Different styles of guitar

Construction and repair of Classical Guitar and related instruments
ez

Different styles of guitar

Post by ez » Mon Oct 16, 2006 4:06 am

I've seen photos of many guitars that have been built in the style of Hauser or Ramirez or Fleta but I am not sure what the differences are between them. Is it the body shape or size? Will someone please explain what makes a Hauser different, in terms of construction, from a Ramirez or a Fleta? Thanks in advance.

Sasquatch51

Post by Sasquatch51 » Mon Oct 16, 2006 11:19 am

This is a good question. I'd like to see some comparisons between the different styles of guitar making from someone that builds them.

I know that there are differences in bracing, top wood thickness, neck to body joint, heel and foot block construction, etc., Fletas being built "like tanks", Hausers with lighter construction, Smallman influenced by different makers, Torres and Panormo have a slightly smaller body, etc., etc., but when I hear someone say "This is a '37 Hauser style", or "This is a Torres style", I don't know exactly what's different between that and a "Ramirez style" (and I own a Ramirez), nor do I really understand how it affects the sound...and the sound is the most important thing, right?


It would be interesting to see some sort of authoritative, detailed description of each and practical comparison.

ez

Post by ez » Fri Oct 20, 2006 2:25 pm

nobody?

nyccg

Post by nyccg » Fri Oct 20, 2006 2:55 pm

In addition to differences in construction, I would like to know about differences in sound among these guitars...

Toad

Post by Toad » Sun Oct 22, 2006 12:48 pm

Well I'm not a luthier, but here's my opinion on the different sounds of my guitars:

A 1977 spruce Masuru Kohno. I think Kohno learnt his trade in the Fernandez workshop so I guess it's a Madrid style guitar. The Kohno is physically large and heavy, with a resonant frequency of G. It is loud and sweet with a long sustain and quite a few overtones. Perhaps a little bass shy.

A 2005 spruce Kevin Aram. I gather the plantilla was based on a 37 Hauser and is small, thin bodied and resonates at F#. She has a drier sound, which projects very well with a clear tone, excellent separation of voices, good balance across the register and very deep 'growly' bass. The sustain is less than the Kohno, but she is still just a baby.

A 2006 cedar Jose Plazuello. Jose makes his guitars in the Madrid style and is the nephew of Antonio Marin Montero who studied with Bouchet. The Plazuello is large but lighter than the Kohno and resonates at G. Although a cedar guitar it has good clarity, a very sweet warm colourful treble and good bass with lots of overtones. The sustain is not bad at all.

I find myself using particular guitars for different styles of music.

The Aram sounds great with Bach and most other music, but the Kohno and Plazuello come into their own with Spanish style music.

A great site with MP3's for comparing the sounds of different guitars can be found at zavaletas-guitarras.com/files/gallery.htm

Phill

Allan

Post by Allan » Mon Oct 23, 2006 12:31 am

One of the most entertaining and informative books you can get on classical guitars is called "The Classical Guitar, A Complete History Featuring the Russell Cleveland Collection". It was printed a few years ago in a limited edition of 6,000 copies, but if you can get your hands on one it's worth it. There are plenty of photos, drawings, essays and bios on the luthiers and their intstruments in 20th century classical guitar. The book is a delight to read, and the best single-book education on the classical guitar that I know of.

Allan

ez

Post by ez » Mon Oct 23, 2006 1:35 am

Allan wrote:One of the most entertaining and informative books you can get on classical guitars is called "The Classical Guitar, A Complete History Featuring the Russell Cleveland Collection". It was printed a few years ago in a limited edition of 6,000 copies, but if you can get your hands on one it's worth it. There are plenty of photos, drawings, essays and bios on the luthiers and their intstruments in 20th century classical guitar. The book is a delight to read, and the best single-book education on the classical guitar that I know of.

Allan
Thanks for the recommendation. I'll track one down.

Sasquatch51

Post by Sasquatch51 » Mon Oct 23, 2006 1:36 am

I also found 3 more intersting books...I ordered all 3 from Amazon:

1. The Concise History of the Classic Guitar by Graham Wade

2. The Art and Craft of Making Classical Guitars by Manuel Rodriguez

3. The Classical Guitar, A Complete History by John Morrish


Holy smokes! I didn't even put a link in there and it says "boycotted link"....what if was talking about the River in South America?

Sasquatch51

Post by Sasquatch51 » Tue Oct 24, 2006 12:28 pm

Well, I ordered the books on Friday, they arrived yesterday...fast!

Anyway, The Classical Guitar, A Complete History by John Morrish turns out to actually be the one featuring Russel Cleveland's collection. It is available through that boycotted link that has the same name as the big river in South America.

MarkJ

Post by MarkJ » Mon Oct 30, 2006 1:04 am

Also good is Courtnalls "Making Master Guitars". It has scale drawings and specs for many fine instruments - it well illustrates the differences between the the various makers.

Azalais

Post by Azalais » Mon Oct 30, 2006 2:21 am

Here's a great website that has sound samples so you can hear the differences:
http://www.zavaletas-guitarras.com/files/gallery.htm

ez

Post by ez » Tue Oct 31, 2006 12:48 am

Thanks for the link Azalais. That will keep me busy for a while.

wianno

Post by wianno » Tue Oct 31, 2006 6:39 pm

You can learn a good deal about guitar design and construction from William Cumpiano at his web site <www.cumpiano.com> and from his excellent book on guitar construction.

By the way, his piece on his site about relief (string height) and its adjustment is definitive.

Jack

cjdlx

Post by cjdlx » Sun Nov 12, 2006 9:24 am

ptadman wrote:Well I'm not a luthier, but here's my opinion on the different sounds of my guitars:

A 1977 spruce Masuru Kohno. I think Kohno learnt his trade in the Fernandez workshop so I guess it's a Madrid style guitar. The Kohno is physically large and heavy, with a resonant frequency of G. It is loud and sweet with a long sustain and quite a few overtones. Perhaps a little bass shy.

A 2005 spruce Kevin Aram. I gather the plantilla was based on a 37 Hauser and is small, thin bodied and resonates at F#. She has a drier sound, which projects very well with a clear tone, excellent separation of voices, good balance across the register and very deep 'growly' bass. The sustain is less than the Kohno, but she is still just a baby.

A 2006 cedar Jose Plazuello. Jose makes his guitars in the Madrid style and is the nephew of Antonio Marin Montero who studied with Bouchet. The Plazuello is large but lighter than the Kohno and resonates at G. Although a cedar guitar it has good clarity, a very sweet warm colourful treble and good bass with lots of overtones. The sustain is not bad at all.

I find myself using particular guitars for different styles of music.

The Aram sounds great with Bach and most other music, but the Kohno and Plazuello come into their own with Spanish style music.

A great site with MP3's for comparing the sounds of different guitars can be found at zavaletas-guitarras.com/files/gallery.htm

Phill

cjdlx

Post by cjdlx » Sun Nov 12, 2006 9:24 am

ptadman wrote:Well I'm not a luthier, but here's my opinion on the different sounds of my guitars:

A 1977 spruce Masuru Kohno. I think Kohno learnt his trade in the Fernandez workshop so I guess it's a Madrid style guitar. The Kohno is physically large and heavy, with a resonant frequency of G. It is loud and sweet with a long sustain and quite a few overtones. Perhaps a little bass shy.

A 2005 spruce Kevin Aram. I gather the plantilla was based on a 37 Hauser and is small, thin bodied and resonates at F#. She has a drier sound, which projects very well with a clear tone, excellent separation of voices, good balance across the register and very deep 'growly' bass. The sustain is less than the Kohno, but she is still just a baby.

A 2006 cedar Jose Plazuello. Jose makes his guitars in the Madrid style and is the nephew of Antonio Marin Montero who studied with Bouchet. The Plazuello is large but lighter than the Kohno and resonates at G. Although a cedar guitar it has good clarity, a very sweet warm colourful treble and good bass with lots of overtones. The sustain is not bad at all.

I find myself using particular guitars for different styles of music.

The Aram sounds great with Bach and most other music, but the Kohno and Plazuello come into their own with Spanish style music.

A great site with MP3's for comparing the sounds of different guitars can be found at zavaletas-guitarras.com/files/gallery.htm

Phill

Return to “Luthiers”