Having more than one guitar

Discussions relating to the classical guitar which don't fit elsewhere.
Bemus07
Posts: 5
Joined: Sat Jan 05, 2019 8:53 pm

Having more than one guitar

Post by Bemus07 » Thu Feb 07, 2019 11:00 pm

What are the benefits of having more than one classical guitar? I ask because although I have a Taurus model 59, and soon to add a model 56 to the collection, my guitar tutor said earlier, "what are you going to do with two classical guitars?"

Apart from playing one at a time, he makes a relatively good argument and it did make me think. Unlike electric, e.g. strat, tele, Les Paul, the differences between what are essentially the same guitar are, I suspect, going to be negligible at best. However, for me it's not just about the tonal qualities, it's about having a piece of art, history, and workmanship. I value all these traits in an instrument and look at the classical guitar in awe, much more than I do its electric counterpart.

So what is it that benefits you having more than one guitar? I'd genuinely be interested to hear your thoughts. :)

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Mollbarre
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Joined: Sat Jan 12, 2019 2:10 am
Location: Canada

Re: Having more than one guitar

Post by Mollbarre » Thu Feb 07, 2019 11:09 pm

No real benefit, unless you have a "good" one, and an outdoor/travel one, and you use both enough to warrant having two.

I decided to keep my first one just because. Didn't want to sell it for a big loss - and, it IS nice to look at. :D Plus, they are a little different. The first one is a full size classical, the new one is a crossover. Quality is comparable.

Maybe I'll learn something of interest if I ever switch between the two...
2016 Fender CN320AS
2018 Cordoba C10 crossover
2018 Ibanez GA5TCE
...and miscellaneous bits and pieces.

Chuah Hui Hsien
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Joined: Tue Dec 18, 2018 7:27 am
Location: Penang, Malaysia

Re: Having more than one guitar

Post by Chuah Hui Hsien » Fri Feb 08, 2019 12:13 am

Well, I have a few at the moment,three of them are 65cm,one 64cm and another is 61cm.My main purpose is to exploring different scale lengths and listen to various combination of tone woods, for example spruce/Indian Rosewood, cedar/IR, spruce/maple, cedar/mahogany.I am willing to try out more exotic woods if I have the ability to commision another,but this time would a 63cm.

All the above guitars are traditional fan struts,I'm curious with double top but not lattice top.

Another advantage of having more than one guitar is, if you put on the wrong tension of strings on one,or you simply don't like the way the tone projected, you can tear them down immediately and "recycle" on another one.No waste of money, I often do that.
2017 Karel Dedain Spruce/Maple (Torres) 64cm
1998 Yamaha GD 10, Spruce/IRW 65cm
1988 Alhambra AL 8, Cedar/IRW 65cm

powderedtoastman
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Joined: Sat Feb 20, 2016 1:15 am
Location: Sunnyvale, CA

Re: Having more than one guitar

Post by powderedtoastman » Fri Feb 08, 2019 1:11 am

You could argue it's good to have a backup around. But mainly the benefit for me of having more than one guitar, is that it makes me happy in some way. Most other reasons are probably pretty superficial. And that's OK!

mike223
Posts: 24
Joined: Wed Jan 23, 2019 2:42 am

Re: Having more than one guitar

Post by mike223 » Fri Feb 08, 2019 2:10 am

I'm waiting for the.... Wife to say... Why do you have so many guitars you can only play one at a time..... Wait for it...... Way do you have so many shoe you can only wear one pair at a time...... Waiting for that moment

mcg
Posts: 30
Joined: Sat Jan 12, 2019 4:21 am

Re: Having more than one guitar

Post by mcg » Fri Feb 08, 2019 4:27 am

I think it's best to have one guitar that you perform on and do all your practice on.

If you take Segovia, Bream, Williams etc, they all had one guitar that they used exclusively at any one time (as far as I know). They didn't play one night on one guitar and another on the next. They had an exclusive relationship with one instrument at any one time. For obvious reasons.

I imagine that leading violinists, cellists etc are the same in having a relationship with one key instrument.

If you teach then you need a second relatively expendible guitar for that purpose.

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muirtan
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Joined: Thu May 01, 2008 10:00 pm
Location: Norfolk, UK

Re: Having more than one guitar

Post by muirtan » Fri Feb 08, 2019 8:38 am

mcg wrote:
Fri Feb 08, 2019 4:27 am
I think it's best to have one guitar that you perform on and do all your practice on.

If you take Segovia, Bream, Williams etc, they all had one guitar that they used exclusively at any one time (as far as I know). They didn't play one night on one guitar and another on the next. They had an exclusive relationship with one instrument at any one time. For obvious reasons.

I imagine that leading violinists, cellists etc are the same in having a relationship with one key instrument.

If you teach then you need a second relatively expendible guitar for that purpose.
I remember a concert of William's I went to where he played 2 different guitars. The reason being so that he could have one tuned differently and save having to retune. I think it was 4 strings tuned differently.

I have 2 guitars but very different in sound quality. It's interesting to explore and compare the different resonances. I do find one slightly easier on the hands to play. I only take one of them to play outside the house for jam and open mic sessions the other stays securely at home.

rwe
Posts: 112
Joined: Mon Dec 11, 2017 12:02 am

Re: Having more than one guitar

Post by rwe » Fri Feb 08, 2019 9:15 am

Different Locations (I store some instruments at my parents' home in another town), different sounds (spruce / maple with nylgut strings sounds different to cedar / makassar with carbon string) for different music (Renaissance music vs. Latin American), a backup Instrument to the main instrument.

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petermc61
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Location: Sydney, Australia

Re: Having more than one guitar

Post by petermc61 » Fri Feb 08, 2019 10:19 am

Bemus07 wrote:
Thu Feb 07, 2019 11:00 pm
.....my guitar tutor said earlier, "what are you going to do with two classical guitars?"
I hope your guitar tutor never meets me. :lol:

Stewart Kelly
Posts: 27
Joined: Thu Feb 07, 2019 9:11 pm

Re: Having more than one guitar

Post by Stewart Kelly » Fri Feb 08, 2019 10:52 am

I’d say the main benefit of having more than one guitar is that it can help you discover different ways to play a piece of music, as different guitars can draw us to different sounds or attack on the strings etc
Guitar - Christopher Dean 2013 (Spruce)

GerryM
Posts: 50
Joined: Sat Jan 26, 2019 5:33 pm

Re: Having more than one guitar

Post by GerryM » Fri Feb 08, 2019 12:29 pm

I'm waiting for the.... Wife to say... Why do you have so many guitars you can only play one at a time..... Wait for it...... Way do you have so many shoe you can only wear one pair at a time...... Waiting for that moment
I would use that except unfortunately my wife buys a lot of her shoes at PayLess and I am afraid she would limit me to guitars of the same value :D .

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bear
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Location: Massachusetts

Re: Having more than one guitar

Post by bear » Fri Feb 08, 2019 1:30 pm

Bemus07 wrote:
Thu Feb 07, 2019 11:00 pm

Unlike electric, e.g. strat, tele, Les Paul, the differences between what are essentially the same guitar are, I suspect, going to be negligible at best.
Each of my guitars has a completely different sound from the others. To the uninitiated, my Ramirez and Rodriquez look the same, the sound is different. I had an old Ensenada (that was made in Mexico). It was a "look a like" to the Rodriquez and Ramirez and although a cheaper guitar, I thought it had a better sound.
Like electrics, there are some pieces that will sound better on one guitar than it does on the others. Each guitar has it's own qualities, hence all of the thoughts about brace patterns, tone woods, types of strings, etc..
Types of electrics have a reputation for uniformity, "the strat sound" for example. I was reading a book by Julia Crowe "My First Guitar: Tales of True Love and Lost Chords". She interviewed famous guitar players. Many of them said that they had owned a guitar, a strat, tele, Les Paul, etc. that had a unique tone that they never found in any other same make and model. - good book by the way.
I was just reading an interview with Sharon Isbin, and she echoed similar sentiments about her guitar when speaking about switching from Humphrey to her newest (sorry, can't recall the name, luthier from Germany).
2019 Gretsch G9126 432mm
2013 Jeff Medlin '37 Hauser 640mm sp
2006 Michele Della Giustina Concert 10 string 650mm ce
2005 Jose Ramirez 4E 650mm ce
2005 Manuel Rodriguez Model C3F 650mm sp
2003 Manuel Rodriguez Model D 650mm ce

Leo
Posts: 472
Joined: Wed Dec 28, 2011 3:45 am
Location: Bay Area, California

Re: Having more than one guitar

Post by Leo » Fri Feb 08, 2019 3:11 pm

bear wrote:
Fri Feb 08, 2019 1:30 pm
Bemus07 wrote:
Thu Feb 07, 2019 11:00 pm

Unlike electric, e.g. strat, tele, Les Paul, the differences between what are essentially the same guitar are, I suspect, going to be negligible at best.
Each of my guitars has a completely different sound from the others. To the uninitiated, my Ramirez and Rodriquez look the same, the sound is different. I had an old Ensenada (that was made in Mexico). It was a "look a like" to the Rodriquez and Ramirez and although a cheaper guitar, I thought it had a better sound.
Like electrics, there are some pieces that will sound better on one guitar than it does on the others. Each guitar has it's own qualities, hence all of the thoughts about brace patterns, tone woods, types of strings, etc..
Types of electrics have a reputation for uniformity, "the strat sound" for example. I was reading a book by Julia Crowe "My First Guitar: Tales of True Love and Lost Chords". She interviewed famous guitar players. Many of them said that they had owned a guitar, a strat, tele, Les Paul, etc. that had a unique tone that they never found in any other same make and model. - good book by the way.
I was just reading an interview with Sharon Isbin, and she echoed similar sentiments about her guitar when speaking about switching from Humphrey to her newest (sorry, can't recall the name, luthier from Germany).
Yes, I own 3 different classical guitars, and each one has a different sound from the other. One is heavy in bass sounds with regular nylon strings, so it requires specific types of strings to help balance the sound. My luthier guitar is very balanced in tone across the strings, and has a nice richness in sound. The third guitar is also rich in sound, but more of a deep Spanish Ramirez type. Each guitar is also of different wood types and bracing patterns.
2012 Hippner, Spruce-birdseye maple
1985 Takamine C-132S
2002 Casa Montalvo, Spruce, Ziricote

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Hotsoup
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Joined: Fri Aug 07, 2015 6:11 pm
Location: Bellingham, WA (USA)

Re: Having more than one guitar

Post by Hotsoup » Fri Feb 08, 2019 3:50 pm

I have two (classical) guitars at the moment, one Romanillos style and a Hauser style. They sound and respond very different from each other, and that scratches different itches for me. Right now I don't think I have the available bandwidth for more than two.

riffmeister
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Location: Philadelphia, PA, USA

Re: Having more than one guitar

Post by riffmeister » Fri Feb 08, 2019 3:57 pm

I have multiple classical guitars. While they do all sound like nylon string acoustic guitars, there are some subltle and not so subtle differences in sound/response and they all feel slightly different under my fingers. I usually wind up playing one for several weeks, then changing guitars to get a 'fresh perspective'. It's a luxury for sure, but I really do enjoy it.

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