Sunburst by Andrew York

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Sunburst by Andrew York

Postby laihinchun » Sat Jul 18, 2009 3:12 am

I've been stuck in this plateau for almost 3 years. The hammering part in Sunburst.
My lefthand is fast enough but my right hand is not. My thumb always catch up on the string.
I just cannot concentrate on both hands, like whenever I concentrate on one, I mess up with the other hand.
Well I really want to overcome this, but I just don't know the method.

I couldn't ask my teacher because after I moved 3 years ago I haven't found another teacher yet.
Plus somehow I thought he's teaching method wasn't very correct ( He said scales are not important, so I never practiced any scales in CG)

Can somebody please give me an advice on the piece Sunburst, and suggest a scale book, a detailed scale collection like Carl Flesch Scale System for Violin ?

That book contains over hundreds of scales.

Thnx =]
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Re: Sunburst by Andrew York

Postby canoe man » Sat Jul 18, 2009 6:33 am

Which measures are giving you fits. The start of that section is fairly straight forward, the third position scales passages that come later can be more challenging and may need a different approach for you.
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Re: Sunburst by Andrew York

Postby bobtone » Sat Jul 18, 2009 7:12 am

Well, first, if one hand is distracting the other, then we need to methodically eliminate that problem.

With the hammer-on and pull-off parts, the left hand should be able to do this effortlessly like breathing. (easily said).

Playing scales will help your left hand immensely. It is like super food for both hands. Take for instance, the Segovia scales-- or any scales for that matter. Play them every day, loud and clean, with all combinations of right hand-- MA, AI, IM, PI, PM, PA, IMA, MAMI, and make a few more combinations up. Play them vigorously every day. How long is up to you.

After a while the left hand will just breeze through passages and those dreaded hammer-ons and pull-offs. Thus the brain is free to concentrate on the right hand now.
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Re: Sunburst by Andrew York

Postby JonL » Sat Jul 18, 2009 8:33 am

laihinchun wrote: I couldn't ask my teacher because after I moved 3 years ago I haven't found another teacher yet.
Plus somehow I thought he's teaching method wasn't very correct ( He said scales are not important, so I never practiced any scales in CG)

Can somebody please give me an advice on the piece Sunburst, and suggest a scale book, a detailed scale collection like Carl Flesch Scale System for Violin ?

That book contains over hundreds of scales.

Thnx =]


If you want to be good a playing scales then practice scales. If you want to be good at playing Sunburst then I suggest you practice Sunburst! :)
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Re: Sunburst by Andrew York

Postby philparker » Sat Jul 18, 2009 4:56 pm

Well, I agree with the above comment - and this advice may sound very simple, but learn it at a very slow pace so that each note can be clearly heard, keep playing it over and over so that each note can be clearly heard, you will know you are going too fast when the notes become mashed up - but eventually it will fall into place!!

I personally don't believe learning this scale or that scale will make any difference to learning Sunburst - it must also be within your technical capability, determination and perseverance will not overcome a piece that you are not yet ready for.
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Re: Sunburst by Andrew York

Postby canoe man » Sat Jul 18, 2009 6:59 pm

I have over the years used a P m or a P i variant for those, when my thumb was not cooperating, mostly do to changing my nail shape and length for benefiting other music. In any event if you experiment with variations take them dead slow to get the muscle memory ingrained. Sunburst must not be all that tough, I can play it.
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Re: Sunburst by Andrew York

Postby oompaloompa » Fri Jul 24, 2009 7:59 pm

Have you tried practicing the RH separately, slowly and cleanly, without the left?

It may also help to break the hammer-on section into smaller segments, separated by each chord change. I find it helpful to play up until each chord change at tempo, and then pause at each chord change, with both left and right hands fully prepared (fingers on both hands touching the strings in position for the next chord). After pausing, continue at tempo until the next chord change, etc.
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Re: Sunburst by Andrew York

Postby Steve Kutzer » Fri Jul 24, 2009 8:10 pm

Have you written all LH and RH fingerings and are you practicing those exact fingerings each and every time? Not doing that can be a big cause for my stumbles. I wing it and think I'm doing it the same, but come around to noticing that I am not.
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Re: Sunburst by Andrew York

Postby canoe man » Sun Jul 26, 2009 6:49 am

Two things I did not think of before. One with the down slurs most of those are not all that forceful of a pull off, but I get cleaner slurs if the right hand work is done closer to the bridge. Less string wobble to capture, I guess. Two. I am better if I do not over think the fast mini scales and treat them as individual workouts. The shifts between them are not difficult, which would allow more repetitive work on each trouble spot. Watch yourself though. Left hand fatigue can set in rather quickly doing this.
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