D01 Classical guitar lesson 01

The classical guitar lessons are free. They are aimed at the isolated amateur who does not have access to a teacher. To join the class, apply for registration into the students group.
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The classical guitar lessons are free. They are aimed at the isolated amateur who does not have access to a teacher. To join the class, apply for registration into the students group.

PDF, MP3, Vidéos, Lessons : Level D01 - Level D02 - Level D03 - Level D04 - Level D05 - Level D06 - Level D07 - Level D08 - Level D09 - Level D10 - Level D11 - Level D12.
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James A. Showalter
Student of the online lessons
Posts: 78
Joined: Wed Mar 15, 2017 10:20 pm
Location: Mississippi

Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 01

Post by James A. Showalter » Mon Oct 02, 2017 10:30 pm

That's a good push Grayson. I try practicing my lessons on my steel string guitars and it is much harder. It takes more hand strength and imperfections are more distinct. Now a constructive observation: When you reach the 4th note in Il Est Minuet (changing from the G-note to the F#) you use the same finger (the M) to play each note. The score shows that you should change from the M to the I-finger at this point. Consciously making the change may help you to express the F# note more clearly and eliminate the resulting buzz you are experiencing.

Stay with us. We'll all get there.
James
1990 Takamine C132S
2014 Sakurai Kohno Pro-J
Martin Guitars (D28, MC28, D12-28, J-40)
National Resonator Guitar
Les Paul

Kazuyuki Kuhara
Student of the online lessons
Posts: 43
Joined: Sun Jun 04, 2017 9:45 am
Location: Singapore

Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 01

Post by Kazuyuki Kuhara » Tue Oct 03, 2017 1:29 pm

Hi Grayson,
Nice work! :D
I think, there are couple notes are out of timing but overall delivered well.
Other than that, I noticed same point as James.
Try using finger alternate will helps you more smooth delivery, once you get used to do.
(I'm often keep using same finger, especially when I practice new scales and too much focus left hand fingerling then I use same finger intentionally...)
Try paying attention for thisright hand alternate fingerling is worth in future step. :bravo:
------------------------------------
- Yamaha C40
- Alhambra 3C (my wife's one)
- Antonio Picado Mod.54 2004

Craig McCallum
Student of the online lessons
Posts: 23
Joined: Sun Jan 15, 2017 11:23 pm
Location: Edinburgh, Scotland

Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 01

Post by Craig McCallum » Tue Oct 03, 2017 10:18 pm

Hello folks,

A quick introduction from me - I'm Craig, and I'm rejoining the lessons for the year. I'm a returning classical guitarist, having played to a decent level back in High School (nearly 20 years since I played classical) - I signed up for the Delcamp lessons back in February, but didn't keep them up, and decided to leave it until the new term started in September to jump back in. I've got back to practising lesson 1 this week, I'll hopefully start getting videos up next week :)

I've not read the whole thread, but read the last couple of pages - glad to see it seems to be a keen group.

Grayson - your videos are a great start, but one bit of feedback I'd offer is your left hand seems a bit rotated on Old McDonald and Il Est Minuet, which is giving you quite a lot of work to do getting your 2nd and 3rd fingers to the frets since they're placed further away than they could be. Your palm seems very close to the bottom of the neck as well (although that could be because of the guitar being a steel string, since they tend to have narrower necks). This YouTube video is worth a watch for some tips on left hand placement (their whole series on posture is worth a watch in fact - they helped me out when I was coming back to things earlier in the year, and I'm planning on re-watching them again this week as I settle myself back into practicing).


Youtube

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James A. Showalter
Student of the online lessons
Posts: 78
Joined: Wed Mar 15, 2017 10:20 pm
Location: Mississippi

Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 01

Post by James A. Showalter » Tue Oct 03, 2017 10:40 pm

Craig,
Thank you for joining this group. This video should be a required resource for all beginning classical guitarists. I'm looking forward to your lesson contributions.

James
1990 Takamine C132S
2014 Sakurai Kohno Pro-J
Martin Guitars (D28, MC28, D12-28, J-40)
National Resonator Guitar
Les Paul

Angela Carter
Student of the online lessons
Posts: 20
Joined: Mon Oct 02, 2017 4:38 am

Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 01

Post by Angela Carter » Wed Oct 04, 2017 12:20 am

Craig, Thank you for posting the video. He explained the hand position very clearly.

Also, Hello to everyone. It is great to see everyone's videos. I am just starting the class. Ihad a couple of months of lessons many years ago so I expected to just fly through the first week of assignments. Yeah, turns out that was just wishful thinking on my part. :wink:

Angela Carter
Student of the online lessons
Posts: 20
Joined: Mon Oct 02, 2017 4:38 am

Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 01

Post by Angela Carter » Wed Oct 04, 2017 12:48 am

Hey everyone. I have a few questions. What does the flower mean? Is that when you should dampen a note? And how do you know which plucking method to use? Any help is appreciated. Thanks

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James A. Showalter
Student of the online lessons
Posts: 78
Joined: Wed Mar 15, 2017 10:20 pm
Location: Mississippi

Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 01

Post by James A. Showalter » Wed Oct 04, 2017 1:07 am

Hello Angela, and welcome to this ever growing band of pickers.

Yes, the asterisk (flower) means to damp the previous note while the (\) and then a number (e.g. \3) tells which finger to use to achieve the damping. The letter below the score tells which finger to use for plucking the note (P, I, M or A). But I am such a novice that I am not sure if it's picking or plucking or if it's a musical score or scale so I recommend that you read the description written by Maestro Delcamp at the front of the D01 lesson.

This group is getting quite a bit more interesting each day with the addition of individuals like yourself who have had some degree of experience at classical guitar. I'm just a picker from south Mississippi with no experience but I am really appreciating my involvement with this group. We are one month into this lesson and all of us are gaining with each day. I am looking forward to your lesson submissions.

I think we will receive new lesson assignments tomorrow.
James
1990 Takamine C132S
2014 Sakurai Kohno Pro-J
Martin Guitars (D28, MC28, D12-28, J-40)
National Resonator Guitar
Les Paul

Timothy Morgan
Student of the online lessons
Posts: 24
Joined: Thu Sep 07, 2017 7:22 pm
Location: Lafayette, LA. USA

Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 01

Post by Timothy Morgan » Wed Oct 04, 2017 3:41 pm

Hello everyone. I have been away yet again, last weekend was the opening of bow season here in South Louisiana so I was out in the marsh after venison! But, I am back. Welcome to Juan, and Angela!
1995 Alvarez Artist 5003
2009 Taylor 114e
1974 Epiphone Caballero FT-130 SB

Kazuyuki Kuhara
Student of the online lessons
Posts: 43
Joined: Sun Jun 04, 2017 9:45 am
Location: Singapore

Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 01

Post by Kazuyuki Kuhara » Wed Oct 04, 2017 10:45 pm

Hi Craig and Angela,
Welcome on board!
:discussion:
------------------------------------
- Yamaha C40
- Alhambra 3C (my wife's one)
- Antonio Picado Mod.54 2004

User avatar
James A. Showalter
Student of the online lessons
Posts: 78
Joined: Wed Mar 15, 2017 10:20 pm
Location: Mississippi

Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 01

Post by James A. Showalter » Thu Oct 05, 2017 12:16 am

A little antsy here.

Like Tim I'm anticipating being drawn into my annual extra-curricular activity and then a bit of travel for work. So when we get the next lesson which I was anticipating would be today I'm going in head first at whatever level I can record it. That ought to be a good canvas for critique on how to do it better. I'll be distracted until probably New Years but then I'll be able to settle into a regular practice routine and catch up with the group.

It will be nice to observe how the more experienced among us play. I'm looking forward to it.
1990 Takamine C132S
2014 Sakurai Kohno Pro-J
Martin Guitars (D28, MC28, D12-28, J-40)
National Resonator Guitar
Les Paul

Juan M Silva
Student of the online lessons
Posts: 10
Joined: Tue Sep 26, 2017 5:56 pm
Location: Covina

Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 01

Post by Juan M Silva » Thu Oct 05, 2017 12:28 am

Hi classmates,
Here are my videos for lesson 01. All and any comments are appreciated.
Warm Regards,
Juan

Youtube


Youtube


Youtube

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James A. Showalter
Student of the online lessons
Posts: 78
Joined: Wed Mar 15, 2017 10:20 pm
Location: Mississippi

Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 01

Post by James A. Showalter » Thu Oct 05, 2017 12:58 pm

That is very nice work Juan. A couple of mistakes in timing and execution which can be remedied by more practice and re-doing. I do have one observation and I ask that you review the comments from John Montes when he reviewed my submissions for these lessons. He described the preferred right-hand technique where the wrist did not move during execution. It appears you are doing the same thing as me by relocating the right hand to execute action of the thumb. I am exploring how I can get more stable with my right hand and have modified my posture and hold on the instrument to accommodate the difficulty for me. My changes will be obvious when I submit my next lessons. I'm not sure why you are moving your wrist so much when you use your thumb. That is my observation.

James
1990 Takamine C132S
2014 Sakurai Kohno Pro-J
Martin Guitars (D28, MC28, D12-28, J-40)
National Resonator Guitar
Les Paul

Juan M Silva
Student of the online lessons
Posts: 10
Joined: Tue Sep 26, 2017 5:56 pm
Location: Covina

Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 01

Post by Juan M Silva » Thu Oct 05, 2017 6:52 pm

James A. Showalter wrote:
Thu Oct 05, 2017 12:58 pm
I'm not sure why you are moving your wrist so much when you use your thumb. That is my observation.

James
Thank you for the comment James. I will review the comment John Montes left for you as well. That is a very good observation, and I will work ion it. I found that returning to the previous position, it is a bit difficult to find the place. This is where most mistakes were happening during the recordings. Had to start over many times exactly at this point. It never even occurred to me to stay in position, which would have made sense.

Regards,
Juan

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James A. Showalter
Student of the online lessons
Posts: 78
Joined: Wed Mar 15, 2017 10:20 pm
Location: Mississippi

Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 01

Post by James A. Showalter » Thu Oct 05, 2017 11:21 pm

Juan,
If you go to Craig's post above you can watch the video he embedded which does a very good job of explaining position for the left hand. After I viewed it the follow-on page gave a link to a similar video explaning position for the right hand. Of course the description by Maestro Delcamp should be the fundamental for what we are learning from this lesson set.
James
1990 Takamine C132S
2014 Sakurai Kohno Pro-J
Martin Guitars (D28, MC28, D12-28, J-40)
National Resonator Guitar
Les Paul

Craig McCallum
Student of the online lessons
Posts: 23
Joined: Sun Jan 15, 2017 11:23 pm
Location: Edinburgh, Scotland

Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 01

Post by Craig McCallum » Fri Oct 06, 2017 10:39 pm

Hi Juan,

They're sounding good :)

To even up the timing a little, can I ask if you've ever practised with a metronome? I'd highly recommend getting a little cheap one, or downloading a metronome app for your phone.

How I generally use it (as recommended a long time back) is to play each phrase very, very slowly to begin with - as slowly as you need to play it to get both the notes & the timing 100% correct, and can do it 3 times in a row. Only once you've done that do you move onto the next phrase... if you are still making mistakes, or can't get the timing, slow the metronome down by 5 or 6 beats per minute and try it again.

Once you can get each phrase correct 3 times in a row at that speed, speed the metronome up a bit - not too much, maybe as little as 5 or 6 bpm at a time. Again, you're aiming for 100% accuracy 3 or 4 times in a row. If find you can't get it, bring the speed back down again.

The idea is that, rather than the more commonly use 'practice makes perfect', or more correct to say 'practice makes permanent' - if we play the piece too quickly and make the same mistake each time, all we're doing is training our fingers to keep making that mistake... so better to play slowly and accurately, and only build up the speed once our fingers are doing the right thing.

Doing this, you can gradually build up towards the speeds on the sheet music. I started at about 70bpm for Old Macdonald, and am getting up towards the 150bpm by following this method (we'll see if I've actually got there by the time I record videos next week...)

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