Apoyando notation

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Frank Nordberg

Apoyando notation

Post by Frank Nordberg » Tue Feb 19, 2013 4:17 am

What is the most common way to mark the notes that are to be played with a rest stroke?

Nick Cutroneo
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Re: Apoyando notation

Post by Nick Cutroneo » Tue Feb 19, 2013 4:46 am

I've always used ^ over the right hand fingering to indicate a rest stroke. If I use it for a series of notes, I'll just add a bracketed line over the notes it effects.
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attila57
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Re: Apoyando notation

Post by attila57 » Tue Feb 19, 2013 4:54 am

Hi Frank,

I don't know what's the most common marking system for the rest/free strokes. I think in printed sheet music commonly left hang fingering is marked, and sometimes, at difficult spots, there's some reference to the right hand configuration, but usually no apoyando/tirando marking.

I tell you about the simple markings I use in my sheet music. When I was a beginner, I liked to mark everything for myself in the sheet music (in pencil of course) to facilitate learning and lest I forget the fingering I'd memorized. Now, having more experience, I don't scribe so many things in the printed music any more, but sometimes still mark the the apoyando or tirando stroke, at a critical place or when a special setup is needed. In these places I mark the apoyando with an a/m/i/p underlined, and the tirando with a/m/i/p with a dot underneath (or nothing). I think it's a fast, effective and easy-to-remember system. The marking can easily be deleted with an eraser and corrected, if you happen to change your mind.

Attila :bye:
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Nick Payne
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Re: Apoyando notation

Post by Nick Payne » Tue Feb 19, 2013 5:01 am

There was some discussion of this topic here: viewtopic.php?f=6&t=68758

Frank Nordberg

Re: Apoyando notation

Post by Frank Nordberg » Tue Feb 19, 2013 5:26 am

Thanks to all of you for quick replies.

I should perhaps have mentioned that the reason I need apoyando notation is that I'm writing a couple of educational pieces where one of the aims is to teach the difference between free stroke and rest stroke.

The ^ notation makes sense but I'm a bit reluctant to use it since to me as a former jazz saxophonist that sign means a sharp, short attack - not at all what apoyando is about. The underlined fingering seems like a good idea too but it may be a bit too easy to overlook, besides I don't really want to add fingering indications to each and every apyando note in the peice I'm working on right now. Most of the time it's pretty obvious which finger should be used and I don't want to clutter up the score more than necessary.

How about combining the two? A small triangle above the note (that is essentially an underlined ^) - does that seem like a good idea?

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Re: Apoyando notation

Post by Nick Cutroneo » Tue Feb 19, 2013 5:38 am

Frank Nordberg wrote:Thanks to all of you for quick replies.

I should perhaps have mentioned that the reason I need apoyando notation is that I'm writing a couple of educational pieces where one of the aims is to teach the difference between free stroke and rest stroke.

The ^ notation makes sense but I'm a bit reluctant to use it since to me as a former jazz saxophonist that sign means a sharp, short attack - not at all what apoyando is about. The underlined fingering seems like a good idea too but it may be a bit too easy to overlook, besides I don't really want to add fingering indications to each and every apyando note in the peice I'm working on right now. Most of the time it's pretty obvious which finger should be used and I don't want to clutter up the score more than necessary.

How about combining the two? A small triangle above the note (that is essentially an underlined ^) - does that seem like a good idea?
The ^ marking goes over the Right Hand finger, not the note. Therefore it cannot be confused with an accent.
Nick Cutroneo - Classical Guitarist, performer/teacher/suzuki instructor

Frank Nordberg

Re: Apoyando notation

Post by Frank Nordberg » Tue Feb 19, 2013 6:03 am

Nick Cutroneo wrote:The ^ marking goes over the Right Hand finger, not the note. Therefore it cannot be confused with an accent.
Oh I see. That still doesn't solve the problem when there is no fingering though.

Here's the first line of the piece I'm working on right now (with triangles indicating apoyando):
apoyando notation.gif
As you can see, there is no real need for fingering indications throughout and I'd rather not add it if I can avoid it.
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JohnPierce

Re: Apoyando notation

Post by JohnPierce » Tue Feb 19, 2013 8:31 am

In so far as I can remember (I can't find the book at the moment) the early version of Shearer's method used a ^ for rest strokes and a small u for free strokes, both in the position where you have the triangles. He seems to have abandoned using either in the latest version. I like the triangle better than the ^ as it's easier to see.

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Re: Apoyando notation

Post by Nick Cutroneo » Tue Feb 19, 2013 2:11 pm

Frank Nordberg wrote: As you can see, there is no real need for fingering indications throughout and I'd rather not add it if I can avoid it.
I would then argue that there's no need to indicate Rest Strokes on each melody note then. If you aren't going to provide the fingering and it's a pattern that repeats, then I wouldn't include the Rest Stroke indication.

If I were doing a piece, I'd probably provide fingering for the first 2 measures, as it repeats again, provide the rest stroke indication, then put "sim" in the 3rd measure to indicate that the right hand fingering is repeated. When the pattern changes, obviously you'd provide that new fingering, and the rest stroke indications for that section/fingering.
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Bernhard Heimann
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Re: Apoyando notation

Post by Bernhard Heimann » Tue Feb 19, 2013 4:55 pm

In the Delcamp edition of the Sagreras "Lecciones" we use "^" for rest strokes / apoyando, no marking for free strokes.
You can see examples if you look at the published volume 1; it is available here
Julio S. Sagreras: Las Primeras Lecciones

Bernhard

arpisma

Re: Apoyando notation

Post by arpisma » Sat Sep 28, 2013 10:44 pm

Yes since Sagreras ''^'' is commonly accepted as the sign for apoyando on the classical guitar. You could also write a note at the end indicating that it stands for apoyando not for a random accent. I widely use notes on scores they make everything easier.

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Re: Apoyando notation

Post by Bill B » Sun Sep 29, 2013 1:37 am

I know it takes longer and takes up more room, but I like to use english, rather than symbols, if there is any chance for confusion. I dont like dots, dashes, or accent marks, as those all have other common musical meanings. in your example, I would write, "melody played with rest stroke." at the beginning.
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arpisma

Re: Apoyando notation

Post by arpisma » Sun Sep 29, 2013 11:19 am

Bill B wrote:I know it takes longer and takes up more room, but I like to use english, rather than symbols, if there is any chance for confusion. I dont like dots, dashes, or accent marks, as those all have other common musical meanings. in your example, I would write, "melody played with rest stroke." at the beginning.
that's a good piece of advice; agree.

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