Fernando Sor, Opus 35 - shall we learn it together?

Discussions relating to the classical guitar which don't fit elsewhere.
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Jorge Oliveira
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Re: Fernando Sor, Opus 35 - shall we learn it together?

Post by Jorge Oliveira » Fri May 24, 2019 11:06 am

Thank you mmcnabb, Yisrael and Mike for your comments on my rendition of the #9. To tell you the truth, I also suspected that I was staying too long in the first bass note of the arpeggios and even considered to say something about that in my own comments in the post. I wish I had... :( In resume, I agree with all three of you in this respect - and also with you, Yisrael, on not maintaining the rhythm in those long phrases (I still do not have an in-built metronome in my mind :D). I'll post, then, a version 2 soon, but, this time I may rely on a metronome :( and I may have to decrease the tempo a little bit.

Now, on Mike's second version of the #8:
MikeJay wrote:
Fri May 24, 2019 9:41 am
...
After Yisrael's comments on my 35#8, I went to work on it again...
You slowed it a little bit and I like it better this way :D. It is a beautiful piece, it reminds me one of those gracious eighteenth century palace dances we see in films, with long lines of gentleman and ladies in front of each other, all pairs dancing similarly to each other and changing pairs occasionally :). It is difficult to execute in a clean way and if you speed it up it, well, it stops being a "gracious dance" and mistakes and missing notes are bound to happen.

With this new entry of yours, the Table of Posted Records becomes as follows:

Sor's Opus 35 recorded pieces as of 24May19.png

The corresponding Excel file (TPR) is stored in my Google Drive and any Forum Member can download and use it at any time. By pointing to any particular post, the reader will have available not only the sound or video file but also all the subsequent comments made by other Forum members. Mind you, the link to posts provided in this Excel file does not work in the iPhone and in the iPad (being lodged in the Google Drive, Google interferes with the Microsoft Excel file trying to convert it to an equivalent Google spreadsheet... too bad, unfortunately :cry:).
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.
1972 - Kuniharu Nobe #8, 658/52, Spr, IN RW, Tokyo, JP
1976 - Ryoji Matsuoka No.50, 650/53, Ced, IN RW, JP
1979 - Ryoji Matsuoka No.40, 650/53, Ced, IN RW, JP
2014 - Hermanos Camps Master Nº 3, 650/52, CA Ced, MG RW, Banyoles, ES

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Alexander Kalil
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Re: Fernando Sor, Opus 35 - shall we learn it together?

Post by Alexander Kalil » Fri May 24, 2019 12:52 pm

You guys are moving really fast, keep at it. I've just listened to the last few recordings posted and have a few remarks, here they are in reverse order of posts:

@MikeJay #8 - The B in the first four measures need to sound twice as long; it is forming a waltz rhythm with the two notes of the lower voice. Similarly, the three notes in m.4 of the third section (notes B# C# E) need to sound twice as long, again like a waltz rhythm. Otherwise well done.

@Jorge #9 - Good job on shaping the bass line which I think is the melody here. But there's a consistent galop in your pimi arpeggio which I think you need to work on separately; practice the basic pimi arpeggio with any chord progression you chose, focus on all four notes' sounding even; pay attention especially to inadvertent RH accents arising from abrupt LH position changes.

@mmcnb #5 - Technically you've mastered the study. Perhaps you'd like to add a little bit of dynamic variation in particular, as the current recording is just one volume from beginning to end. Also note that both D's in the 5th from last measure are sharp.

@nico #1 & #2 - Very musical renditions and with good expression. But why is #2 played staccato all through? I think it sounds better legato, even if the chord changes become harder; perhaps worth a try.

MikeJay #3 & #6 - Both played musically and with good expression. There are many notes and chords that come out staccato within otherwise smoothly connected phrases. Nothing wrong in principle, but it is important to always make sure than any staccato articulation is musically intended and not the inadvertent result of bad fingering or technical weaknesses to be addressed. Finally, in m.12 of #6 the second note middle voice you play a G instead of A - intended?

Hope any of these remarks to be of help to you guys, and keep up the good work!

Smudger5150
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Re: Fernando Sor, Opus 35 - shall we learn it together?

Post by Smudger5150 » Fri May 24, 2019 12:53 pm

I have finally got around to recording with my new setup based on Jorge's iRig microphone with iphone and here is my 1st recording for this thread. My 1st recording for posting onto the delcamp site period.

Listening to recordings from others, especially Jorge and Yisrael, the sound or tone of my recording isn't as nice and I'm not entirely happy with it.

It may be a combination of technique, guitar and/or old guitar strings. My guitar is a 2nd hand Tanglewood and I still have the same strings that were on it when I bought it.
I do have some nail length but I don't focus on maintaining these perfectly but I was wondering if I need to focus on my tone production a bit more. Maybe make the notes a little less staccato.

I did try to change the tone at one point by playing nearer the bridge (ponticello) for one phrase then moving it towards the fretboard later (sul tasto) but it doesn't stand out clearly to my mind. But as I was told by my last guitar teacher (who I need to resume lessons with!), you sometimes need to exaggerate the dynamics that you play because the audience will not hear the variations as easily as you the player. And I guess that works for recording too.

However, I've finally got started on this and let me know your thoughts.
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"Music washes away the dust of every day life." Art Blakey

"If I don’t practice for a day, I know it. If I don’t practice for two days, the critics know it. And if I don’t practice for three days, the public knows it." Louis Armstrong

powderedtoastman
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Re: Fernando Sor, Opus 35 - shall we learn it together?

Post by powderedtoastman » Fri May 24, 2019 5:25 pm

mmcnabb wrote:
Fri May 24, 2019 2:53 am

In all honesty I don't hear what it is you're hearing - but I'm recording in a basement with hard surfaces all around me and there are plenty of environment noises as well. Could be the AC running :lol: Is there any chance you can listen to the updated recording and see if you still hear the resonance?
This second take is very nice!
I'm still hearing something fairly constant and relatively low pitch in the background. Oddly it sounds pretty well matched to your G pitch same as I felt before, but now that you mention AC or other background noises, it seems very likely it's not coming from the guitar. I don't think you could have something that sustained from unintended guitar noise.

If it helps I'm listening through headphones; maybe through speakers it wouldn't be as obvious.

powderedtoastman
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Re: Fernando Sor, Opus 35 - shall we learn it together?

Post by powderedtoastman » Fri May 24, 2019 5:55 pm

Alexander Kalil wrote:
Fri May 24, 2019 12:52 pm
You guys are moving really fast, keep at it. I've just listened to the last few recordings posted and have a few remarks, here they are in reverse order of posts:

@MikeJay #8 - The B in the first four measures need to sound twice as long; it is forming a waltz rhythm with the two notes of the lower voice. Similarly, the three notes in m.4 of the third section (notes B# C# E) need to sound twice as long, again like a waltz rhythm. Otherwise well done.

@Jorge #9 - Good job on shaping the bass line which I think is the melody here. But there's a consistent galop in your pimi arpeggio which I think you need to work on separately; practice the basic pimi arpeggio with any chord progression you chose, focus on all four notes' sounding even; pay attention especially to inadvertent RH accents arising from abrupt LH position changes.

@mmcnb #5 - Technically you've mastered the study. Perhaps you'd like to add a little bit of dynamic variation in particular, as the current recording is just one volume from beginning to end. Also note that both D's in the 5th from last measure are sharp.

@nico #1 & #2 - Very musical renditions and with good expression. But why is #2 played staccato all through? I think it sounds better legato, even if the chord changes become harder; perhaps worth a try.

MikeJay #3 & #6 - Both played musically and with good expression. There are many notes and chords that come out staccato within otherwise smoothly connected phrases. Nothing wrong in principle, but it is important to always make sure than any staccato articulation is musically intended and not the inadvertent result of bad fingering or technical weaknesses to be addressed. Finally, in m.12 of #6 the second note middle voice you play a G instead of A - intended?

Hope any of these remarks to be of help to you guys, and keep up the good work!
Thank you for participating in this thread, you are an excellent player based on what I've heard from you so I know we can value your advice and suggestions!

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Jorge Oliveira
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Re: Fernando Sor, Opus 35 - shall we learn it together?

Post by Jorge Oliveira » Fri May 24, 2019 6:05 pm

mmcnabb wrote:
Thu May 23, 2019 2:48 am
...

UPDATE 5/23/2019:

Here's another take that I think is a bit more polished :

Sor Op. 35 No. 5
I agree with powderedtoastman, this second take of the #5 is impeccable. Time to move on, for sure :D.

With this new version of the #5, the Table of Posted Records becomes:

Sor's Opus 35 recorded pieces as of 24May19.png

The corresponding Excel file (TPR) is stored in my Google Drive and any Forum Member can download and use it at any time. By pointing to any particular post, the reader will have available not only the sound or video file but also all the subsequent comments made by other Forum members. Mind you, the link to posts provided in this Excel file does not work in the iPhone and in the iPad (being lodged in the Google Drive, Google interferes with the Microsoft Excel file trying to convert it to an equivalent Google spreadsheet... too bad, unfortunately :cry:).
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.
1972 - Kuniharu Nobe #8, 658/52, Spr, IN RW, Tokyo, JP
1976 - Ryoji Matsuoka No.50, 650/53, Ced, IN RW, JP
1979 - Ryoji Matsuoka No.40, 650/53, Ced, IN RW, JP
2014 - Hermanos Camps Master Nº 3, 650/52, CA Ced, MG RW, Banyoles, ES

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Jorge Oliveira
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Re: Fernando Sor, Opus 35 - shall we learn it together?

Post by Jorge Oliveira » Fri May 24, 2019 8:09 pm

Smudger5150 wrote:
Fri May 24, 2019 12:53 pm
I have finally got around to recording with my new setup based on Jorge's iRig microphone with iphone and here is my 1st recording for this thread. My 1st recording for posting onto the delcamp site period.

Listening to recordings from others, especially Jorge and Yisrael, the sound or tone of my recording isn't as nice and I'm not entirely happy with it.

It may be a combination of technique, guitar and/or old guitar strings. My guitar is a 2nd hand Tanglewood and I still have the same strings that were on it when I bought it.
I do have some nail length but I don't focus on maintaining these perfectly but I was wondering if I need to focus on my tone production a bit more. Maybe make the notes a little less staccato.

I did try to change the tone at one point by playing nearer the bridge (ponticello) for one phrase then moving it towards the fretboard later (sul tasto) but it doesn't stand out clearly to my mind. But as I was told by my last guitar teacher (who I need to resume lessons with!), you sometimes need to exaggerate the dynamics that you play because the audience will not hear the variations as easily as you the player. And I guess that works for recording too.

However, I've finally got started on this and let me know your thoughts.
Hi Smudger5150:

I'm quite happy to know that your very first record in the Delcamp Forum was posted in this thread :D. I hope you will become an active participant in it. The purpose of this thread is for us all to learn together how to play classical guitar to the best of our individual abilities and, while doing so, having also great fun. Welcome, then.

Now, concerning your rendition, I consider it quite good. The tempo is all right and so is the rhythm along the piece. It has some imperfections but if you play it daily, a couple of times, as part of your warm up period, they will go and you will end up playing it in a more assertive and, perhaps, slightly faster way (if you wish so, of course). I consider it, then, "learned", and it is time for you to move on into the #2.

As for the tone, which you say you are not happy with, there are a couple of things that you ought to look into:
  1. First, the guitar itself. You say you have a second hand Tanglewood. Being a second hand instrument, provided it is properly adjusted from the mechanical point of view and was protected from excessive humidity (does it have a case?), can even be an advantage, as the passing of the years turns the wood drier and drier and the sound quality gets better. Naturally, each wooden based instrument is unique, and some classical guitars are better than others (Tanglewood is more known as a manufacturer of acoustic guitars. Yours is a classical guitar, no?).
  2. Secondly, the strings. Well, some of the trebles seem to be rattling here and there. If you don't know how old the strings are, well, just replace them for a new set. A D'Addario EJ45 Pro-Arte Nylon, Normal Tension set will be fine to start with. You see, you can have an excellent guitar but if the strings are weared out no reasonable sound can be produced... and vice-versa.
  3. Finally, your nails. If, as I, you are lucky enough to have strong nails, cut them short - 1 or two millimetres above the tip of the RH fingers - and file them in a round way, straightening them a bit on the left side when you are looking at them from the back of your hand (look at this clip on You Tube to inspire you). By the way, the best and single file I use is a ClassyLady Glass Nail type.
Once you have paid attention to the simple things above, you can then try different ways of attacking the strings to get the right tone.

With this rendition of yours I created a new line for you in the Table of Posted Records (TPR):

Sor's Opus 35 recorded pieces as of 24May19.png

The corresponding Excel file (TPR) is stored in my Google Drive and any Forum Member can download and use it at any time. By pointing to any particular post, the reader will have available not only the sound or video file but also all the subsequent comments made by other Forum members. Mind you, the link to posts provided in this Excel file does not work in the iPhone and in the iPad (being lodged in the Google Drive, Google interferes with the Microsoft Excel file trying to convert it to an equivalent Google spreadsheet... too bad, unfortunately :cry:).
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.
1972 - Kuniharu Nobe #8, 658/52, Spr, IN RW, Tokyo, JP
1976 - Ryoji Matsuoka No.50, 650/53, Ced, IN RW, JP
1979 - Ryoji Matsuoka No.40, 650/53, Ced, IN RW, JP
2014 - Hermanos Camps Master Nº 3, 650/52, CA Ced, MG RW, Banyoles, ES

nico
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Re: Fernando Sor, Opus 35 - shall we learn it together?

Post by nico » Fri May 24, 2019 8:40 pm

I'm now posting Sor's Opus 35 #9 for you all to listen to and comment.
Congratulations with this last rendition Jorge! Specially because you didn't use that metronome and dared to do the recording without it, it sound much more lively! :bravo:
Sorry for my late reaction, at the moment I've not much internet because we're sailing for e few days, only using an IPad ......
Amazing that you are playing this whole piece by head, whitout using the scores! It sounds very good, nice rhythm, strong playing, sometimes a very musical interpretation of the scores, like the transition from m.32 to 33. Also that you give the bass line such an (just a little bit too long) important role, for it is indeed the melodic line. But I hear next to this melodic bass-line a second voice that is going with it, mostly on the second and fourth beat of the measure. You could give it a try to give those counts a little accent too, specially in measure 6 and 7 when going up to the end of the first phrase. ..... :)
Hermanos Camps CL-20-S

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MikeJay
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Re: Fernando Sor, Opus 35 - shall we learn it together?

Post by MikeJay » Sat May 25, 2019 1:10 pm

Alexander Kalil wrote:
Fri May 24, 2019 12:52 pm

@MikeJay #8 - The B in the first four measures need to sound twice as long; it is forming a waltz rhythm with the two notes of the lower voice. Similarly, the three notes in m.4 of the third section (notes B# C# E) need to sound twice as long, again like a waltz rhythm. Otherwise well done.

MikeJay #3 & #6 - Both played musically and with good expression. There are many notes and chords that come out staccato within otherwise smoothly connected phrases. Nothing wrong in principle, but it is important to always make sure than any staccato articulation is musically intended and not the inadvertent result of bad fingering or technical weaknesses to be addressed. Finally, in m.12 of #6 the second note middle voice you play a G instead of A - intended?

Hope any of these remarks to be of help to you guys, and keep up the good work!
Hello Alexander,

Thanks for your careful listening and very useful comments.

On #8, your are right, I still didn't get the rhythm right. Your suggestion of thinking "waltz" is very useful. I worked on it this morning and recorded it again (attached below). I think I got the right feel this time.

On numbers 3 and 8, any lack of legato is unintentional, particularly for 3. As a result of these frequent record/listen cycles, I've become more aware that I need to improve on precision in general. Hopefully it will come with time. As for G instead of A, oops!

Here we go again on #8:
Opus_35_no_8.wma
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Jorge Oliveira
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Re: Fernando Sor, Opus 35 - shall we learn it together?

Post by Jorge Oliveira » Sat May 25, 2019 1:58 pm

Alexander Kalil wrote:
Fri May 24, 2019 12:52 pm
You guys are moving really fast, keep at it. I've just listened to the last few recordings posted and have a few remarks, here they are in reverse order of posts:
...
@Jorge #9 - Good job on shaping the bass line which I think is the melody here. But there's a consistent galop in your pimi arpeggio which I think you need to work on separately; practice the basic pimi arpeggio with any chord progression you chose, focus on all four notes' sounding even; pay attention especially to inadvertent RH accents arising from abrupt LH position changes.
...
Hope any of these remarks to be of help to you guys, and keep up the good work!
Many thanks for stepping in, Alexander, you comments and observations are always valuable and most welcome. As for my #9, after reading all the remarks made about it, I listened again and... gosh!... it's horrible, I don't like it myself, it's patent that I'm staying too long on the first bass note of the arpeggio, effectively "changing the score", as Yisrael remarked. The funny thing is that, technically, I have no problem whatsoever in making the four notes sound evenly spaced and that was the case when I was playing with a metronome. But as I wanted, firstly, to increase the tempo and, secondly, to slow down a bit (ritardando) in between phrases (what do you think? Is it acceptable, or should I stick to the score?), I had to take the metronome out of my left ear :lol:... and the result was disastrous. Right, I'm addressing now this problem and I'll post a new rendition soon.
1972 - Kuniharu Nobe #8, 658/52, Spr, IN RW, Tokyo, JP
1976 - Ryoji Matsuoka No.50, 650/53, Ced, IN RW, JP
1979 - Ryoji Matsuoka No.40, 650/53, Ced, IN RW, JP
2014 - Hermanos Camps Master Nº 3, 650/52, CA Ced, MG RW, Banyoles, ES

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Jorge Oliveira
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Re: Fernando Sor, Opus 35 - shall we learn it together?

Post by Jorge Oliveira » Sat May 25, 2019 3:03 pm

nico wrote:
Fri May 24, 2019 8:40 pm
I'm now posting Sor's Opus 35 #9 for you all to listen to and comment.
Congratulations with this last rendition Jorge! Specially because you didn't use that metronome and dared to do the recording without it, it sound much more lively! :bravo:
...
Many thanks, nico, for your nice words, they are most welcome. Nevertheless, it seems that this rendition of mine still has to be improved. I'm working on it. And what about your #3? Learning it? Not an easy one...
1972 - Kuniharu Nobe #8, 658/52, Spr, IN RW, Tokyo, JP
1976 - Ryoji Matsuoka No.50, 650/53, Ced, IN RW, JP
1979 - Ryoji Matsuoka No.40, 650/53, Ced, IN RW, JP
2014 - Hermanos Camps Master Nº 3, 650/52, CA Ced, MG RW, Banyoles, ES

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Jorge Oliveira
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Location: Cascais, Portugal

Re: Fernando Sor, Opus 35 - shall we learn it together?

Post by Jorge Oliveira » Sat May 25, 2019 3:10 pm

MikeJay wrote:
Sat May 25, 2019 1:10 pm
...

Hello Alexander,

Thanks for your careful listening and very useful comments.

On #8, your are right, I still didn't get the rhythm right. Your suggestion of thinking "waltz" is very useful. I worked on it this morning and recorded it again (attached below). I think I got the right feel this time.

On numbers 3 and 8, any lack of legato is unintentional, particularly for 3. As a result of these frequent record/listen cycles, I've become more aware that I need to improve on precision in general. Hopefully it will come with time. As for G instead of A, oops!

Here we go again on #8:
Opus_35_no_8.wma
Way better, Mike, I think. A beautiful melody this #8. Not so with the #6 which I just started... not an easy one, for sure.

With this new record of yours, the Table of Posted Records (TPR) becomes:

Sor's Opus 35 recorded pieces as of 25May19.png

The corresponding Excel file (TPR) is stored in my Google Drive and any Forum Member can download and use it at any time. By pointing to any particular post, the reader will have available not only the sound or video file but also all the subsequent comments made by other Forum members. Mind you, the link to posts provided in this Excel file does not work in the iPhone and in the iPad (being lodged in the Google Drive, Google interferes with the Microsoft Excel file trying to convert it to an equivalent Google spreadsheet... too bad, unfortunately :cry:).
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.
1972 - Kuniharu Nobe #8, 658/52, Spr, IN RW, Tokyo, JP
1976 - Ryoji Matsuoka No.50, 650/53, Ced, IN RW, JP
1979 - Ryoji Matsuoka No.40, 650/53, Ced, IN RW, JP
2014 - Hermanos Camps Master Nº 3, 650/52, CA Ced, MG RW, Banyoles, ES

powderedtoastman
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Re: Fernando Sor, Opus 35 - shall we learn it together?

Post by powderedtoastman » Sat May 25, 2019 5:03 pm

MikeJay wrote:
Sat May 25, 2019 1:10 pm
Alexander Kalil wrote:
Fri May 24, 2019 12:52 pm

@MikeJay #8 - The B in the first four measures need to sound twice as long; it is forming a waltz rhythm with the two notes of the lower voice. Similarly, the three notes in m.4 of the third section (notes B# C# E) need to sound twice as long, again like a waltz rhythm. Otherwise well done.

MikeJay #3 & #6 - Both played musically and with good expression. There are many notes and chords that come out staccato within otherwise smoothly connected phrases. Nothing wrong in principle, but it is important to always make sure than any staccato articulation is musically intended and not the inadvertent result of bad fingering or technical weaknesses to be addressed. Finally, in m.12 of #6 the second note middle voice you play a G instead of A - intended?

Hope any of these remarks to be of help to you guys, and keep up the good work!
Hello Alexander,

Thanks for your careful listening and very useful comments.

On #8, your are right, I still didn't get the rhythm right. Your suggestion of thinking "waltz" is very useful. I worked on it this morning and recorded it again (attached below). I think I got the right feel this time.

On numbers 3 and 8, any lack of legato is unintentional, particularly for 3. As a result of these frequent record/listen cycles, I've become more aware that I need to improve on precision in general. Hopefully it will come with time. As for G instead of A, oops!

Here we go again on #8:
Opus_35_no_8.wma
Sounding better but you still need a bit of adjustment to the rhythm. Your first measure almost sounds like 5/16 to me instead of 3/8

Let's look at just the pickup and the first measure... I think we can break it down into two discrete choices for duration.
Let's call an 8th note "long" and a 16th note "short" and note that the duration of our "long" beat should be exactly twice that of the short.

Then you have two long beats of silence leading up to the pickup note, and then your actual notes are:
long, short short short short long

I would set the metronome to what you want the 16th note to be, and make sure that your "long" 8th notes span two clicks.
You can try clapping the beats to see if you can get that, and then maybe play notes but not the actual notes from the piece, just do the rhythm on one open string.
Next since you'll be doing an arpeggio across multiple strings, try to get it with the actual strings and fingers you'll be using with the right hand, but you can keep the left hand off the guitar and still don't play the actual notes. Since you don't have much trouble actually finding the right notes in the right order this one may be a little less important.

The last thing you can do is count the rhythm out loud.
Normally we count 16th notes as "1-e-and-a" but since the time signature is based on 8th notes, I would count the 8th notes as one-two-three or sixteenths as one-and-two-and, etc.

So, just the pickups and first two measures should count as:

"Three, one and two and three, one and two and three" (edit: noting that the "threes" are twice as long as each syllable of "one and two and")

Lastly I'll leave you with a youtube link to somebody who has played it very nicely as an example:


Hopefully these ideas will help you some!

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Yisrael van Handel
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Re: Fernando Sor, Opus 35 - shall we learn it together?

Post by Yisrael van Handel » Sun May 26, 2019 5:54 am

Smudger5150 wrote:
Fri May 24, 2019 12:53 pm
However, I've finally got started on this and let me know your thoughts.
Hi, Smudger5150,
You understood the score well. Do you have some musical background? I think the first order of business needs to be to eliminate the gaps between notes. I have not figured out where that is coming from. I would forget about tone and dynamics for now, until you can play without gaps. That should also solve the problem of the half-notes (blancos) in the melody, which need to be held their full length. All left-hand fingers should be held down until they are needed elsewhere. However, that is obviously not the source of the gaps, because you have the problem even on open strings. Are you using rest strokes in the melody? Make sure that your right hand does not interfere with strings that are supposed to be playing. Are you using a very light, relaxed touch in both hands? Fretting notes as close to the fret as possible (when you do that, it takes very little pressure to hold down the note)?
I hope this helps. Keep up the good work.
I forgot to mention: are you using normal strings, not too old? If you do not know what strings to get, start with D'Addario ProArte Normal Tension EJ45. If your guitar has high action, then it will be much harder to play. You can compensate for that a little bit by using Light Tension strings, EJ43.
Yisrael van Handel
Modi'in Ilit, Israel

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MikeJay
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Re: Fernando Sor, Opus 35 - shall we learn it together?

Post by MikeJay » Sun May 26, 2019 6:27 am

powderedtoastman wrote:
Sat May 25, 2019 5:03 pm
...

Sounding better but you still need a bit of adjustment to the rhythm. Your first measure almost sounds like 5/16 to me instead of 3/8

Let's look at just the pickup and the first measure... I think we can break it down into two discrete choices for duration.
Let's call an 8th note "long" and a 16th note "short" and note that the duration of our "long" beat should be exactly twice that of the short.

Then you have two long beats of silence leading up to the pickup note, and then your actual notes are:
long, short short short short long

I would set the metronome to what you want the 16th note to be, and make sure that your "long" 8th notes span two clicks.
You can try clapping the beats to see if you can get that, and then maybe play notes but not the actual notes from the piece, just do the rhythm on one open string.
Next since you'll be doing an arpeggio across multiple strings, try to get it with the actual strings and fingers you'll be using with the right hand, but you can keep the left hand off the guitar and still don't play the actual notes. Since you don't have much trouble actually finding the right notes in the right order this one may be a little less important.

The last thing you can do is count the rhythm out loud.
Normally we count 16th notes as "1-e-and-a" but since the time signature is based on 8th notes, I would count the 8th notes as one-two-three or sixteenths as one-and-two-and, etc.

So, just the pickups and first two measures should count as:

"Three, one and two and three, one and two and three" (edit: noting that the "threes" are twice as long as each syllable of "one and two and")

Lastly I'll leave you with a youtube link to somebody who has played it very nicely as an example:
...

Hopefully these ideas will help you some!
Ah yes, I see what you mean. I'm still rushing the eighth notes. I'll try your suggestion but not before tomorrow -- other things to do today. And thanks for the helpful link -- very elegant playing. Your comments are much appreciated.

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