If you like Sor...

Discussions relating to the classical guitar which don't fit elsewhere.
RobMacKillop
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If you like Sor...

Post by RobMacKillop » Fri Feb 08, 2019 8:56 am

you might like the music of Fernando Ferandiere (1740-1816). He flourished in Spain in the late 18th, early 19th-century, wrote no less than six guitar concerti - none of which survive - lots of guitar chamber music, including great guitar duets, and solo music. Sadly, very little of his music survives, but what does is very interesting.

He wrote for what is known as a six-course guitar - the link between the five-course baroque guitar and the six-single-strings classical guitar. Both Sor and Aguado played such guitars in their youth. I would love to have one, but the expense of commissioning one is beyond me. I did, though, play the original 6c-guitar by Pages belonging to Jim Westbrook. Obviously his music can and probably was at times, performed on a 6-string classical, as the double-strung instrument was dying out in the early years of the 19th century.

Tecla Editions publish his wonderful duets, as well as his Arte de Tocar la Guitar Española (Madrid, 1899). The latter comes with a biography by Brian Jefferey, which is well worth a read - fascinating stuff - a facsimile and translation, with all the music being also newly typeset.

I've been informed that some music by him has very recently come to light, so hopefully more publications will follow.

Here are some videos, two of which I'm involved in, but first some chamber music:



A 6-course guitar:



All the music from his Arte de Tocar la Guitar Español, using some of Sor's right-hand techniques. They increase in difficulty, being from a Method book. I love numbers 4 and 6 especially.



One of his duets, one modern guitar (gut and silk strings) one brand new 6c guitar, when Jelma paid me a visit from Amsterdam. One rehearsal, one take. We were having fun, but there are one or two little slips.


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Mark Clifton-Gaultier
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Re: If you like Sor...

Post by Mark Clifton-Gaultier » Fri Feb 08, 2019 10:32 am

Good call Rob - it's heartening to hear Ferandiere being appreciated more as he's such an important example of the tradition which partly informed Sor's development. The duets in particular reveal a clear stylistic contrast with that of the Italians against whom Sor railed just a few years later.

I have the 1977 edition of "Tocar" - do you think that it's worth an upgrade?

I know that it's not your style (and absolutely no criticism intended) but do you think that some of the solo pieces are robust enough to stand up to a bit more gusto? I'm not totally convinced myself, yet I sometimes feel that we approach these old works with too much delicacy, even reverence where a violinist would relish the attack of a good, solid down-bow on occasion.

The guitar/6c examples benefitted a bit from that "off the cuff" attitude (in my not very humble opinion) and worked rather well as a combo. Nice.

RobMacKillop
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Re: If you like Sor...

Post by RobMacKillop » Fri Feb 08, 2019 11:40 am

Cheers, Mark.

I have both the old and new editions. The biography has been expended with a lot of new material, but the music is the same. Here's what Brian says:

====

This is a new 2013 edition of Fernando Ferandiere’s Arte de tocar la guitarra española (Madrid, 1799), a significant text in guitar history. I (Brian Jeffery) first published a facsimile edition of it in 1977, and here now is a new 2013 edition which includes:

– a complete facsimile reprint of the edition of Madrid 1799 edition.

– a new introduction of forty pages by me (Brian Jeffery) in both English and Spanish which brings our knowledge of Ferandiere up to date to 2013 and adds new information which is currently not available anywhere else. The complete text of this new introduction is printed in English, and then the complete text of the introduction is given again in Spanish.

– a complete English translation of Ferandiere’s text.

– and the musical examples from the original appendix, here also given additionally in modern notation.

181 pages. 16 x 23 cm (paperback size).

This is a book for anyone who is seriously interested in the history of the guitar

=====

As for giving it a bit of oomph, be my guest! :-)

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Mark Clifton-Gaultier
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Re: If you like Sor...

Post by Mark Clifton-Gaultier » Fri Feb 08, 2019 4:33 pm

RobMacKillop wrote:As for giving it a bit of oomph, be my guest!
Lol ... not having the benefit of your baby-soft, oil emolliated tips, oomph is generally what I do. I rather wondered what your opinion of such a rough-shod approach might be.
RobMacKillop wrote:This is a new 2013 edition ...a complete facsimile reprint ... a new introduction ... a complete English translation ... musical examples from the original appendix ...
Thanks for that Rob - just the new introduction of interest really as I have a facsimile already and like to make my own translations. If it shows up cheap second-hand I'll grab it.

Surprised that no one else has commented on the music - weird how some posts slip through.

Lovemyguitar
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Re: If you like Sor...

Post by Lovemyguitar » Fri Feb 08, 2019 6:25 pm

Thank you, Rob, for sharing this really delightful music with us! I like it very much, indeed, and you and the others play it with such joy, clearly demonstrating your enthusiasm for these wonderful pieces. Those 7 Lessons are a charming set of pieces which look (and sound) like great fun to play, and so I will definitely get a copy of Jeffery's second edition, both for the music and to read more about this hitherto unknown-to-me composer.

Thanks again, and cheers!

RobMacKillop
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Re: If you like Sor...

Post by RobMacKillop » Fri Feb 08, 2019 6:28 pm

Mark: Yes, people seem to avoid my posts these days, or avoid most people's posts. I put the black and white video above in the "Our Recordings of Classical Music" sub forum, where it still languishes without a comment. C'est la vie. I'm as guilty as anyone here about not listening to many of the uploads. It's okay.

I like to record things that are unfamiliar, and MUCH prefer to be saying, "Listen to this interesting music" than saying "Listen to me play this well-known piece". So it would be nice if we were all a little more adventurous in what we listen to. But I point the finger at no one but myself.

As for the oomph factor, I think this music could go either way. He was part of the movement to elevate the guitar above the irreverent strumming of the masses or gypsies, perhaps. So it could be played very elegantly. On the other hand, he was a Spaniard! :-)

Lovemyguitar: Thank you for your comments! Charming's the word. If you can afford it, the hardback edition is gorgeously printed!

crazyrach97
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Re: If you like Sor...

Post by crazyrach97 » Fri Feb 08, 2019 7:19 pm

Sigh... it never fails... Rob posts some videos, I buy more books. Lovely playing, Rob! I like your duet partner too, and thought the contrast between the two very different sounding guitars was really effective.

RobMacKillop
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Re: If you like Sor...

Post by RobMacKillop » Fri Feb 08, 2019 7:20 pm

Cheers, Rachel. Jelma is a wonderful player. I pointed the mic more at her than me :-)

DaveLloyd
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Re: If you like Sor...

Post by DaveLloyd » Fri Feb 08, 2019 11:49 pm

Fascinating post Rob!

Having never heard of Ferandiere before, I enjoyed all the videos. Thoroughly enjoyed listening to you and Jelma playing the duet. I liked the sound of the two instruments together, they complemented each other well, and it was fun to watch you both enjoying making good music.

As you suggested, it's very refreshing to hear something different.

Keep it coming!

Wuuthrad
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Re: If you like Sor...

Post by Wuuthrad » Sat Feb 09, 2019 6:25 am

Thanks a lot for sharing; very enjoyable to listen to, and also very much appreciated for the exposure to music worthy of closer study.
"Pay no attention to what the critics say. A statue has never been erected in honor of a critic." -Jean Sibelius

RobMacKillop
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Re: If you like Sor...

Post by RobMacKillop » Sat Feb 09, 2019 7:08 am

Cheers, folks. Glad you like it.

Cass Couvelas
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Re: If you like Sor...

Post by Cass Couvelas » Sat Feb 09, 2019 11:51 am

I thoroughly enjoyed the duet!

I often consider responding to posts and then conclude that it’s going to take me too long to craft a response that is actually worth airing.

But I am nevertheless hugely appreciative of posts which introduce me to composers or music I have never encountered before. So thank you!
"She ran the whole gamut of emotions from A to B."
(Dorothy Parker on Katharine Hepburn)

RobMacKillop
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Re: If you like Sor...

Post by RobMacKillop » Sat Feb 09, 2019 11:58 am

Cheers, Cass. Appreciated.

musicbyandy

Re: If you like Sor...

Post by musicbyandy » Tue Feb 12, 2019 9:42 pm

RobMacKillop wrote:
Fri Feb 08, 2019 8:56 am
you might like the music of Fernando Ferandiere (1740-1816).

Here are some videos, two of which I'm involved in, but first some chamber music:



How can I order the sheet music for the Trio?

RobMacKillop
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Location: Edinburgh

Re: If you like Sor...

Post by RobMacKillop » Tue Feb 12, 2019 9:54 pm

I don't know.

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