O wrote:
David_Norton wrote:A CD by Luigi Attademo on the Sei Corde label has the works by Lennox Berkeley, Cyril Scott, Henri Collet, Henri Martelli, Fernande Peyrot, and the manuscript version of Mompou's famous Suite Compostelana.

The only version of that CD that I find referenced on the net is on Sei Corde's site, an Italian language guitar magazine that offered it a few years ago as a bonus CD that came with that month's issue of the magazine. The offer does not appear valid anymore. If you can find it separately, please post the link!


Pickles. I always miss out on the good stuff.
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Re: Andres Segovia Archive pieces becoming standards?

Postby John O » Thu Jun 30, 2011 2:41 am

I emailed him--I'll report back with his response if I get one.
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Re: Andres Segovia Archive pieces becoming standards?

Postby Sean » Thu Jun 30, 2011 12:19 pm

Thanks! I'm not sure anyone else has played the Collet.
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Re: Andres Segovia Archive pieces becoming standards?

Postby JohnML » Thu Jun 30, 2011 5:46 pm

David_Norton wrote:A point of clarification, if I may?

By the phrase "Segovia Archives", we are referring specifically to the collection of some three- or four-dozen pieces recovered by Angelo Gilardino on May 7 2001 at Segovia's home in Spain, and subsequently published as "The Segovia Archive Series" by Edizione Musicale Bèrben. These pieces were never performed or even edited by Segovia, they were left in boxes in his study. A number of these pieces are quite exceptional, and some are .... Well, there's good reason he didn't bother with these last mentioned. A few, even Gilardino didn't bother with publishing! And, by agreement with Ricordi, new versions of Castelnuovo-Tedesco's Tarantella and Capricho Diabolico were published as well.

...

All the other works which we relate with Andres Segovia (Ponce, Torroba, Turina, Tansman, Duarte, etc) which he performed and recorded many times over are usually called the "Segovia Repertoire". This is a subtle (and perhaps nit-picky) differentiation from this well-established body of important literature known as the "Segovia Archive", and the newly-recovered works under discussion.

Hope this helps to clarify things a bit.


Thanks, that explanation was vital.
I think it's misleading to talk of the "Segovia Archives" as a standard term, if it's just the term that publisher Bèrben made up for publishing works that were rejected by Segovia.
These might more descriptively and truthfully be called: "Archive of works rejected and never played by Segovia" :D
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Re: Andres Segovia Archive pieces becoming standards?

Postby Sean » Thu Jun 30, 2011 5:55 pm

JohnML, I respectfully disagree with you concerning the use of the term Segovia Archive. I'm not sure what else "Segovia Archive" would describe other than the body of literature rescued by Gilardino and others as David Norton described above. Your definition, "Arcive of works rejected and never played by Segovia", would include, among other works, the Quatre Pieces Breves by Frank Martin. This piece wasn't played by Segovia, but isn't a part of the Archive. Addtionally, we know that Segovia played some of the pieces in the Archive; this would include, among possibly others, a movement from the Arregui as well as the first movement of the Scott Sonatina.
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Re: Andres Segovia Archive pieces becoming standards?

Postby JohnML » Thu Jun 30, 2011 6:04 pm

Sean wrote:JohnML, I respectfully disagree with you concerning the use of the term Segovia Archive. I'm not sure what else "Segovia Archive" would describe other than the body of literature rescued by Gilardino and others as David Norton described above. Your definition, "Arcive of works rejected and never played by Segovia", would include, among other works, the Quatre Pieces Breves by Frank Martin. This piece wasn't played by Segovia, but isn't a part of the Archive. Addtionally, we know that Segovia played some of the pieces in the Archive; this would include, among possibly others, a movement from the Arregui as well as the first movement of the Scott Sonatina.


My main point is that I doubt that using a name given by a publisher to a group of works is a good way of describing them. Just because a work was dedicated to Segovia, does not necessarily mean that it's a good idea to associate it with him in closer terms.

I think if Segovia were alive, he would not like seeing his name associated with many of the works!! :shock:
Last edited by JohnML on Thu Jun 30, 2011 6:05 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Andres Segovia Archive pieces becoming standards?

Postby 19thcenturyguitarist » Thu Jun 30, 2011 6:05 pm

Sean, my sentiments...Exactly! Segovia was but one man and had hundreds of pieces being written for him and tossed his way. He could never have found the time to properly study them ALL to a concert worthy performance, let alone find time to record everything, plus work on old material like pieces from the renaissance, baroque, to the classics.
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Re: Andres Segovia Archive pieces becoming standards?

Postby Sean » Thu Jun 30, 2011 6:31 pm

JohnML wrote:My main point is that I doubt that using a name given by a publisher to a group of works is a good way of describing them. Just because a work was dedicated to Segovia, does not necessarily mean that it's a good idea to associate it with him in closer terms.

I think if Segovia were alive, he would not like seeing his name associated with many of the works!! :shock:


Interesting, considering it was Segovia who kept these works ("Who knows what is in that mine?"). Obviously the maestro had ample time to destroy works he didn't consider worthy, but that's neither here nor there.

I see absolutely nothing wrong with the term Segovia Archive, and I will continue to use it.
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Re: Andres Segovia Archive pieces becoming standards?

Postby 19thcenturyguitarist » Thu Jun 30, 2011 6:51 pm

Sean wrote:I see absolutely nothing wrong with the term Segovia Archive, and I will continue to use it.


:D right on man! :wink:
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Re: Andres Segovia Archive pieces becoming standards?

Postby John Ray » Fri Oct 19, 2012 1:55 pm

All that work that Gilardino did searching through Segovia's archives has given fruit of a different nature.

http://www.granadaexpert.com/johnray/ne ... gilardino/
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Re: Andres Segovia Archive pieces becoming standards?

Postby David_Norton » Fri Oct 19, 2012 6:42 pm

Thanks for that link, John. Perhaps someone will translate it to English in a few years, as Charles Postelwate did for the Escande book on Segovia's years in Montevideo.
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