D04 Classical guitar lesson 03

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Jean-François Delcamp
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D04 Classical guitar lesson 03

Post by Jean-François Delcamp » Wed Nov 05, 2014 7:19 am

Hello everyone,
Please start by downloading the latest version of volume D04.
If you are new to the course, please read this message to familiarize yourself with the conditions for participating in the lessons. You should also read the first message in lesson 1, where you will find advice on how to make the most of your study time and on the methods of practising that I recommend.




Today, we're going to work on a series of exercises.
- page 112, numbers 11, 12, 13 - Jean-François DELCAMP (1956) GAMMES - SCALE - SCALES – ESCALAS
When changes of position are needed, you will be using the "position shift" technique. Position I is the left hand position where the index finger (1) is placed behind the 1st fret, position V is the hand position where the index (1) is placed behind the fifth fret, etc. The position shift involves moving the left hand along the neck, from position to position, from fret to fret. In the scales we're looking at today, notice that my first finger never leaves the first string, I use it as a guide for my hand. Position shifts are shown by oblique lines linking two fingering indications given for the same finger.
The following video corresponds to bars 5 to 9 of the scale of F major, number 11 on page 112. In this video example, I am playing slowly to make it easier for you to see my first finger sliding from position I to position V, then from position V to position X. In the descending scale, notice that I do the same thing in reverse. When I return from position X to position V, my first finger slides from one position to the other without ever leaving the string.

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The following videos are for numbers 11, 12 ands 13 on page 112. Concentrate your practice on the passages highlighted in yellow, and do your best to perfect the position shift technique.

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- Page 120, numbers 31, 32 and 33. Jean-François DELCAMP (1956) LIAISONS - LEGATURE - SLURS – LIGADOS
We have already worked on the rest stroke (apoyando) with the fingers of the right hand. Now we are going to work on doing a rest stroke with the fingers of the left hand. That is the best way to learn how to execute descending slurs. In number 32, bar 2, the fingers of the left hand execute the slurs with the help of the rest stroke. The fingers 4, 3, 2 and then 1 pluck the second string then finish their move by coming up against the first string. Place the left hand fingers vertically in relation to the fingerboard, that's the right position to play slurs.

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- page 128 - Improvisation
Improvisation work - D02
These exercises in improvisation are to be done several times a week, for several months.
Vary the volume (mf, pp, ff, p ...), timbres and rhythms. Never play the same thing twice, because it would cease to be improvisation, and would become composition.
8/ improvise a melody upon the bass-line of DANSE D'AVILA, using only these 7 notes (G# A B C# D E F#).
9/ improvise a melody upon the bass-line of OH! SUSANNA, using only these 7 notes (G# A B C# D E F#).

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Finally we'll look at 4 pieces, pages 16, 49, 74, 75 and 103.

- pages 16, 17 Borrono da Milano, Pietro Paulo - Peschatore che va cantando
Here, as for "The sick tune" which we saw in the previous lesson, the even-numbered phrases are divisions (French: diminution; Italian: passaggio; Spanish: glosa) on the odd-numbered phrases. In this piece each bar (measure) contains a total of 3 half notes (minims). At the end of each of the phrases the rhythm changes to the length of a whole note (semibreve) and thus we have 3 whole notes in the space of 2 bars. This change of rhythm is known as a hemiola. In my PDFs I indicate the presence of hemiolas by dotted lines above the bars.
When you play the first beat in bar 3, make sure you simultaneously damp the open F# string which is still sounding from the previous bar, as I show you in the following short video.

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- page 49 Carulli, Ferdinando - Prelude opus 114 n°7
The double oblique stroke indicates that you should repeat the preceding group of notes.
See the example here: http://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Abr%C3%A9v ... une_mesure [The French explanation reads "Repetition of fragments shorter than a whole bar. When a fragment, pattern or motif needs to be repeated, each repetition can be replaced by a double oblique stroke."]
From a technical point of view, to perfect your fretting technique, I recommend that you practise this arpeggio while keeping 3 fingers on the strings throughout. This way of practising will teach you to execute the necessary fretting movement without producing involuntary movement of the other fingers.
Here is a video extract showing this finger practice, where you can see the fingers playing the strings with the greatest possible economy of movement.
At the bottom of the page, Carulli provides you with another two patterns (B and C) to use in your practice of this prelude.

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- pages 74, 75 Paganini, Niccolò - Ghiribizzo n°17 Le Streghe
Each section of 16 bars has a particular character. The first section is lively and rhythmical, and is best brought out by playing it with a certain crispness. To give the ends of the phrases more character, I speed up the tempo a little and avoid letting the arpeggios ring on in bars 7, 15, 23, 31 and 47. The second section, less tight than the first, begins with a harmonic progression (F# - B - E - A) in arpeggios for which a legato style of playing is suited. The third section contrasts strongly with the 2 previous sections; the key changes to minor, the rhythm to duple time, and finally the tessitura (general pitch) moves up from the mid-range to the treble.
The accomplished classicism of this brief composition is the hallmark of the great master that Paganini was.

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- page 103 Morin, Ludovic-Alexandre - Petite étude
The phrases of this Petite étude (little study) in E minor are made up of 9 bars, which is rare. Ludovic-Alexandre Morin has posted his recording of his composition on the French forum. If you are registered on that forum, you can listen to his MP3 here: http://www.guitareclassiquedelcamp.com/ ... 65&t=10321
In bar 18 I advise you to play the harmonics by using a half barré with the little finger (finger 4), placed 2 millimetres in front of the fourth fret, as I show you in the following short video.

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I ask you first to work on all these exercises and pieces for one week and then to post your recordings on the forum for:
- page 49 Carulli, Ferdinando - Prelude opus 114 n°7
- pages 74, 75 Paganini, Niccolò - Ghiribizzo n°17 Le Streghe
- page 103 Morin, Ludovic-Alexandre - Petite étude


Good luck!

I thank Geoff (GeoffB) who has helped in the translation of my lessons into English.

Jean-François

---

Exam qualifying submissions:

Prelude opus 114 n°7
Le Streghe
Petite étude

Catherine Livingston
Le Streghe
Petite étude
Prelude opus 114 n°7

Mark Bacon
Le Streghe
Petite étude
Prelude opus 114 n°7

John Montes
Prelude opus 114 n°7
Le Streghe
Petite étude

George Karpenkov
Prelude opus 114 n°7
Petite étude
Le Streghe

Marko Räsänen
Prelude opus 114 n°7
Le Streghe
Petite étude

Eric de Vries
Prelude opus 114 n°7
Le Streghe
Petite étude

Satyajit Kadle
Prelude opus 114 n°7
Le Streghe
Petite étude
:( + ♫ = :)

Catherine Livingston

Re: D04 Classical guitar lesson 03

Post by Catherine Livingston » Tue Nov 11, 2014 6:42 pm

Hello!,
How are you doing with this month's pieces? I decided to post Morin's Petite Etude early. I have only been working on it for less than a week but need some feedback r.e. how to produce a better harmonic at the 4th fret. I am finding this to be challenging :chaud: . It is my favorite of the lesson 4 pieces though. I am making progress on the Carulli Prelude and am hoping to post a video within the next week. The Paganini Ghiribizzo is still challenging for me. I am able to differentiate between the legato and staccato parts for most of the piece but this will take considerable practice to me to play at a level that sounds decent. I am very confused about which notes to play staccato in the minor section. Measures 39 and 40 and 46-48 are the areas of trouble. It isn't indicated in the music, so I am wondering it it's important to be specific r.e. exactly which notes to play staccato. Professor Delcamp seems to be a bit playful with this one. Do you have any thoughts on this?
Anyhow, here is my Petite Etude.
Happy Practicing!
-Cat
Ludovic-Alexadre Morin, Petit Etude, 2006-

Youtube

WilliamTee
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Re: D04 Classical guitar lesson 03

Post by WilliamTee » Wed Nov 12, 2014 9:04 am

Hi Cat,

You've made good progress on Petite Etude in just few days. Just one thing I think you made mistake on bar 8 on both occasions.
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Mark Bacon
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Re: D04 Classical guitar lesson 03

Post by Mark Bacon » Thu Nov 13, 2014 5:39 pm

Cat,

Since this piece is made up almost entirely of arpeggios the notes should ring out more. This isn't usually indicated in the score (I'm not sure why, for simplicity, perhaps?) but is a convention of sorts. Refer to Mr DelCamps performance for reference. Harmonics on the fourth fret are much more tricky than those on 5, 7, and 12. Two things I think will help is to really pluck the strings hard and then lift your LH fingers off as soon as you do. Watch Mr DelCamp, he does the same-lifts that pinky as soon as he can. Otherwise the LH fingers immediately go from sounding the harmonic chime to damping it out, especially at fret four where they are so weak. I remember from electric guitar that there are even weaker and higher pitched ones in between frets 3 and 4.

With the Paganini piece-you're correct in that its a very light-hearted and humorous piece with a nice little bounce. That said, I think your ear should be your guide in the minor section. To me though the piece takes quite the somber turn and I don't staccato many notes at all in that section. Overall I think this month's pieces are easier than the last few (well, the paganini arpeggios are tricky, and I don't speed them up nearly as much as Mr DelCamp does). The non-required piece baffles me though. It's difficult timing/hemiola are deviously hard to play right. I'm glad it's optional-I'd be embarrassed to upload a video of my hacking away at it. :oops: I'll get my vids posted tomorrow or over the weekend.

Mark

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Goran Penic
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Re: D04 Classical guitar lesson 03

Post by Goran Penic » Fri Nov 14, 2014 12:16 am

Catherine Livingston wrote:Hello!,
... how to produce a better harmonic at the 4th fret....
Move your right hand closer to bridge and there find a place where the sound will be good. And as Mark said:
Mark Bacon wrote: Two things I think will help is to really pluck the strings hard and then lift your LH fingers off as soon as you do.
:bye:
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Catherine Livingston

Re: D04 Classical guitar lesson 03

Post by Catherine Livingston » Fri Nov 14, 2014 3:24 am

Thanks William, Mark and Goran! I have been applying the techniques you mentioned and the harmonic is sounding better! I think I found
my mistake in bar 8 too. Happy practicing.
-Cat

Mark Bacon
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Re: D04 Classical guitar lesson 03

Post by Mark Bacon » Sat Nov 15, 2014 7:16 pm

OK, OK. I need a little more time with the Paganini piece. Sigh.


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John Montes
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Re: D04 Classical guitar lesson 03

Post by John Montes » Mon Nov 17, 2014 3:54 pm

Hi Mark,

The Carulli piece sounds very fluid and with energy, nice touch.

The Morin is almost as fluid as the Carulli, the facial expression at 1:24 with the harmonic is priceless :-)
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Catherine Livingston

Re: D04 Classical guitar lesson 03

Post by Catherine Livingston » Tue Nov 18, 2014 1:24 am

Mark,
:bravo:
I agree with John. The Carulli piece sounds gorgeous. You play it with good expression. The Petite Etude is played with excellent expression and tone. I am impressed by the resounding harmonic the first time around. I can tell by the expression on your face that you weren't as pleased with the 2nd harmonic but I'm glad you continued to play the piece because it was a pleasure to listen to. :casque:
-Cat

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Re: D04 Classical guitar lesson 03

Post by John Montes » Tue Nov 18, 2014 4:42 am

Here's the Carulli Prelude with a Vicente Carrillo guitar


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John Montes
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Re: D04 Classical guitar lesson 03

Post by John Montes » Wed Nov 19, 2014 3:12 am

Morin's Petite Etude, I really like this miniature composition by this modern composer of our time.


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George Karpenkov

Re: D04 Classical guitar lesson 03

Post by George Karpenkov » Wed Nov 19, 2014 12:14 pm

John, very nice Petite Etude rendition! Was a real pleasure to listen to!
I would modulate the rhythm a bit less though to get a more steady feel, but I guess it's a matter of taste.

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John Montes
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Re: D04 Classical guitar lesson 03

Post by John Montes » Wed Nov 19, 2014 4:56 pm

Thanks for listening George and the feedback.

There's definitely a few minor mistakes in there and some sight-reading/executing in real-time un-steadiness that comes with learning a new piece :-)

It should be in public performance ready form in about 1-2 weeks after more practice
May post a replacement video by that time
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Catherine Livingston

Re: D04 Classical guitar lesson 03

Post by Catherine Livingston » Thu Nov 20, 2014 12:57 am

John,
Your recordings of Carulli's Prelude and Morin's Petite Etude are very nice. :casque:
The Prelude is technically good. The Petite Etude is clearly played with good tone and
expression. I think if you follow George's suggestion to play it more evenly while keeping
a few of the slight pauses, it will sound masterful. Watch for the slur in measure 15. I missed that
at first as well. You have been catching up really quickly!
:) Cat

Mark Bacon
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Re: D04 Classical guitar lesson 03

Post by Mark Bacon » Thu Nov 20, 2014 2:28 am

John,

Both pieces are really coming along. I can't really add much regarding the Etude above Cat's sentiments. Your taste for the Morin piece shows in the performance.

A minor detail for the Carulli-try for just a bit more volume balance with the arpeggios. When playing a repeated RH pattern like this with the high E being played with the 'a' finger the high note often comes out louder. When the high note doesn't change (and especially when it's the open string) the effect becomes even more noticeable, as in this prelude. I find that I have to compensate my stroke to avoid having the same since my 'a' nail is quite a bit longer than the rest.

Pretty minor detail though, and only something a fellow CGer would likely notice...not so much a non-player.

Mark

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