D05 Classical guitar lesson 07

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Jean-François Delcamp
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D05 Classical guitar lesson 07

Post by Jean-François Delcamp » Wed Mar 02, 2016 8:53 am

Hello everyone,
Please start by downloading the latest version of volume D05.
If you are new to the course, please read this message to familiarize yourself with the conditions for participating in the lessons. You should also read the first message in lesson 1, where you will find advice on how to make the most of your study time and on the methods of practising that I recommend.




Now we're going to work on a study:
- pages 156, 157 Agustín Barrios Mangoré (1885-1944) Estudio del ligado
Do your best to obtain an even volume whichever way the note is produced, whether by plucking, hammer-on (ascending slur) or pull-off (descending slur). Of these three ways of producing the sound, it is the note produced by the hammer-on (ascending slur) which demands the most energy. When you first start practising this, emphasize the hammer-ons forcefully, while playing the plucked notes and pull-offs gently.

Youtube





Today we'll look at 5 pieces.
- page 5 Alonso Mudarra (1510-1580) Gallarda
I recommend that you stress beats 2 and 3 only lightly, then give full emphasis to beat 1, in order to clearly bring out the stress on the 1st beats, that is to say on all the dotted half notes (dotted minims). The dance ends with hemiolas in bars 22 and 23. In these two bars, the stress changes, falling on each half note (minim).

Youtube



- page 34 Gaspar Sanz (1640-1710) Pavanas Por La D, Con Partidas Al Aire Español
In Gaspar Sanz's time, European guitarists notated chords with a system whereby letters of the alphabet symbolised the positions of the fingers on the fingerboard of the guitar. These finger positions served to produce the usual chords. This system is called "alfabeto italiano": http://www.guitareclassiquedelcamp.com/ ... liano.html. Under this system, the chord of A minor is represented by the letter D. Hence the title of these pavanes in A minor.
In bar 16 you will notice the presence of a double cross or # above the staff. This symbol indicates to the player that he should play the note or notes under the symbol with vibrato.
In the last section, Gaspar Sanz makes frequent use of campanella passages, in order to give an effect of prolonged resonance to the notes of the scales, somewhat in imitation of the harp. I have indicated the fingerings which will allow this harp effect to be achieved in the scales.

Youtube


Youtube



- page 82 Napoléon Coste (1806-1883) Etude I opus 38
While the bass is present throughout on the strong beats, the treble part falls on the weak parts of the beat. Practise phrase by phrase, each phrase starting with an upbeat on the second beat and ending on the first beat. The phrase structure of the study is of 4 bars. Napoléon Coste breaks the phrase structure between bars 24 and 30, and again from the end of bar 38 to bar 43.

Youtube



- page 89 Francisco Tàrrega (1852-1909) Làgrima
Here we are in the presence of a masterpiece of the classical guitar repertoire. This prelude, in the key of E, has a marvellous ringing quality. Tàrrega, as always, makes admirable use of the guitar's possibilities. The only serious technical difficulty concerns bars 5 and 6. In these bars, the barrés require a muscular force which takes a long time to develop, so I suggest an alternative, less demanding fingering without barrés. Bring out the melody in the upper voice by a stronger free stroke, or a rest stroke, on the first string. In bar 9 the acciaccatura (the small note) is produced by rapidly sliding the second finger from the G to the C. This C represented by the small note is followed immediately afterwards by the same C, played with rest or free stroke, as I demonstrate in the following short video.

Youtube


Youtube



Julio Sagreras (1879-1942) Lecciones III n°6
To get an even sound in the triplet slurs, it is necessary to concentrate on the hammer-on. The hammer-on demands energy and concentration, while it is easy to get a clear sound from the pull-off which follows it. Practise these slurs slowly, accentuating the volume of the notes produced by the hammer-ons, as I demonstrate in the following short video extract.

Youtube


Youtube





I ask you first to work on all these exercises and tunes for a week and then to upload your recordings of:
- page 89 Francisco Tàrrega (1852-1909) Làgrima
Julio Sagreras (1879-1942) Leccione III n°6




Good luck!


I thank Geoff (GeoffB) who has helped in the translation of my lessons into English.


Jean-François


Exam qualifying submissions: :
Francisco Tàrrega (1852-1909) Làgrima
Julio Sagreras (1879-1942) Lecciones III n°6

Loiseng Kee
Francisco Tàrrega (1852-1909) Làgrima
Julio Sagreras (1879-1942) Lecciones III n°6

Eric de Vries
Francisco Tàrrega (1852-1909) Làgrima
Julio Sagreras (1879-1942) Lecciones III n°6

John Montes
Francisco Tàrrega (1852-1909) Làgrima
Julio Sagreras (1879-1942) Lecciones III n°6

Satyajit Kadle
Francisco Tàrrega (1852-1909) Làgrima
Julio Sagreras (1879-1942) Lecciones III n°6

Michele Franceschini
Francisco Tàrrega (1852-1909) Làgrima
Julio Sagreras (1879-1942) Lecciones III n°6

Håvard.Bergene
Francisco Tàrrega (1852-1909) Làgrima
Julio Sagreras (1879-1942) Lecciones III n°6
:( + ♫ = :)

EricKatz
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Re: D05 Classical guitar lesson 07

Post by EricKatz » Wed Mar 02, 2016 9:42 am

What books, internet and CD-covers tells us...

Alonso Mudarra (1510-1580) Gallarda
The gaillard was a Renaissance dance form that was very popular all over Europe in the 16th century. It is an athletic dance, characterised by leaps, jumps and hops. The Gaillard was generally paired with the slow processional dance Pavan (the slow dance first). Mudarra's Gaillard was meant to be played after the "Pavana de Alexandre", a piece we will learn in D06.
At the age of 36 years Mudarra became a priest and was installed as canon of the cathedral of Sevilla.

Gaspar Sanz (1640-1710) Pavanas Por La D, Con Partidas Al Aire Español
Our second composer of this lesson, Sanz, was also a priest. Born to a wealthy family, he was baptized as Francisco Bartolome Sanz y Celma, but later adopted the first name "Gaspar". He studied music, theology and philosophy at the University of Salamanca, where he was later appointed Professor of Music.
This "Pavane with variations in the Spanish manner" is from the second volume of his three part master work for baroque guitar "Instruccion de musica sobre la guitarra espanola".
In the lesson book, there's seems to be something wrong in measure 32. I guess that it must be just like m.16. First we play a whole note, the second time around it's a dotted half note, followed by the upbeat of the next variation.
The barline after a-A is confusing. The a-A under number 2 must be considered as the first beat of m.33, which has only three quarter notes.

[However, in the video the structure A-A-B-B-C from the score has turned into A-B-C-B. In m.16 the bar with the whole note (under number 1) is skipped. Professor Delcamp just plays the dotted half note immediately followed by the quarter note. In m. 32 he also plays straight on and skips the dotted note in the bar under number 1. And then at the end of the piece (m.49) he plays a dotted note instead of a whole note and then starts a repeat beginning with the quarter note of m.16 and ending with m.32 (this time a whole note). Maybe this is what's meant by variations in a Spanish manner ;-))]

Napoléon Coste (1805-1883) Etude I opus 38
One of the great 19th century guitar composers that didn't live abroad! Most of Coste's work was forgotten after he died, but his Op.38 became well known and widely appreciated. Study no. 1 is dedicated to mister E. Petetin, pupil of Coste and later his son in law. In his recent PhD-dissertation about Coste, Van Vliet says Petetin must have been a very mediocrate player, because the low difficulty-grade of this study. Ay, that hurts for us poor D05-students! Maybe it's easy when you use the simple and elegant fingering of Coste, but you must be a pretty good player to make the weird fingering in the lesson book sound nice. http://imslp.org/wiki/25_Etudes_for_Gui ... l%C3%A9on)
All these studies were composed by Coste for seven-string guitar. The first bass notes of m.7 and m.37 were originally an octave lower, so the descending bass line now makes a strange jump at the end. The tempo indication of the original is bpm=112, which IMO does fit much better to the character of the piece.
The demonstration video has a lot of rubato and a lazy, romantic atmosphere. But with a bit more pepper and a good sense of rhythm Coste's etudes suddenly sound surprisingly modern. Sometimes I hear a few bars that could have been played by Ry Cooder, Tommy Emmanuel, Harry Sacksioni or Leo Kottke (best example: Etude nr. 2 on p.78-79 of the lesson book, from bar 9 on!). If you really want to get a good impression of the superb quality of Coste's Op.38, I advise to listen to Jeffrey McFadden's rendition (Coste: Guitar Works Vol.4, Naxos; also on Spotify).

Francisco Tàrrega (1852-1909) Làgrima
This famous piece was written by Tarrega when he was abroad, on one of his tours, in London. As many pieces, it was not published during his lifetime. He used it in manuscript form as student material. First it was just named "Preludio", but after hearing it his student Walter Leckie immediately came up with the name Lagrima (Teardrop).
When Tarrega died, the manuscript was not in his legacy. But then Pujol discovered a unknown manuscript of Tarrega, owned by an amateur guitarist in Reus (Spain). He handed it over to the Tarrega family, who had it printed in 1914 (Buenos Aires) and later in Madrid. This version had two parts and it would became the standard version.
But although Lagrima sounds so familiar to us nowadays, it seems that we are playing an incomplete version. In 1911 Leckie gave the Lagrima manuscript he got from Tarrega to Domingo Pratt during the latter's visit to Marseille. This was a THREE part manuscript! The section that had been "lost" is actually the second part. The structure of the Pratt-version is AA-BB-A-CC-A (A being the E major-part; B being the "new" part; C being the e minor part). Pratt published it in 1924 in Buenos Aires. You can listen to the Pratt version, performed by our forum member Jürgen Schenk: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uR4z74y8XJg
For more details about the history of Lagrima: viewtopic.php?f=1&t=8343&p=76896&hilit= ... art#p76896

Julio Sagreras (1879-1942) Lecciones III n°6
In his method Sagreras writes: "This study in the form of a ranchera (a few years ago it would have been called a mazurka, for in reality that is exactly what it is) is composed of slurred triplets. In these I recommend that the first note of the triplet is held very firmly, since that is the one which has to withstand the descending part of the ligado. I recommend yet again that in the second section, which is in thirds and sixths, the fingers of the left hand should slide in all those places where slides are indicated. The accents marked should be strictly observed."

Loiseng Kee
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Re: D05 Classical guitar lesson 07

Post by Loiseng Kee » Sun Mar 13, 2016 4:33 pm

:merci: Eric, Ur information provided were always helpful!!!

Dear pals,
Here is my submission as usual, pls help to comment!!! :merci: :casque:

Lagrima

Youtube


Lecion 6

Youtube

EricKatz
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Re: D05 Classical guitar lesson 07

Post by EricKatz » Tue Mar 15, 2016 1:35 pm

Hello Loiseng,

As usual I'm surprised how little time you need to study these pieces and play them quite well. :bravo: BRAVO
I'm also happy to see that your finger has cured.

Here's some feed back on Lagrima.
First of all, maybe you can bring out the melody line (upper notes) in Lagrima a bit more. For example, the B-string sounds very loud in relation to the melody notes. Why did you play the second part suddenly a lot faster? I'm glad you calmed down in the repeat.
In m.9 the appogiatura sounds strange. I would advice to play G, tright after that you glide to the 8th fret and than you play C exactly on the second half of beat one.

I get the impression that you add some reverb to your recording. Of course it makes your recording sound better, more like a pro. :casque: For these on line lessons it's not a good idea. It's becomes almost impossible to hear if chords changes are smooth and without hesitations and melody lines are played legato.

Leccion #6 is very good. Here also the melody and the accompaniment could be a biot better separated. For instance, in m.29 the second and third notes sound just as loud as the first one (F).

See you in lesson 8!

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Re: D05 Classical guitar lesson 07

Post by EricKatz » Tue Mar 15, 2016 1:39 pm

Hello fellow students,

Here are my submissions. As usual, comments are very welcome!

Francisco Tàrrega - Làgrima

Youtube


Julio Sagreras Lecciones III n°6

Youtube


Alonso Mudarra - Gallarda

Youtube


Gaspar Sanz - Pavanas Por La D, Con Partidas Al Aire Español

Youtube


Napoléon Coste - Etude I opus 38

Youtube

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Marko Räsänen
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Re: D05 Classical guitar lesson 07

Post by Marko Räsänen » Tue Mar 15, 2016 9:33 pm

:bravo: Eric!

Your Coste and Mudarra were very musically played. Enjoyable to listen to despite the small mistakes! :casque:
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John Montes
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Re: D05 Classical guitar lesson 07

Post by John Montes » Wed Mar 16, 2016 12:46 am

Yep, Loiseng was first out of the gate again with the first submissions :-)
Nicely played by the way Loiseng, the comments Eric provided will take the interpretations/polish up an extra level .

Eric came in with the mother-load of interesting background musicological nuggets + the full breadth of lesson submissions.
Nicely played as well
--I definitely want to add the 3rd segment of the Lagrima to my future performances of Lagrima, Jurgens does a fine job in his video.

This weekend I should have my remaining L6 videos posted and most if not all L7
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Loiseng Kee
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Re: D05 Classical guitar lesson 07

Post by Loiseng Kee » Wed Mar 16, 2016 3:36 am

Hi Eric,
Thanks for ur advice n pointers. It really helped me to know my weakness n play better in future. I enjoyed ur extra submission always!!!! I thought adding slight reverb can ease my audiences in listening, but it actually quite distracted?! Hehe... I will take note of it...

Hi John,
Thanks for listen to my playing n also ur gentle reminder for polishing my playing. Hope to listen to u soon yo!!!

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John Montes
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Re: D05 Classical guitar lesson 07

Post by John Montes » Tue Mar 22, 2016 4:25 am

Tarrega's Lagrima

Youtube
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Satyajit Kadle
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Re: D05 Classical guitar lesson 07

Post by Satyajit Kadle » Tue Mar 22, 2016 11:14 am

Nice listening to all your postings.

@John,
1) In the minor section, you play the G twice before sliding. I think it's to be played once, then we slide to C, then play C again.

2) In bar 13, the first chord should be G and not G sharp as the upper note.

I find that I can play the first beats of the 5th bar only if I lift my 3rd finger. It's Interesting, the number of ways we can play this measure.

EricKatz
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Re: D05 Classical guitar lesson 07

Post by EricKatz » Tue Mar 22, 2016 12:26 pm

Hello John,
I enjoyed listening to your Lagrima, because of the good tone and the balanced voices. :casque: But there were also some strange things happening. Satyajit made some good observations. I like to add a few.
In m.13 you also sharpened the G natural in the third bass note.
In m.10 you slow down so much that the eight notes are played at 50% of their duration, and in the next two measures you seem to hurry. Maybe this is an intended rubato, but IMO it doesn't work. :cry: The changes are too extreme and what's more important, they distract from the ritardando the composer has written at the end of each section.

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Re: D05 Classical guitar lesson 07

Post by John Montes » Wed Mar 23, 2016 1:52 am

thanks for the feedback, just got home after a long day, will re-look at the score and comments and possibly re-post later tonight :-)
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Re: D05 Classical guitar lesson 07

Post by John Montes » Wed Mar 23, 2016 4:29 am

2nd take, sorry for the sloppy sight-read and other issues on the 1st take

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Re: D05 Classical guitar lesson 07

Post by EricKatz » Wed Mar 23, 2016 10:07 am

Hi John,
Great improvement! :bravo: I really appreciate that you post second recordings. I think that's how professor Delcamp meant it to be, but most students - including myself - don't do that.
However, there's quite a lot of slowing down and speeding up in the B-section. When I'm tapping along with my foot, I simply don't get in the groove. Maybe you should play along with the metronome before thinking about adding rubato?

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Rick Beauregard
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Re: D05 Classical guitar lesson 07

Post by Rick Beauregard » Wed Mar 23, 2016 5:16 pm

Really nicely played, John! I concur with Eric regarding tempo. I thought the A section was a tad quick (for my taste) so if you slow that down a bit, you have it!
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