D01 Classical guitar lesson 04

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PDF, MP3, Vidéos, Lessons : Level D01 - Level D02 - Level D03 - Level D04 - Level D05 - Level D06 - Level D07 - Level D08 - Level D09 - Level D10 - Level D11 - Level D12.
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Jean-François Delcamp
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D01 Classical guitar lesson 04

Post by Jean-François Delcamp » Tue Dec 05, 2017 9:18 pm

Hello everyone,
Please start by downloading the latest version of volume D01.
If you are new to the course, please read this message to familiarize yourself with the conditions for participating in the lessons. You should also read the first message in lesson 1, where you will find advice on how to make the most of your study time and on the methods of practising that I recommend.



First we will study some technical exercises from volume D01.
Page 54: G major scale and C major scale, numbers 4 and 5. Be sure to damp the notes properly in the descending passages. To damp the notes in the descending passages: lean the fingers of the left hand against the vibrating strings.

Youtube


Youtube




Finally, we'll look at six simple tunes, pages 21 to 25
Anonyme : La cucaracha
Anonyme : C'est la cloche du vieux manoir
Anonyme : Le coucou
Anonyme : Alouette, gentille alouette
Anonyme : Vent frais, vent du matin
Anonyme : Lundi matin
Anonyme : Cadet Rousselle

Youtube


Youtube


Youtube


Youtube


Youtube


Youtube


Youtube




I ask you first to work on all these exercises and tunes for a week and then to upload your recordings of:
Anonyme : La cucaracha
Anonyme : Alouette, gentille alouette
Anonyme : Lundi matin
Anonyme : Cadet Rousselle


Good luck!


I thank Geoff (GeoffB) who has helped in the translation of my lessons into English.


Jean-François

---

Exam qualifying submissions:

La cucaracha
Alouette, gentille alouette
Lundi matin
Cadet Rousselle
:( + ♫ = :)

Juan M Silva
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Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 04

Post by Juan M Silva » Wed Dec 06, 2017 3:02 am

Early Lesson! I love it.
Hello all. I have a question on theory as I start looking at these pieces, since we are now seeing sharps. In "La Cucaracha", the time signature displays a sharp symbol at the "F" line. In looking at the piece, there is not a single F note along that line. There are, however, notes at the "F" space:
La Cucaracha.JPG
So, what's the deal? Why is the sharp symbol in the line and not in the space at the time signature?
Along the same topic: Ce'st la Cloche,Le Coucou, Alouette all have sharps at the F line at the signature, but no F notes (space or line).
Looks like I wasn't paying attention during lesson 2-London's Burning. Sharp symbol at the F line there too, but no F notes.


Thank you!
-Juan
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ElRay
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Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 04

Post by ElRay » Wed Dec 06, 2017 4:01 am

The piece is in the Key of G Major. In order to keep the regular sequence of whole and half steps of a major scale, all the F's need to be sharp.

The you can look at the key signature like a giant set of ()'s around the piece. So, just as an accidental affects every note with the same name in the measure, the sharp/flat in the key signature affects every note with the same name in the piece.

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Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 04

Post by Juan M Silva » Wed Dec 06, 2017 2:54 pm

ElRay wrote:
Wed Dec 06, 2017 4:01 am
The piece is in the Key of G Major. In order to keep the regular sequence of whole and half steps of a major scale, all the F's need to be sharp.

The you can look at the key signature like a giant set of ()'s around the piece. So, just as an accidental affects every note with the same name in the measure, the sharp/flat in the key signature affects every note with the same name in the piece.
Thank you Elray. So, the incidental in this case applies to all F notes, regardless if the notes fall in a line or a space in the staff?
Also, is it just common convention to indicate the incidental starting from the top of the staff? I'm guessing one would not see an incidental for an F indicated in the space at the bottom of the staff?
Thanks again.
Juan
1976 Yamaha G-55-1

Craig McCallum
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Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 04

Post by Craig McCallum » Wed Dec 06, 2017 2:55 pm

Juan M Silva wrote:
Wed Dec 06, 2017 3:02 am
So, what's the deal? Why is the sharp symbol in the line and not in the space at the time signature?
As far as I can find out, there's no real reason for the F# being marked on the top line rather than in the bottom space... that's just where they go. But yes, it affects any F in the piece, no matter where on the stave that F lies.

Just for reference, here's the full list of Key Signatures and how they are notated - notice that the order the sharps are written is always the same, and always at the same spots on the stave.

http://openmusictheory.com/keySignatures.html

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Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 04

Post by Juan M Silva » Wed Dec 06, 2017 2:57 pm

Craig McCallum wrote:
Wed Dec 06, 2017 2:55 pm
Juan M Silva wrote:
Wed Dec 06, 2017 3:02 am
So, what's the deal? Why is the sharp symbol in the line and not in the space at the time signature?
As far as I can find out, there's no real reason for the F# being marked on the top line rather than in the bottom space... that's just where they go. But yes, it affects any F in the piece, no matter where on the stave that F lies.

Just for reference, here's the full list of Key Signatures and how they are notated - notice that the order the sharps are written is always the same, and always at the same spots on the stave.

http://openmusictheory.com/keySignatures.html
Awesome. Thank you Craig. This answers the follow up question I was just posting to ElRay.
Big thank you for the link. I'm reading it now, and it is very informative and easy to follow.
Juan
1976 Yamaha G-55-1

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Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 04

Post by soltirefa » Wed Dec 06, 2017 3:17 pm

I have always thought JFD could record his videos with the camera looking at a mirror. Then the student could tell more easily how it would look for a right-handed guitarist.

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Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 04

Post by Grayson Bray Morris » Fri Dec 08, 2017 12:12 pm

Juan M Silva wrote:
Wed Dec 06, 2017 2:57 pm
Craig McCallum wrote:
Wed Dec 06, 2017 2:55 pm
Just for reference, here's the full list of Key Signatures and how they are notated - notice that the order the sharps are written is always the same, and always at the same spots on the stave.

http://openmusictheory.com/keySignatures.html
Awesome. Thank you Craig. [...]
Big thank you for the link. I'm reading it now, and it is very informative and easy to follow.
Juan
I heartily second Juan. Very useful! Thank you, Craig.
Much madness is divinest sense, to a discerning eye; much sense, the starkest madness. --Emily Dickinson

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Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 04

Post by Juan M Silva » Fri Dec 08, 2017 5:33 pm

ElRay wrote:
Wed Dec 06, 2017 4:01 am
The piece is in the Key of G Major.
ELRay,
Hi. I am still trying to make heads or tails of this. I found some very useful information, but I wanted to ask you a couple of questions to cross check my understanding (if you don't mind).
1. How did you determine that the piece was in the key of G Major? Is it because only one sharp is annotated? I am looking at the circle that Greg sent me a link to, but I am also looking at page 9 of the link I am providing below. Hmm...as I am writing this it's getting clearer. The circle is a bit of a 'cheat-sheet' tool, right? The key is determined by the signature, not by the notes in the piece...which is why the following homework pieces don't have F notes at all, but the key would still be Gmajor because that's what the composer used to compose?
2. The scale (Is it a scale at all?) at the top right of the page starts with a D note, so are keys and scales two different things? If they are two different things, is it a D scale?

All, I found an old scan of the Carcassi Method online if you're interested. Pages 7-9 offers some very good information on this topic.
https://urresearch.rochester.edu/instit ... onNumber=1
:merci:
Juan
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Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 04

Post by ElRay » Sat Dec 09, 2017 3:35 am

Another source of info is: <http://https://www.musictheory.net/>. Their lesson on Major scales is at: <https://www.musictheory.net/lessons/21>

I think you've mostly got it. Some things make little sense until you can see the bigger picture, or you know the history how European music theory/notation evolved.

A major scale is a major scale by definition. Think: Do-Re-Mi-Fa-So-La-Ti-Do or: C-D-E-F-G-A-B-C. It is defined to be: W-W-H-W-W-W-H, where 'W' is a whole-step and 'H' is a half-step. C-Major has no sharps or flats because the intervals between the note names fit that whole-step/half-step pattern.

If you start on G and go: G-A-B-C-D-E-F-G, the whole/half step pattern isn't followed, because E->F is a half-step and F->G is a whole step, so, the F has to become an F# to keep the W-W-H-W-W-W-H pattern. If you start on 'D', you'll need to sharpen the F and the C to keep the W-W-H-W-W-W-H pattern. You can see this on page 31 and 34 of the Carcassi Method you linked to.

That's why "you know" that the piece is in "G-Major", because the key signature has just the F#. It's by definition. Keys and scales are related, so if a "piece is in G-Major" (Has a G-Major Key Signature), then any and every 'F' you see is really an F#, unless otherwise noted. Similarly, if the piece was in D-Major, then any plain F is really an F# and any plain C is really a C#.

It is true that a piece without any Fs or Cs would "fit" equally well in to C-Major, G-Major and D-Major keys; however, from an academic perspective, a particular key might be used to enforce a particular "position" on to the student. As a beginning guitarist, I would likely start a piece in D-Major in 2nd position, even if there were no Fs or Cs. That would mean that I'd likely grab the fretted G on the 4th string instead of playing the open G on the 3rd string.

Ray

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James A. Showalter
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Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 04

Post by James A. Showalter » Sat Dec 09, 2017 4:17 pm

I can add 2-cents to this discussion about key signature-

As already discussed any of the 12-notes can define a key signature. Outside of having complete mental recall of the "Circle of 5ths" there are 2 convenient ways of knowing which notes are sharp/flat for any key signature.

The 1st is to realize that a Major key signature must always follow the rule of order for Whole and Half steps: WWHWWWH

This is most easily observed by applying the rule to the C-key signature which is all natural: C_D_EF_G_A_BC
Here I've arranged the scale with underscores occupying the whole steps and the half-steps are just close together.

It is also convenient to derive the minor key signature from the Major. This is most obvious by applying a similar rule of order for minor key signatures and review the natural minor scale which has no sharps or flats.

The natural minor scale is A and it follows the rule of order, WHWWHWW: A_BC_D_EF_G_A

It is also convenient to realize that all major keys have a relative minor key (Am in this case is the relative minor of CM). This means that they share the same notes but in different order. The relative minor key is derived by realizing it is situated 1-1/2 steps in front of the Major key.

Consider the following organization of the 7 natural notes:

A_BC_D_EF_G_A_BC

Do you see the relative minor key arranged in phase with its major key?

C_D_EF_G_A_BC C-Major
A_BC_D_EF_G_A A-minor

W WHW W W H Major key Rule of Order
WHW WHW W minor key Rule of Order

Finally there is the 2nd convenient method of knowing key signature. I apologize for the digression into relative keys above but it is related. This 2nd method is an expression for knowing the "Circle of 5ths" and thereby knowing what notes in each key are sharp/flat. Here is the "rule":

"First Class Groups Don't Always Eat Best" ---> FCGDAEB and is applied by a position rule (-1 0 1 2 3 4 5) where C is in position 0.

C in position 0 means there are no sharps. The start of this discussion was about G which is in position 1. Position-1 means that G has 1-sharp, and it will be F (F is the 1st position of the rule. So let's define key signatures for all seven natural notes using this convenient method:

F is unique and you just have to remember its significance. It is in first position with value -1 which tells that it gets a flat instead of a sharp and the flat is B. F_G_ABb_C_D_EF
Check to make sure the derived scale matches the order rule for Major scales.

We already discussed C which is in the 2nd position of our "Circle of 5ths expression" and it has no sharps or flats, therefore its value is zero.

We already discussed G which is in 3rd position of our expression with position value of 1 so it has 1-sharp which is F (F is the "First" word of our expression). G_A_BC_D_E_F#G

D is in fourth position of our expression and has position value of 2. This means D will have 2 sharps and they will be the notes occupying the first two positions of our expression (i.e. F & C). D_E_F#G_A_B_C#D.
Check to make sure the derived scale matches the order rule for Major scales.

A is in fifth position of our expression and has position value of 3. This means A will have 3 sharps and they will be the notes occupying the first three positions of our expression (i.e. F & C & G). A_B_C#D_E_F#_G#A.
Check to make sure the derived scale matches the order rule for Major scales.

E is in sixth position of our expression and has position value of 4. This means E will have 4 sharps and they will be the notes occupying the first four positions of our expression (i.e. F & C & G & D). E_F#_G#A_B_C#_D#E.
Check to make sure the derived scale matches the order rule for Major scales.

Now B is in last position of our expression rule and has position value 5.
This means B will have 5 sharps and they will be the notes occupying the first five positions of our expression (i.e. F & C & G & D & A). B_C#_D#E_F#_G#_A#B.
Check to make sure the derived scale matches the order rule for Major scales.

Realize the position value always starts with G and the first sharp is always F.

On another note you can also derive a minor key from its corresponding Major key by flatting the 3rd, 6th & 7th note in the major scale. Do not get this confused with the relative minor discussion above.

That's at least 2-cents worth.
I hope it is meaningful for you.
James
Last edited by James A. Showalter on Sat Dec 09, 2017 8:59 pm, edited 3 times in total.
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Juan M Silva
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Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 04

Post by Juan M Silva » Sat Dec 09, 2017 7:44 pm

This is plenty of meaningful material to chew on. I offer you my sincere gratitude, Ray and James, for taking the time to write these wonderful explanations and sharing your experience with us.
Warm Regards,
Juan
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Grayson Bray Morris
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Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 04

Post by Grayson Bray Morris » Sun Dec 10, 2017 10:31 am

Seconding Juan again — thanks so much for this, Ray and James!
Much madness is divinest sense, to a discerning eye; much sense, the starkest madness. --Emily Dickinson

Juan M Silva
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Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 04

Post by Juan M Silva » Sun Dec 10, 2017 9:07 pm

Hello classmates,
Here are the assigned recordings. Like always, all comments are welcome. I am still struggling with staying tight on the counts/time. But previous comments regarding slowing down made a big difference.

La cucaracha

Youtube

Alouette, gentille alouette

Youtube

Lundi matin

Youtube

Cadet Rousselle

Youtube


Thanks all!
Off I go to catch a performance of The Nutcracker with my family.
:casque:
-Juan
1976 Yamaha G-55-1

ElRay
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Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 04

Post by ElRay » Mon Dec 11, 2017 3:26 am

James A. Showalter wrote:
Sat Dec 09, 2017 4:17 pm
... C-key signature which is all natural: C_D_EF_G_A_BC
Here I've arranged the scale with underscores occupying the whole steps and the half-steps are just close together. ...
I like this way of typing/showing it!

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