Admira Guitars

Construction and repair of Classical Guitar and related instruments
andylefty

Post by andylefty » Sat Sep 30, 2006 8:20 pm

I'm trying to decide between a yamaha and an admira...

pros for Yamaha i like the look of it and it looks better made

pros for Admira it is really Spanish made


:?:

User avatar
Jedaks
Posts: 393
Joined: Thu Sep 07, 2006 5:22 am
Location: Australia

Post by Jedaks » Mon Oct 02, 2006 3:54 am

Yamaha and Admira are both good instruments. If you feel the Yamaha is a better made and sounding guitar then choose that one. Don't buy an Admira just because it is made in Spain. That is like thinking you cannot get good Mexican food outside of Mexico or good beer outside of Germany.

Either guitar is decent. Admira and Yamaha don't make a bad guitar. Buy the best sounding and best playing guitar that you can afford and you will never regret it.

guitarstudent

Post by guitarstudent » Mon Oct 02, 2006 10:00 am

Buy the best guitar you can afford, or even stretch to one a bit more. It may suit you now, but you will outgrow it depending on your progress and how quickly your ear develops. I am searching for an upgrade, and I am consigned to the fact that I have to spend > £1000, however, I did try a very good admira Alicia which was used, and played in. Sounded much better than my guitar, but was not what I was looking for. Also the Admira Theresa was not bad. The best Admira for a beginner is the Virtuoso or the Soledad, or perhaps the Avila or Arista. The Virtusos is the cheapest with rosewood back and sides, the others have ebony fingerboards (another plus which raises the price). Do not bother unless it has solid top and (laminated or solid, depending on your budget) rosewood back and sides (I had a solista and was fed up after 3 weeks and traded for Virtuoso). I have tried Yamahas and Admiras, and there was not much in it, they have their pros and cons. I found the Yamahas better balanced but rather boxy tone. The Admiras sound sweeter but the trebles let them down. Plus, if you have small hands, their necks need a bit more work to develop your left hand. If you get an Admira, take it to a luthier (or maybe the shop can do it, they should do), set the action to around 3.2 to 3.5 mm on the bass side, 2.7 to 3mm on the trebles at the 12th fret, then use D'Adario hard tension (in my experience they work best on Admira guitars, but you could try Savarez red card), they bring out the trebles, add depth to the vioce, and the low action means it still feels like normal tension strings!

Most importantly play as many as you can, don't buy straight away, keep coming back to try again, try as many as you can, and then decide which has the best balance of sound and ease to play.
:P

I disagree about Admira not making a bad guitar. I have played 2 bad ones, that should not have been seen a customer with the set up that they had. I have seen one so bad, with the action >5mm on the bass side at the 12th fret and 2mm at the nut, but nothing left in the saddle to take it down. As a result it was unplayable guitar, impossible to fret in the 1st position and totally out of tune past the 5th fret. Firewood.

User avatar
Jedaks
Posts: 393
Joined: Thu Sep 07, 2006 5:22 am
Location: Australia

Post by Jedaks » Tue Oct 03, 2006 10:11 am

Well, I suppose any company will have a lemon slip out of the factory.
I don't have an Admira and wouldnt buy one in favour of other makes, but I would not be ashamed or afraid to buy an Admira if it was all that was available.

andylefty

Post by andylefty » Tue Oct 03, 2006 1:11 pm

Jedaks wrote:Yamaha and Admira are both good instruments. If you feel the Yamaha is a better made and sounding guitar then choose that one. Don't buy an Admira just because it is made in Spain. That is like thinking you cannot get good Mexican food outside of Mexico or good beer outside of Germany.

Either guitar is decent. Admira and Yamaha don't make a bad guitar. Buy the best sounding and best playing guitar that you can afford and you will never regret it.

:) thanks!

Return to “Luthiers”