Tips for restringing classical guitar

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lagartija
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Re: Tips for restringing classical guitar

Post by lagartija » Sun Sep 03, 2017 1:10 pm

Stephen Kenyon wrote:
Sun Sep 03, 2017 8:54 am
Peskyendeavour wrote:
Sat Sep 02, 2017 11:52 pm
...
And I thought the less squeaky the better - and that they just got broken in! Oops...... :oops:
Well it also depends on the precise make of string, some are incredibly squeaky when new and few players can control the excess noise, so its best to use them after a few hours play, but the point is after a while one is losing a whole load of tone after the squeaks are long gone. Its such a gradual process for most people, the exact point of that loss is impossible to pinpoint.
Darn!! And here I thought the lack of squeaks was an improvement in my technique. :-P
(Just kidding... ;-) )
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Classical Guitar forever!

Peskyendeavour
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Re: Tips for restringing classical guitar

Post by Peskyendeavour » Sun Sep 03, 2017 9:57 pm

Stephen Kenyon wrote:
Sun Sep 03, 2017 8:54 am
Peskyendeavour wrote:
Sat Sep 02, 2017 11:52 pm
...
And I thought the less squeaky the better - and that they just got broken in! Oops...... :oops:
Well it also depends on the precise make of string, some are incredibly squeaky when new and few players can control the excess noise, so its best to use them after a few hours play, but the point is after a while one is losing a whole load of tone after the squeaks are long gone. Its such a gradual process for most people, the exact point of that loss is impossible to pinpoint.
Yeah now you mention I realise about the wear under the string at second fret... and I had been puzzled for two weeks about tonal quality of my playing of Carcassi étude in A - the bar where barring of IX then using the D string for C# D was not producing the right sound and much less clear than the newer strings 1 2 3... and I thought it was my playing... until you said so

I tried playing the same piece on my other guitar which had a set of strings put on the same time and it sounded even and fine... so it wasn't me after all... I was blaming my own technique all this time...

I thought it was because the gut strings I was trying wears out quicker so no need for changing the bass... but actually the time is also ripe!

Thanks for this advice, much appreciated.

:merci: :oops: :roll: :lol:

Peskyendeavour
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Re: Tips for restringing classical guitar

Post by Peskyendeavour » Sun Sep 03, 2017 9:59 pm

lagartija wrote:
Sun Sep 03, 2017 1:10 pm
Stephen Kenyon wrote:
Sun Sep 03, 2017 8:54 am
Peskyendeavour wrote:
Sat Sep 02, 2017 11:52 pm
...
And I thought the less squeaky the better - and that they just got broken in! Oops...... :oops:
Well it also depends on the precise make of string, some are incredibly squeaky when new and few players can control the excess noise, so its best to use them after a few hours play, but the point is after a while one is losing a whole load of tone after the squeaks are long gone. Its such a gradual process for most people, the exact point of that loss is impossible to pinpoint.
Darn!! And here I thought the lack of squeaks was an improvement in my technique. :-P
(Just kidding... ;-) )
:casque: :lol: :lol: :lol:

Peskyendeavour
Posts: 119
Joined: Wed May 17, 2017 11:15 pm

Re: Tips for restringing classical guitar

Post by Peskyendeavour » Sat Sep 30, 2017 9:15 am

Stephen Kenyon wrote:
Sun Sep 03, 2017 8:54 am
Peskyendeavour wrote:
Sat Sep 02, 2017 11:52 pm
...
And I thought the less squeaky the better - and that they just got broken in! Oops...... :oops:
Well it also depends on the precise make of string, some are incredibly squeaky when new and few players can control the excess noise, so its best to use them after a few hours play, but the point is after a while one is losing a whole load of tone after the squeaks are long gone. Its such a gradual process for most people, the exact point of that loss is impossible to pinpoint.
Thank you Stephen for teaching me what to look out for - I've changed strings to a new set and Carcassi étude sounds beautiful ! (Apart from my own stupid mistakes that is! ... the tone quality is much improved)

Thank you

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Stephen Kenyon
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Re: Tips for restringing classical guitar

Post by Stephen Kenyon » Sat Sep 30, 2017 11:00 am

Peskyendeavour wrote:
Sat Sep 30, 2017 9:15 am
... - I've changed strings to a new set and Carcassi étude sounds beautiful !
Performer is, and composer would be, happy - result 8)
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Rick Beauregard
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Re: Tips for restringing classical guitar

Post by Rick Beauregard » Sat Sep 30, 2017 2:50 pm

I saw a video on 12 hole tie blocks but can't find it now. Anyone see this? It had a knot method for the first string to prevent slipping.
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kvormwald
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Re: Tips for restringing classical guitar

Post by kvormwald » Tue Oct 10, 2017 11:47 pm

Hi Uros,

Thank you for your very informative video. I'm now anxious to try your method at the tuning peg end for attaching the string. I had always used a simple knot there. So hopefully I will remember to try the new method. It looks very promising because, even though I do not play concerts, I many times struggle to undo the knot.

Thanks again,

Ken
"Things should be made as simple as possible, but no simpler." ~ Albert Einstein

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