Why Isn't This Piece More Popular?

Discussions relating to the classical guitar which don't fit elsewhere.
Altophile
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Why Isn't This Piece More Popular?

Post by Altophile » Mon Dec 18, 2017 12:52 am

A Ma Mai, by Obregon:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xRCGhS1gPu4

I can't imagine why this piece has never been recorded by a Parkining, Williams, etc.

Addendum:

Here's a cleaner performance:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fBwRETsroCQ

simonm
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Re: Why Isn't This Piece More Popular?

Post by simonm » Mon Dec 18, 2017 11:24 am

Thank you.

A search reveals little about the composer except that he was a Tarrega pupil and only two pieces seem the be easily available - this and a gavotte. (Amanda)

I could load the first link - you tube is blocking it here. I found another version which although poor from a sound quality perspective, it is much more musical than the "cleaner performance" and includes the harmonics at the beginning. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kQPMbQv3t0A Once she gets going it has a nice bit of swing to it.

Altophile
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Re: Why Isn't This Piece More Popular?

Post by Altophile » Mon Dec 18, 2017 11:44 am

simonm wrote:
Mon Dec 18, 2017 11:24 am
Thank you.

A search reveals little about the composer except that he was a Tarrega pupil and only two pieces seem the be easily available - this and a gavotte. (Amanda)

I could load the first link - you tube is blocking it here. I found another version which although poor from a sound quality perspective, it is much more musical than the "cleaner performance" and includes the harmonics at the beginning. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kQPMbQv3t0A Once she gets going it has a nice bit of swing to it.
Yeah, Frederick Noad includes the piece in his Romantic Guitar Anthology, and the accompanying CD includes a very nice performance of it, much better than any on YouTube. In Noad's biographical notes he also says that Obregon was a student of Tarrega, and that Tarrega was reluctant at first, but:

"...was evidently persuaded [to be his teacher] after Obregon played one of his own compositions." (The Romantic Guitar), p. 43

According to Noad, "A Medly of Airs as played by Senor Obregon before Their Majesties was published in London, full of colorful effects with the guitar tuned to an E major chord." (ibid)

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