Ideal Humidity

Construction and repair of Classical Guitar and related instruments
Andre B.

Ideal Humidity

Post by Andre B. » Tue Sep 26, 2006 11:49 pm

What is the ideal humidity to keep your guitar at.

I have a bathroom leading out of my bedroom(where i keep my guitar).
After having a shower my room is usually very humid. Is this bad for my guitar?

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owl
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Post by owl » Wed Sep 27, 2006 12:37 am

In a word YES!... you should try and keep your guitars in as stable an environment as possible.
However sometimes we don't have a choice... keeping it in a hard case will help.

Owl
Never, ever give up!... I leave my songprint on your heart.

Pepe Vergara

Re: Ideal Humidity

Post by Pepe Vergara » Wed Sep 27, 2006 3:30 am

andrebeelders wrote:What is the ideal humidity to keep your guitar at.

I have a bathroom leading out of my bedroom(where i keep my guitar).
After having a shower my room is usually very humid. Is this bad for my guitar?
It depends. If you leave in Arizona, USA, that would be the ideal place to keep it. In certain days of the year, Southern California gets the Santa Ana winds (hot winds from the desert that remove all the humidity brought by teh proximity to the ocean) and relative humidity gets down to almos 8 percent. I run to my bathroom and place the gutiars on the vanity desk, and open the shower for few minutes.
However, as Owl, says, you should procure a stable environment for it.

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chuckinphoenix
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Location: New River, AZ

Post by chuckinphoenix » Wed Sep 27, 2006 3:31 pm

I live in Arizona and have a guitar made in New Mexico. Same dry climate. The luthier told me, and I tend to agree, that a himidifier would not be necessary because the wood was dry when it was built and it is being used in a dry climate.
I also have a Ramirez that I do use a himidifier with because the climate where it was built is much more humid and the wood has moisutre in it. The intent is to keep the environment as close as possible to that of the guitar's birthplace.
That's my 2 cents worth.
Chuck
If you ain't the lead dog the scenery never changes.

Derry

Post by Derry » Sat Sep 30, 2006 10:57 pm

have always heard that 45% RH was the desired level,, of course if the instrument was built and the wood conditioned in 10% RH then that should be the goal if your body can handle it,,

I try to keep our home in the 40 to 55% range through out the year,, if it drops below that due to the windows being open, I place a humidifier in the case with the CG for overnight storage or when I'm not playing,,

dj2066

Post by dj2066 » Tue Oct 03, 2006 6:57 pm

chuckinphoenix wrote:I live in Arizona and have a guitar made in New Mexico. Same dry climate. The luthier told me, and I tend to agree, that a himidifier would not be necessary because the wood was dry when it was built and it is being used in a dry climate.
I also have a Ramirez that I do use a himidifier with because the climate where it was built is much more humid and the wood has moisutre in it. The intent is to keep the environment as close as possible to that of the guitar's birthplace.
That's my 2 cents worth.
Chuck
Good point. I use the same philosophy with my cigar collection.

Doug

Derry

Post by Derry » Tue Oct 03, 2006 11:43 pm

was jsut reading an article about Martin building their guitars,, they try to hold the plants humidity at 45% as well as all the wood to be used in the build,,

after that is is up to us on how we handle them,,

agree if the instrument was built in a dry area and all wood was conditioned the same before building then I would try to hold the RH at the same level,,

Blossom

Post by Blossom » Tue Oct 03, 2006 11:48 pm

Ok, I keep my guitar in a soft case leaning against my bedroom wall. This morning it dawned on me that the wall is actually an outside wall...so I quickly placed it against an inner wall...does it really matter though?

There is always a lot of humidity in the air here at my end of the world :wink:

Blossom

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apollo335
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Post by apollo335 » Wed Oct 04, 2006 1:19 am

The ideal humidity for a wooden instrument is 45%

It is important that the instrument recieves the right amount...read more on an article I found here: http://www.squidoo.com/humidifier/

Don Quichotte

Post by Don Quichotte » Wed Oct 04, 2006 8:09 am

These days, high-quality classical guitars are built in workshops where the relative humidity is maintained at approximately 50%. It is therefore recommended that your guitar be stored at this level. Storing instruments in 40%-70% humidity is generally safe. But anything below 40% can potentially be dangerous.
If relative humidity is lower than 40% there is an increased risk for the fingerboard to shrink so that causing the frets stick out.
Low humidity levels represent more danger than higher humidity levels.
If humidity drops below 30% cracking could occur.
40%-70% humidity is an ideal range.
However, a well constructed instrument should handle reasonable periods of time at 25% and 75% relative humidity without too much strain. Extended periods of exposure below 25% and 75% should be avoided in any case.

Spruce tops (especially older instruments) are more sensible to cracking than cedar tops. (Based on the same construction)
I read somewhere that Brazilian rosewood is also more susceptible to cracking than Indian rosewood. Who knows more???

JimMet

Humidity

Post by JimMet » Fri Oct 06, 2006 2:54 am

I was instructed to keep my guitar in the most humid area possible during the first year. It came with a humidifier, from Paraguay.

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