Torres, 1863.

Construction and repair of Classical Guitar and related instruments
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Michael.N.
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Torres, 1863.

Postby Michael.N. » Wed Apr 03, 2013 2:08 pm

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RLpEHg1wShk

My 'copy' of this interesting, small Torres Guitar. It has a wonderful Plantilla. The lines and proportions of the bouts and waist are where Torres excelled. The only other Guitars that have such an agreeable plantilla are the very small Torres with scale lengths of around 60 cm's.
I didn't quite manage to make mine in a 'couple of days'. It took me 40 hours work including making a couple of templates and a quick Solera. Probably made in a similar manner i.e. not being overly fussy with technical perfection. In fact there were many times when I had to stop myself from trying to alter niggling errors. That's a lot more difficult than you might imagine. It's almost like fighting against your own instincts. OK so it's a bit freely made in a traditional craftsmen sort of way. Still plays and sounds pretty good to my ears. I'll guess that was the original Torres intent. I very much doubt that he could spend endless hours fussing over details. Food was pretty hard to come by in those days.
There's not a whole lot going on in the engine room:

Image

It also gave me the perfect excuse to try my 'Torres Green'.

Image

I used Cherry with a Walnut centre panel. The Cherry is a little too fancy for this type of instrument but it's what I had to hand. Thankfully it isn't bookmatched nor do the two sides match. The European Spruce soundboard has it's wide grain at the centre line, simply because the reflection was better. The neck was salvaged from one abandoned many years ago. The fretboard Oak, the Bridge Pear with laburnum wear strips. All very Torres in approach. Use what was available.

Image


Image

It was all varnished in the space of 24 hours, strings on. My kind of Guitar building. I'll leave you all fastened to electron microscopes peering at purfling mitres. Freedom feels good.
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Anthony Campanella
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Re: Torres, 1863.

Postby Anthony Campanella » Wed Apr 03, 2013 2:51 pm

Excellent! Is this before he used fan bracing?
I notice the low placement of the bridge, what's the scale?
Looks a little deep for the length.
What year would you put this at? oops I see it's 1863
Sustenance is still a challenge!

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senunkan
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Re: Torres, 1863.

Postby senunkan » Wed Apr 03, 2013 3:03 pm

:bravo: Very beautiful.
Is this the Torres which has no bracing as per the youtube video whereby the guitar was examined by R. E. Brune?
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Michael.N.
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Re: Torres, 1863.

Postby Michael.N. » Wed Apr 03, 2013 3:09 pm

It's the one in the video. There's also an article about the very same Guitar here:

http://www.vintageguitar.com/3434/anton ... rres-1863/
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David LaPlante
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Re: Torres, 1863.

Postby David LaPlante » Wed Apr 03, 2013 3:10 pm

Most appealing Michael!!
In my own efforts along these lines I've tried to work in a more organic and less "crafty" way in trying to capture some of the character of the originals. Too many of the copies that I've seen have the character of a modern guitar which I think misses the mark.
The neck and peghead of the original of this one are very similar to another early small Torres, the FE 07, which resides at Yale University here in the U.S. and which I had the opportunity to closely examine a number of years ago. Both of these pegheads seem to emulate that of Manuel Gutierrez with whom Torres was associated.
I'm also guessing that the plantilla and size (with the exception of the depth) are very similar to the SE 151A that I've documented.
Lovely work!

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James Lister
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Re: Torres, 1863.

Postby James Lister » Wed Apr 03, 2013 3:34 pm

Very nice Michael. I particularly like the rosette.
Did you take the ribs down to 0.8mm?

James
James Lister, luthier, Sheffield UK

Scot Tremblay
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Re: Torres, 1863.

Postby Scot Tremblay » Wed Apr 03, 2013 3:50 pm

Beautiful Michael!

I'll leave you all fastened to electron microscopes peering at purfling mitres.


Where's the mitres?? I don't see any mitres... :D
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"I'm not crazy about reality but it's still the best place to get a decent meal."
-Groucho Marx-

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Michael.N.
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Re: Torres, 1863.

Postby Michael.N. » Wed Apr 03, 2013 4:43 pm

James Lister wrote:Very nice Michael. I particularly like the rosette.
Did you take the ribs down to 0.8mm?

James


I went 0.1 mm better, down to 0.7 mm's. I just knew someone was going to ask that. Actually 1.5 mm's was as far as I dare go with it, especially considering the ribs are as deep as a full sized modern. Same with the Soundboard. 2 mm thickness without any strutting is pushing it. I went to 2.5 mm centre, thinning a little towards the edge.
There you go, built to last.
Historicalguitars.

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Doug Ingram
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Re: Torres, 1863.

Postby Doug Ingram » Wed Apr 03, 2013 5:36 pm

Awesome! Which 1863 are you referencing with this?
My living room is littered with a dozen Ingram guitars.

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Michael.N.
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Re: Torres, 1863.

Postby Michael.N. » Wed Apr 03, 2013 6:36 pm

The 1863 that was in the 19th century Doug. :? It's the one in the Youtube clip, the Torres that was restored by Richard Brune. It's not in the Romanillos book but it is in some ways similar to the one in the Yale collection that David referred to.
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Doug Ingram
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Re: Torres, 1863.

Postby Doug Ingram » Wed Apr 03, 2013 9:07 pm

Michael.N. wrote:The 1863 that was in the 19th century Doug. :?


Smartass.

I should have know better but wasn't thinking that way when I was writing! I'd have responded the same way.

I've seen the Brune clip before, I didn't follow your link so didn't realize that this was the guitar that you built.
My living room is littered with a dozen Ingram guitars.

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waitswatcher
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Re: Torres, 1863.

Postby waitswatcher » Thu Apr 04, 2013 7:36 am

gorgeous!

ChristianSchwengeler
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Re: Torres, 1863.

Postby ChristianSchwengeler » Thu Apr 04, 2013 8:57 am

Hi Michael,

I really like the spirit of your work. You even had the courage to glue in the label in a unorthodox way. I like this very simple finish also. As you say don’t worry be happy.

tom0311
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Re: Torres, 1863.

Postby tom0311 » Thu Apr 04, 2013 10:11 am

Fantastic work :) looks amazing.

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Michael.N.
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Re: Torres, 1863.

Postby Michael.N. » Tue Apr 23, 2013 1:54 pm

I sent the small Torres to Rob Mackillop to gather his thoughts on this somewhat unusual Guitar:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=pl ... hCi0XaQD0#!

Just remember: No saddle, Lute style bridge and no bracing.
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