D05 Classical guitar lesson 04

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Michele Franceschini
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Re: D05 Classical guitar lesson 04

Post by Michele Franceschini » Sun Dec 13, 2015 9:17 pm

John, I liked the rendition of both pieces (a lot). One suggestion that I have is regarding Brescianello's piece. There are repeated phrases, I remember from my days studying guitar many years ago that usually repeats are used as an occasion to bring out the tone flexibility of the guitar, in particular, making one of the repeats either metallic (playing close to the bridge) or volume contrast (pp vs f). That's my only suggestion, to bring out the various repeats by changing tone and or dynamics.

Cheers,

Michele

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John Montes
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Re: D05 Classical guitar lesson 04

Post by John Montes » Tue Dec 15, 2015 3:40 am

Thanks for listening, the kind words, feedback, and pointers Jean-Michel, Gieseppe, Marko, Erik, and Michelle, much appreciated.

I'll work to make the next set of recordings more polished and with...fewer external noise-makers :-)
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Re: D05 Classical guitar lesson 04

Post by John Montes » Wed Dec 16, 2015 4:41 am

Here's a recording of the supplemental Carcassi etude XVI
There's a little hesitant drag in tempo around 1:14 :-)
The tempo used currently is much slower, working to increase tempo and polish with more practice in future performances of the piece

Youtube
2001 Vicente Carrillo 1a Rio
1998 German Rubio Vazquez Estudio
2015 Cordoba Solista
2012 Cordoba C7
La Bella & D'Addario Strings

EricKatz
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Re: D05 Classical guitar lesson 04

Post by EricKatz » Thu Dec 17, 2015 1:47 pm

Here's some interesting background information about the five pieces of lesson 4, I would like to share with you.

Luys De Narvàez (ca. 1500-1555) Tres Diferencias por otra parte
These three pieces (Otras diferencias hechas por otra parte) from Book 6 (Libro sesto) follow right after the first four diferencias that we already know from lesson 2. Narvaez' vihuela books 1-6 were published in 1538 in Valladolid (Spain), where he lived under the patronage of the secretary of State. Later he was was employed as musician of the royal chapel. Together with other musicians, he accompanied king Philips II on his many journeys (e.g. during the winter of 1549 he visited the Netherlands).

Jean-Baptiste Besard (1567-1625) Ballet
In 1617 Jean-Baptiste Besard, who lived from 1610 on in Augsburg (Germany), published "Novus Partus, sive Concertationes Musicae", a collection of 61 lute pieces (solo and ensemble), many of which were by Besard himself.
Besard was not only a musician, composer and publisher, but also a scientist. He studied law and medicine and wrote treatises on medicine, physics and history.
Musical style: Renaissance and/or early Baroque.

Giuseppe Antonio Brescianello (1690-1757) - Allegro de la Partita VII
Brescianello was a talented violinist from Florence who moved at the age of 26 years to Stuttgart (Germany) to become musical director at the court of Württemberg. Fifteen years later he made a promotion to Oberkapellmeister. He wrote all kinds of concert works, cantates, opera's (so he's not a specific guitar or lute composer). Brescianello died in Stuttgart on Oct 4th 1758 (not 1757).
The 18 groups of pieces for gallichone, a kind of 6 course bass lute, are supposed to be written around 1740 when Brescianello was without a job. In 1737 he was fired due to the courts economic collapse, but he was reinstalled in 1744. It is his only known work for lute c.q. gallichone! The manuscript doesn't use terms like Partita, Sonata or Suite (Ruggero Chiesa made a transcription in 1981 and called them Partitas and for unknown reasons he also introduced the name "colascione" for the instrument. So I guess Mr. Delcamp used Chiesa's book). The famous luthist Terrel Stone, who recorded Sonata I-IX, prefers the term Sonata. Our piece is part of the Sonata No.7 in C Major: I.Allegro (2:22) - II.Andante (1:27)- III.Allegro (1:10). So the title in the lesson book is a bit confusing. In fact we play the second Allegro!
Musical style: "stile galant", the transition from the Baroque to the classical period.

Matteo Carcassi (1792-1853) Etude XVI opus 60
Just like Brescianello, Matteo Carcassi was born in Florence - only about hundred years later. And just like Besard and Brescianello he lived abroad for the most part of his life. Carcassi lived in Paris from 1820 on. He composed 77 works (op.1-77) and a lot of works without opus number. His "25 Etudes mélodiques" (Op.60) were published two years before he died.
Brian Jeffery made some very interesting remarks on this piece in his Op.60 Tecla-edition: "Andante at this period means “with movement”, so not too slow.
The top part is lyrical, sustained. Make it sing. The frequent “hairpins” (accent or decrescendo marks) are very deliberate and indicate how this line is intended to be played. The lower part is like a series of thuds because of the rests which are exactly notated and should be observed. In nearly all places this is best done by using the m finger for all the top line and p i for the chords, placing p i back on the strings to dampen them. Perhaps Carcassi composed this piece as a study in étouffé."

João Guimarães (1883-1947) Sons de carillhões
João Teixeira Guimarães (known as João Pernambuco) was a self taught guitarist unable to read or write musical notation. Nevertheless he composed over 100 pieces for guitar in various styles during his career, today many of them ranking among the standard repertoire for guitarists excelling in choro. João Pernambuco is generally considered the originator or founder of the guitar choro, and especially one of his compositions has become popular with guitarists worldwide, the choro-maxixe 'Sons de Carrilhões' (in English: 'Sounds of Bells').
Sons de Carrilhões was recorded by João Pernambuco (violão=guitar) accompanied by Nelson Alves (cavaquinho) for Odeon in 1926 and issued on a 78 rpm disc. A musical notation of the piece was published for the first time in a collection titled 'A Guitarra de Prata' during the 1930s. A revised version by Turibio Santos and a second, revised version by Dilermando Reis were published in 1978. In 1992 these revised versions have been republished by Chanterelle Verlag.

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Giuseppe Gasparini
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Re: D05 Classical guitar lesson 04

Post by Giuseppe Gasparini » Thu Dec 17, 2015 3:45 pm

Hi John,good :bravo: , the stop you do with the little finger of the left, I do not like (everything stops) :bye:

EricKatz
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Re: D05 Classical guitar lesson 04

Post by EricKatz » Thu Dec 17, 2015 9:00 pm

Hello fellow students,

Here are my first recordings of the pieces of lesson 4 (no repeats, as usual). There are still quite a bunch of mistakes and a lot of spots to improve (although I'm also learning to play on as if nothing happened :lol: ). But I'm afraid this is what it is at the moment. The quality of the recordings wasn't getting any better, so it was useless to give it another try. Feel free to comment!

Luys De Narvàez - Tres Diferencias por otra parte

Youtube


Jean-Baptiste Besard - Ballet

Youtube


Giuseppe Antonio Brescianello - Allegro de la Partita VII

Youtube


Matteo Carcassi - Etude XVI opus 60

Youtube


João Guimarães - Sons de carillhões

Youtube

Loiseng Kee
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Re: D05 Classical guitar lesson 04

Post by Loiseng Kee » Fri Dec 18, 2015 11:25 am

:bravo: John n Eric, u guys are excellent!!!! So smoothly, confidently n musically played.
Here is my submission of the sound of bell, its ring wrongly in a few places, :desole:
Pls feel free to comment.... :merci:


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Re: D05 Classical guitar lesson 04

Post by EricKatz » Fri Dec 18, 2015 1:11 pm

Good job, Loiseng!! It really swings and you play at high speed! Did you know the song before?
I didn't mind that few little mistakes. There weren't much, I made a lot more :lol:

I can't come up with suggestions for improvement, other than that maybe you could make a bit more difference in tone and loudness between the accompaniment and the "melody". But that's my personal taste.

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Re: D05 Classical guitar lesson 04

Post by Loiseng Kee » Fri Dec 18, 2015 11:28 pm

Eric de Vries wrote:Good job, Loiseng!! It really swings and you play at high speed! Did you know the song before?
I didn't mind that few little mistakes. There weren't much, I made a lot more :lol:

I can't come up with suggestions for improvement, other than that maybe you could make a bit more difference in tone and loudness between the accompaniment and the "melody". But that's my personal taste.
Dear Eric,
Thanks for ur kind words n all the crucial infomation. This is my firstime learning this music for about 2 weeks. I do lack of dynamic flow n i will take care of the separation of melody n accompaniment. Thanks for ur gentle reminder too!!! :merci:

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John Montes
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Re: D05 Classical guitar lesson 04

Post by John Montes » Mon Dec 21, 2015 3:12 am

Eric de Vries wrote:Here's some interesting background information about the five pieces of lesson 4, I would like to share with you.
Hi Eric,
These are very useful and golden nuggets of background. Many thanks for sharing. :merci:

I wonder if Narvaez may have played some of the Guardame las Vacas variations while in the Netherlands.
Carlos Barbosa-Lima loves to play the Sons de carillhões live, I heard him play a duet version live with Larry Del Casale in November

Very nice playing of the lesson pieces and the extra supplementary pieces. I'd like to learn the additional Narvaez variations before the next lesson if I can get enough practice time. :bravo:
2001 Vicente Carrillo 1a Rio
1998 German Rubio Vazquez Estudio
2015 Cordoba Solista
2012 Cordoba C7
La Bella & D'Addario Strings

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John Montes
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Re: D05 Classical guitar lesson 04

Post by John Montes » Mon Dec 21, 2015 3:50 pm

Loiseng, nice work on the Sons de Carillhões, its a fun composition to play. :bravo:
2001 Vicente Carrillo 1a Rio
1998 German Rubio Vazquez Estudio
2015 Cordoba Solista
2012 Cordoba C7
La Bella & D'Addario Strings

Michele Franceschini
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Re: D05 Classical guitar lesson 04

Post by Michele Franceschini » Mon Dec 21, 2015 4:27 pm

Loiseng, very nicely played, I like the happy sparkling interpretation: I think it suits very well the spirit of this piece. The only suggestion that I have is that I would try and fit in some modulation of tone and volume, (mostly just because it's the guitars and we can :) )

Michele Franceschini
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Re: D05 Classical guitar lesson 04

Post by Michele Franceschini » Mon Dec 21, 2015 4:30 pm

Eric, thank you so much for the background info on music and interpretation history! You're making these so much more than just guitar lessons :)

Michele Franceschini
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Re: D05 Classical guitar lesson 04

Post by Michele Franceschini » Mon Dec 21, 2015 4:35 pm

Eric, I forgot to mention, maybe it's just the camera position, but regarding your posture, from the video you look a bit arched over the guitar and bending on the left (may be just perspective). Are you sitting on a chair/stool with and using a foot rest? Also the right hand I noticed you keep your fingers separated. Most classical guitar players I've seen keep them fairly close (I have no idea if it makes a difference).

Cheers,

Michele

Loiseng Kee
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Re: D05 Classical guitar lesson 04

Post by Loiseng Kee » Fri Dec 25, 2015 12:42 am

Merry Christmas dear all!!!! John n Michele, thanks for the compliment, i will pay more attend in dynamic n tone modulation in future... :merci:

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