D02 Classical guitar lesson 08

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Jean-François Delcamp
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D02 Classical guitar lesson 08

Post by Jean-François Delcamp » Wed Mar 22, 2017 7:54 am

Hello everyone,
Please start by downloading the latest version of volume D02.
If you are new to the course, please read this message to familiarize yourself with the conditions for participating in the lessons. You should also read the first message in lesson 1, where you will find advice on how to make the most of your study time and on the methods of practising that I recommend.




First we will study some technical exercises from volume D02.
- page 77 Jean-François DELCAMP (1956) GAMMES - SCALE - SCALES – ESCALAS
When changes of position are needed, you will be using the "position shift" technique. The position shift involves moving the left hand along the neck, from position to position, from fret to fret. Position shifts are shown by oblique lines linking two fingering indications given for the same finger.
Concentrate your practice on the passages highlighted in yellow, and do your best to perfect the position shift technique.

Youtube


- page 80 Jean-François DELCAMP (1956) LIAISONS - LEGATURE - SLURS - LIGADOS
Ascending slurs are produced by striking (hammering down on) the string with a left hand finger. The faster and more decisive this movement is, the more volume is obtained. Practise particularly on the nylon (unwound) strings, as these are the most difficult to get a clear sound from.

Youtube


- page 82 number 34 Jean-François DELCAMP (1956) ARPÈGES - ARPEGGI - ARPEGGIOS – ARPEGIOS

Youtube


- page 86 6/ Improvise using only 6 notes (D E G A B C) for 20'.

Youtube


Youtube





Next we'll work on five pieces :
- page 35 Johann-Philipp KRIEGER (1652-1735) MENUET
- page 37 Henry PURCELL (1659-1695) MENUET Z. 649
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hemiola

Youtube


Youtube


The Tarentela and the 2 Villanos are played using strums with the index finger. The arrows indicate the direction of the strum. In the strum, several strings are struck in rapid succession, to give the effect of a chord, that is to say of notes played simultaneously.

- page 43 Gaspar SANZ (1640-1710) LA TARENTELA
In bars 1, 2, 4, 5 and 8 the thumb rests on the 6th string. In bars 3, 6 and 7 the thumb rests on the 5th string. It is important not to move the hand while the index finger moves up and down. Resting the thumb on a bass string helps to keep the hand still. It also prevents the accidental sounding of one or more bass strings that are not used in certain chords.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tarantella

Youtube


- page 49 Gaspar SANZ (1640-1710) 2 VILLANOS
2 Villanos: While the index finger is playing the strums, the thumb rests on the 5th string. Except when the chord of A major is being played, where the thumb rests on the 6th string.

Youtube



I ask you first to work on all these exercises and pieces for one week and then to post your recordings on the forum for:
- page 80 number 25 Jean-François DELCAMP (1956) LIAISONS - LEGATURE - SLURS - LIGADOS
- page 86 6/ Improvise using only 6 notes (D E G A B C) for 20'.
- page 35 Johann-Philipp KRIEGER (1652-1735) MENUET
- page 43 Gaspar SANZ (1640-1710) LA TARENTELA



Good luck!


I thank Geoff (GeoffB) who has helped in the translation of my lessons into English.


Jean-François

---

Exam qualifying submissions:

LIAISONS - LEGATURE - SLURS - LIGADOS
Improvise using only 6 notes (D E G A B C) for 20'.
KRIEGER MENUET
LA TARENTELA

David Florea
KRIEGER MENUET
LA TARENTELA

Jenni Gribble
LIAISONS - LEGATURE - SLURS - LIGADOS
KRIEGER MENUET
LA TARENTELA
Improvise using only 6 notes (D E G A B C) for 20'.
:( + ♫ = :)

Colin Bullock
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Re: D02 Classical guitar lesson 08

Post by Colin Bullock » Fri Mar 31, 2017 7:10 am

Hi everyone
Can I ask everyone to check here viewtopic.php?f=41&t=106993#p1181444 that the list confirms your submissions up to end Wednesday 29th.
Let me know if I have missed any of your submissions, or if they are not appearing on the list.
You will need the blue 'qualifies for exam' before you can enter.

See also Exam Discussion by John viewtopic.php?f=41&t=111792 to ensure you are ready for the exam.
Thanks
Colin

Salvatore Lovinello
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Re: D02 Classical guitar lesson 08

Post by Salvatore Lovinello » Wed Apr 05, 2017 11:54 am

Does anyone want to talk about the elephant in the room? I'm talking the baroque ornaments in the menuets. As my wife explained it to me the maestro plays passing tones and turns during the repeats in the Krieger. I looked for a discussion in last year's D02 lesson 8 class and I didn't see any. Is there a convention to follow? Can I play what I want? Is there a previous discussion somewhere? What, if anything, do the passing tones and turns have to do with a hemiola?

Salvatore Lovinello
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Re: D02 Classical guitar lesson 08

Post by Salvatore Lovinello » Wed Apr 05, 2017 1:05 pm

Collin,

Will you be posting the final exam piece here? Last year, being new, I didn't get the final exam song until a few days before the due date. Aside from the stress that caused I know I could have far better with more lead time for practice. Thanks

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Jonathan Lamb
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Re: D02 Classical guitar lesson 08

Post by Jonathan Lamb » Wed Apr 05, 2017 1:39 pm

Hi Sal, and esteemed D02 classmates,
I'm sorry that I haven't had an opportunity to spot the 'elephant' in the trills, yet. I trust this message finds you alive & kicking.
Unfortunately I've just been subject to a rather drastic life change - namely the break-up of my (former) Amsterdam life. I'm (temporarily) back at mum's basement. Now to play catch-up....
Best,
Jonathan

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Jonathan Lamb
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Re: D02 Classical guitar lesson 08

Post by Jonathan Lamb » Wed Apr 05, 2017 1:44 pm

Hemiola: "Nellie the Elephant packed her (trunk)"

Colin Bullock
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Re: D02 Classical guitar lesson 08

Post by Colin Bullock » Wed Apr 05, 2017 8:58 pm

Salvatore Lovinello wrote:Collin,

Will you be posting the final exam piece here? Last year, being new, I didn't get the final exam song until a few days before the due date. Aside from the stress that caused I know I could have far better with more lead time for practice. Thanks
If it's the same as last year it will be posted here http://www.guitarraclasicadelcamp.com/v ... 81d62ee57b
John, Marko & I will try to give an alert when we see it, which should be about 4 weeks before your exam date.

Salvatore Lovinello
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Re: D02 Classical guitar lesson 08

Post by Salvatore Lovinello » Thu Apr 06, 2017 1:49 pm

Jonathan,
Very sorry to hear about your temporary set back. Don't forget to do a load of wash for your mum every now and then.

Listen to the repeats in the Kreiger. Maestro Delcamp is adding passing tones, notes that aren't written, to the score. These are not hemiolas as defined by the wikipedia link. In other words there is not a perfect fifth difference in pitch nor are there three notes played in the space of two. I believe them to be passing tones, with no turns as my wife suggested, in the first three measures of the first repeat and a trill added to the 7th measure. These are baroque ornaments. Am I making a semantic argument or am I missing something.

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Jonathan Lamb
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Re: D02 Classical guitar lesson 08

Post by Jonathan Lamb » Thu Apr 06, 2017 11:22 pm

Wow, Sal I think you're worrying too much. *but I think I can understand why
Here's why: Our noble professeur always plays our lesson pieces with great accomplishment, he leads us to appreciate "each tucked string" for what it can be and is. Hence, we play monotonic children's tune and we think it's GREAT (which it is). For a counter-example, search the forum for an accomplished player who is not actually trying to teach us anything, and see how devilish the whole thing looks... e.g., watch forum video posted by member valère, to see damping in action! (My personal hobby horse du jour). So M. Delcamp wishes us, I feel, to realize that though it's only level D02, it's still 2 years of our lives we've'lived and learnt, and real music for that... let him add a flourish here and there to deepen our experience.(It wouldn't be the first time, if I'm not mistaken)
Secondly, the book D02 contains all sorts of bits and bobs that we hardly have time to look at. More than the 10-mins-a-day muscle and coordination training as recommended by your tutor... generous, to say the least. Think back to the Villanos at the end of D01, and interpretation of ancient tablatures, really trippy as well as complex in expression. Did I fix a capo? Did I hell! Third, on a slightly more personal note, I find your improvisations totally awesome, and distinguished to boot... why not approach the ornaments with that sensibility? Vive la Liberté! We'll find a way, and thanks for :casque:

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Re: D02 Classical guitar lesson 08

Post by Salvatore Lovinello » Fri Apr 07, 2017 1:39 pm

Jonathan.

I think I found Waldo... In the Krieger the hemiolas happen in measures 5 and 20. In all of the other measures the beat is simply 1 e 2 e 3 e while in the noted measures the beat changes to One two three Four five six (accents on One and Four). I think Maestro could have made this much clearer if he had grouped the last three eighth notes together as in the example I have attached.

The ornament that Maestro embellishes the repeats with are historically accurate to baroque music. It is defined in music theory as passing tones, trills and turns with a specific formula. It's more than a matter of improvisation. Looking at previous 02 years no one is playing different notes than the Maestro's.

Thanks for your kind encouragement, Jonathan.

Sal

PS The second notation in the attachment should have read, "what the Maestro should *have* written"
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Re: D02 Classical guitar lesson 08

Post by Salvatore Lovinello » Fri Apr 07, 2017 2:23 pm

While I'm at it the Purcell has some errors as well. Measures 5 and 18 have 2 half notes in the baseline that should be quarter notes. No hemiolas in this one.
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Jonathan Lamb
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Re: D02 Classical guitar lesson 08

Post by Jonathan Lamb » Fri Apr 07, 2017 2:55 pm

I'm sorry but I don't agree, Sal. Heroic try! Meanwhile, I'll be darned if I can get my fingers to do those wonderful ornaments... yet.... yet...

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Re: D02 Classical guitar lesson 08

Post by Salvatore Lovinello » Tue Apr 11, 2017 3:15 pm

Just what are you not agreeing with, Jonathan? I've checked with experts. The Purcell is wrong where noted, unless you wish to re-define music theory. The baseline has two beats to many. The Krieger while not wrong is written awkwardly where noted. The ornaments are passing tones and formulaic as this web site illustrates. http://openmusictheory.com/embellishingTones.html . You can disagree all you want, but music theory and convention says otherwise. Maybe I'm not seeing this correctly and you can enlighten me?

Has the final exam piece been posted yet?

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Re: D02 Classical guitar lesson 08

Post by Jonathan Lamb » Tue Apr 18, 2017 10:18 am

Fools rush in.....
:oops:
Topic: Musical Ornament
First, your reference to the Open Music Theory site:- It's confusing to talk about embellishing tones at this stage in our musical journey. Having read the page you linked my understanding is that these tones refer to harmonic progression. Moreover these examples of embellishing tones look to be drawn from an exclusively 20th century repertiore. For more about harmony in music please see Leonard Bernstein's highly entertaining Harvard lectures, here:-
:guitare:
(A) Synopsis https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Unans ... re_series)
(B) Youtube excepts https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Gt2zubHcER4
:chitarrista:
However, please take note of my point that this has very little to do with musical ornaments in early music itself (in Henry Purcell for example) thru the canon to include Baroque, classical, and romantic music. Note also, the 'special' status of the classical guitar and its proponents in the past few hundred years, e.g. Williams, Segovia, Pujol, Tarrega, Sor. As an instrument primarily played to accompany the voice and/or as a solo instrument, the classical guitar has a rich heritage of songs from the indigenous traditions of its geographical range; these songs are sometimes very ancient melodies passed down from generation to generation, before any attempt to codify or arrange formally, had been made. (see The Music of Spain by Gilbert Chase)This latter point, in part, offers perhaps an approach to ornament.
Here is a link about early music in general, including notes on performance and interpretation.
(C) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Early_music
The little twiddly bits here and there, in the Maestro's renditions, offer valuable insight and point us in the good direction for musical advancement.
They have been formalised over the years, and constitute a major part of formal musical education.
As a matter of principle, if you download almost any 'free' music score from the Delcamp archive of classical and copyright-free music, you may observe that the first couple of pages consist of a glossary of ornament. I have checked this out and it is, I believe, correct.
:arrow:
Next subject: Is the musical notation in the Purcell and the Krieger, wrong? No. In the Krieger the issue is accentuation, the rhythm and the beat. In the Purcell the issue is about harmony, and the special / difficult nature of classical guitar.
Topic: The Beat...
Topic: Musical Voices... Jenny your turn :casque:

Salvatore Lovinello
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Re: D02 Classical guitar lesson 08

Post by Salvatore Lovinello » Tue Apr 18, 2017 1:39 pm

So how does one justify the 5 beats in a measure that is supposed to have 3 in the Purcell base line (the note with the downward staff)? It's wrong, wrong, wrong! With the thousands of pages of music there are bound to be errors.

I didn't say the Krieger was wrong I said it was awkwardly written... and it is. I'm sure it has been brought up in the past. I'm shocked it hasn't been fixed. Until the Maestro himself or one of the moderators pipes in on why the passages I pointed out are correct I will consider them wrong.

Just because I am in the early stages of learning classical guitar doesn't mean I am going to let music theory conventions fly out the window. I'm not going to pretend I know what Maestro Delcamp means when he has said nothing on the subject.

I'm going to pull the wife card here. My wife sings for the Lyric Opera of Chicago, 23 years. Before that she sang with the Chicago Symphony Orchestra under Sir Georg Solti. She has an MFA in vocal performance from the University of Wisconsin. She also teaches privately. She and her colleagues side with me. You're just going to have to accept that the Maestro is human, his assistants are human, and sometimes humans make mistakes.

Perhaps these kinds of errors are meant to foment this kind of discussion.

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