How luthiers string their guitars...

Choice of classical guitar strings and technical issues connected with their use.
Keith
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Re: How luthiers string their guitars...

Post by Keith » Thu Aug 17, 2017 10:43 pm

I would add that La Bella 2001 Medium tension should also be considered a string of choice for a non-colored sound yet one which allows wood to speak in its true voice. I have found 2001 strings coax out that voice better than D'Addario.
be true to the one you love but have many flings with different guitars

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Philipp Lerche
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Re: How luthiers string their guitars...

Post by Philipp Lerche » Thu Aug 17, 2017 10:56 pm

+1 for Keith ;)
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Jeffrey Armbruster
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Re: How luthiers string their guitars...

Post by Jeffrey Armbruster » Fri Aug 18, 2017 12:16 am

the argument by some seems to be...some brands of strings reveal the true voice of the wood (the guitar); other strings cover that true voice with their own sound. So far, their are two nominations for the brand of strings that reveal the true voice of a guitar--D'addario and La Bella. My guess is, others would nominate yet more brands. And still others would find that D'addario's, etc. actually stifle the true voice of their guitar. In the end, the voice of truth is strangled in a spaghetti of strings. (o.k. that last bit doesn't quite work.)

I'm with Peter: there is no one brand of strings that are 'the exception' in that they alone reveal what a guitar actually sounds like, while all the others speak the sound of the strings while in some way altering the 'true voice' of the guitar.

'Revealing the true voice of a guitar' would be what is meant by 'neutral sound'. Frankly, I think this is a mis-apprehension. But I will stipulate that I have somewhat limited experience in string brands (four or five).
Last edited by Jeffrey Armbruster on Fri Aug 18, 2017 1:42 am, edited 1 time in total.
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robin loops
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Re: How luthiers string their guitars...

Post by robin loops » Fri Aug 18, 2017 1:22 am

I think it goes beyond 'what is best for the guitar' and includes personal preferences, playing style, etc. Strings that might play perfect and sound awesome on a particular guitar when played by one player may not be the best strings when that guitar is played by another. One example of this is tension. A luthier with a light touch might prefer a low tension set of brand X but when played by a player that has a very hard touch and maybe does a lot of rasgueado technique, they might buzz. It gets even more complicated when you consider that different strings might be better suited to baroque music on that guitar but others might serve romantic music better.

Personally I never notice much difference, if at all, between one brand to another in recordings so I go with playing comfort and convenience (availability and price) when choosing strings, which makes ej45's my string of choice more often than not.
One Ring to rule them all, One Ring to find them, One Ring to bring them all, and in the darkness bind them.
-James-

Rognvald
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Re: How luthiers string their guitars...

Post by Rognvald » Fri Aug 18, 2017 2:10 am

"I think it goes beyond 'what is best for the guitar' and includes personal preferences, playing style, etc. Strings that might play perfect and sound awesome on a particular guitar when played by one player may not be the best strings when that guitar is played by another. " Robin Loops


I like this sentiment, Robin. There are so many factors in a CG's sound that it is nearly impossible to say that strings A or B will give you what you want. Coming from a Jazz/R and B background on the saxophone/flute, I am always amazed at how little attention many CG's devote to THEIR SOUND. Among sax players, it was the first thing you sought after you achieved technical ability and it was something you worked on your entire life. Even today, you could play a recording for me by Coltrane, Ammons, Rollins, Parker, Person, Getz, Hawkins, Dexter, etc and I can tell you in three bars who's playing. But, if you don't have a sound, how have YOU spoken through the music? With CG's, some have fat hands, thin hands, big sound, small sound, aggressive attacks, feeble attacks and then the INTIMATE knowledge of YOUR INSTRUMENT-- what it can and cannot do. I have two concert guitars from respected luthiers: R. Brune and A. LoPrinzi and a good "working" guitar by Esteve. All three have different sound potentials based on my playing style and by playing these guitars in a regular rotation, it has enabled me to understand better the sound that defines me as a player. When you hear Roland Dyens, Yamandu Costa, Segovia, Marcin Dylla, Eduardo Fernandez, Ricardo Gallen, Wes Montgomery and Fabio Zanon, for example you know you are listening to a personal voice. Music is a long road to discovery. First, you must discover yourself . . .and then you will find your voice. Strings are just a small part of your journey. Playing again . . . Rognvald
"And those who were seen dancing were thought to be insane by those who could not hear the music." Friedrich Nietzsche, Thus Spake Zarathustra

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Waddy Thomson
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Re: How luthiers string their guitars...

Post by Waddy Thomson » Fri Aug 18, 2017 3:06 am

It's all about what you like. Some strings highlight the overtones in a guitar, some damp them somewhat. I put Oasis GPX Carbons on my guitars because I love the way they highlight the overtones. There is a sparkle that is hard to find with other strings. I have substituted nylon for the first string from time to time, and that works too. However some players just do not like carbon strings.
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Laudiesdad69
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Re: How luthiers string their guitars...

Post by Laudiesdad69 » Fri Aug 18, 2017 5:53 am

ben etow wrote:
Thu Aug 17, 2017 12:14 pm
Laudiesdad69 wrote:
Sun Aug 13, 2017 10:35 pm
In my experience, I agree with what others have said previously about EJ45 and EJ46 being neutral sounding strings. I'll say "neutral" as they are clear sounding and colorless. They have been this way on several guitars I have owned.
I would never say the EJ45/46 trebles sound clear... Maybe among the nylons, but I am not even sure of that.
Yeah, the nylons.

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robin loops
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Re: How luthiers string their guitars...

Post by robin loops » Fri Aug 18, 2017 4:27 pm

I tend to think of changing the brand of strings like making adjustments to the tone controls on an amp, with ej45 being 'all controls set to 12 O'Clock. If you've ever played electric guitar you know that this is the starting point and then you make minor adjustments from there. Personally I like to start with ej45's on any guitar. Then if I find it lacking in the top end I'll try a brighter string or if it's too bright I'll try a darker string, etc.
One Ring to rule them all, One Ring to find them, One Ring to bring them all, and in the darkness bind them.
-James-

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