Where to start?

Theory and practice of composition and arranging for classical guitar, discussion of works in progress, etc.
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Composers' Workshop
Theory and practice of composition and arranging for classical guitar, discussion of works in progress, etc.

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KeithD

Re: Where to start?

Post by KeithD » Tue Jan 14, 2014 3:00 pm

I know I've come to this late, but thanks for that link, Oliver. That's really useful.

Keith

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lucy
Posts: 1992
Joined: Mon Jun 16, 2008 8:33 pm
Location: England

Re: Where to start?

Post by lucy » Wed Jan 22, 2014 7:51 pm

If you want to write in a classical style, I'd also recommend Schoenberg 's Fundamentals of Musical Composition. It is a classic.

I know someone who has studied the book and it discusses how pieces are constructed, from the smallest building blocks to a complete work. As far as I understand all pieces consist of a few fundamental units and these are varied upon and developed to create a coherent complete work.

Schoenberg uses the Beethoven piano sonatas extensively to illustrate his argument.

You could also consider enrolling on the Open College of Arts' composition courses. The person that read the Schoenberg book is studying with them and IMHO his compositions have improved greatly. Fantastic improvement, in fact!
“Keep your face to the sun and you will never see the shadows.” Helen Keller

Oliver Newman

Re: Where to start?

Post by Oliver Newman » Thu Jan 23, 2014 1:13 am

lucy wrote:If you want to write in a classical style, I'd also recommend Schoenberg 's Fundamentals of Musical Composition. It is a classic.

I know someone who has studied the book and it discusses how pieces are constructed, from the smallest building blocks to a complete work. As far as I understand all pieces consist of a few fundamental units and these are varied upon and developed to create a coherent complete work.

Schoenberg uses the Beethoven piano sonatas extensively to illustrate his argument.

You could also consider enrolling on the Open College of Arts' composition courses. The person that read the Schoenberg book is studying with them and IMHO his compositions have improved greatly. Fantastic improvement, in fact!
The Schoenberg is a good book, but the language can be quite troublesome. Schoenberg invents his own terminology for things we have since standardised, and his explanations aren't always the clearest. Also, despite its title, it only really focuses on structure, and leaves off voice leading, harmony, etc. That said, it is a great guide to structure.

ekoza

Re: Where to start?

Post by ekoza » Tue Apr 15, 2014 12:57 am

Hi all, I know this discussion has discontinued. The curiosity makes me want to share little of what I know in compositions. Form, counterpoint, harmony...so on are important...but what I didn't see anything about is motive. To compose, what is the first thing that occurs in the mind-a musical idea, usually the melody which becomes the motive (can be splited into 2 or more motives)...I assume everyone who studied has come accross motivic development n how composers use it often in their works.
An example of a simple motive developed to create a famous symphony and is among the most played. I will just give the rhythmic feel n notes used (assuming key of C)of the openin motive- tatatatummm, tatatatummm, (eeec...dddb...)so on. Almost everyone can say which symphony this is n the composer.
Apologies if this HO is too basic that everyone here knows n does not need to be discussed here.
Regards,
Ekoza

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