D05 Classical guitar lesson 08

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Jean-François Delcamp
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D05 Classical guitar lesson 08

Post by Jean-François Delcamp » Tue Apr 03, 2018 8:52 am

Hello everyone,
Please start by downloading the latest version of volume D05.
If you are new to the course, please read this message to familiarize yourself with the conditions for participating in the lessons. You should also read the first message in lesson 1, where you will find advice on how to make the most of your study time and on the methods of practising that I recommend.





Now we're going to work on a study:
- pages 154, 155 Francisco Tàrrega (1852-1909) Estudio en mi mayor
In the company of Tàrrega, we're going to pay a visit to fret XIX and play a top B, in bar 29. To reach this part of the fingerboard more easily you can raise your guitar up by adjusting your guitar support or your footstool to its maximum height. The path of the thumb under the neck is as follows:
1) The thumb starts off beneath the third string, opposite the middle or ring finger.
2) Then, the more the hand is moved towards the soundhole, the closer the thumb gets to the first string.
3) Finally, as you move towards the highest notes, the thumb is placed on the edge of the fingerboard, as I show you in the following short videos.






Today we'll look at 4 pieces.

- page 47 Johann Sebastian Bach (1685-1750) Prelude BWV 1007
The first 4 bars establish the key. They present in succession D major, G major (with a D bass), A major 7th (with a D bass), and D major. That is to say, a succession of the tonic, subdominant, dominant and tonic. The tension increases from bar 1 to bar 3, reaching its maximum in bar 3, because of the presence of the dissonant interval D-C#. This increasing tension may be expressed with a crescendo. The tension disappears in bar 4, with the resolution of the dissonant interval by means of a fully consonant octave interval, D-D. We then have various modulations, into A major from bar 5 (G#), E minor in bar 11, B minor in bar 13, and G major in bar 16. From bar 23 there are many scale passages and we notice the presence, in the bass notes, of a pedal note on the A (the dominant), which eventually resolves into a perfect cadence in the very last bar of the prelude. This adaptation for guitar, like many others of this suite, is in D major, a key which offers the advantage that the tonic (D) and dominant (A) correspond to two of the bass strings of the guitar. The few bass notes that I have added are in brackets.




- page 54 Niccolò Paganini (1782-1840) Sonata n°4
This short sonata, written with admirable effectiveness, includes a rondo which is light and full of zest. Note the presence of the Alberti bass (bars 5, 6, 7, 10, 11, 20, 21, 22, 23, 48 and 50) which consists in arpeggiating the chords of the accompaniment starting with the root note, followed by the fifth, the third and then the fifth again. This Alberti bass was used particularly during the classical period (Fernando Sor, Mauro Giuliani). The rhythm of the melody is written without specifying the exact lengths of the notes. For instance, in bar 5 the melody consists of the notes played on strings 1 and 2, which, in my opinion, should sound like this: D dotted quarter note (dotted crotchet), F, E, D quarter notes (crotchets). Similarly in bars 6, 7, 10, 11, 20, 21, 22 and 23. Many composers of the classical period, for example Carulli, frequently notate music in this way, without giving the exact length of the notes of each of the voices making up the polyphony. This simplification of the writing saved space on the paper and made the engraver's work easier.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alberti_bass




- page 112 Zequinha de Abreu (1880-1935) Amando sobre o mar
This slow waltz from the Brazilian composer Zequinha de Abreu is made up of a melody with an extended range of pitch: from the middle D# (bar 57) to the top A (bar 11). The accompaniment should be played subtly and softly, so as to support the melody without ever drowning it out.




Julio Sagreras (1879-1942) Leccione III n°4
Here is an excellent and beautiful tremolo study. Sagreras invites us to begin by using the simplest fingering: pimi, then a more complex one: piai. Once we've mastered these fingerings, we'll go on to use the king of fingerings for tremolo: pami. Evenness of the sound and regularity of the repeated notes are essential in order to give the melody its continuity. Slow practice, together with a search for perfection in the detail, is necessary to obtain this regularity. Every note is important.




I ask you first to work on all these exercises and tunes for a week and then to upload your recordings of:
- page 47 Johann Sebastian Bach (1685-1750) Prelude BWV 1007
- pages 154, 155 Francisco Tàrrega (1852-1909) Estudio en mi mayor




Good luck!


I thank Geoff (GeoffB) who has helped in the translation of my lessons into English.


Jean-François


Exam qualifying submissions:
Johann Sebastian Bach (1685-1750) Prelude BWV 1007
Francisco Tàrrega (1852-1909) Estudio en mi mayor

Jeffrey Chan
Francisco Tàrrega (1852-1909) Estudio en mi mayor

Maria Anisimova
Johann Sebastian Bach (1685-1750) Prelude BWV 1007
:( + ♫ = :)

Maria Anisimova
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Re: D05 Classical guitar lesson 08

Post by Maria Anisimova » Fri Apr 06, 2018 9:09 am

Just WOW!!! So much more difficult than the previous lesson. My left hand simply refuses to perform the required motions. Not to mention moving both hands in synch...
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Jeffrey Chan
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Re: D05 Classical guitar lesson 08

Post by Jeffrey Chan » Fri Apr 06, 2018 2:18 pm

Yes, this is going to be a challenging month!

I've played Bach 1007 before, but the Duarte arrangement. This month will be a good time to compare the fingerings and make some revisions. I noticed that the Delcamp version makes more use of open strings and lower positions.

The Tarrega piece has some great scale based patterns in it, i've been using it for more a warm-up piece.

Btw, the other piece that I'm working is from Alan Thomas ( Out of Africa ): http://www.alanthomas-guitar.com/africa.html I'm starting with the second movement - Morning Dance. There's also a great video of Dennis Azagabic playing this: Search Youtube for "Denis Azabagić plays 'Out of Africa' by Alan Thomas"

Moderator note: No direct links to copyrighted music, please.
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Re: D05 Classical guitar lesson 08

Post by Jeffrey Chan » Thu Apr 19, 2018 5:54 am

My submission for Bach Prelude 1007



And Estudio en mi mayor

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Re: D05 Classical guitar lesson 08

Post by John Montes » Fri Apr 20, 2018 10:58 pm

Jeffrey Chan wrote:
Thu Apr 19, 2018 5:54 am
My submission for Bach Prelude 1007
And Estudio en mi mayor
Nice progress Jeff.

We can give credit for the Tarrega piece, but the Bach Prelude is from a different transcription in low D-tuning and varying differences in voicings and bass lines compared to the D05 workbook transcription.

If you have time to learn and submit the Delcamp transcription, we can give credit.
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Re: D05 Classical guitar lesson 08

Post by Maria Anisimova » Sun Apr 22, 2018 1:43 pm

Jeffrey Chan wrote:
Thu Apr 19, 2018 5:54 am
My submission for Bach Prelude 1007
And Estudio en mi mayor
Great job with Bach! It might be a different transcription but the Prelude is played nicely all the same. As for me, I am still struggling with the text. It is probably the most difficult piece in the entire D05 course.
As for Estudio I think you need to work on the text a bit more and probably increase the tempo a bit. After all it is a study, so probably some fluency is required.
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Maria Anisimova
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Re: D05 Classical guitar lesson 08

Post by Maria Anisimova » Mon Apr 30, 2018 12:25 pm

Bach Prelude BWV 1007

(sorry for the awkward camera position, I noticed it only later and did not have the courage to redo my best take)

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Jeffrey Chan
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Re: D05 Classical guitar lesson 08

Post by Jeffrey Chan » Fri May 04, 2018 3:37 pm

Hi Maria..

Excellent job. This is a tough piece to learn in a month and you did a great job. One comment would be to think about phrasing more, to connect the notes into sentences, so to speak. Its interesting to see Delcamp's arrangement in so many lower positions, I'd be interested to hear your thoughts on that.
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Re: D05 Classical guitar lesson 08

Post by Maria Anisimova » Sat Jun 02, 2018 1:34 pm

Here is my very late submission of Francisco Tarrega. Estudio en mi mayor. The piece seems just beyond my abilities. I don't feel I can do any better at present. It's the problem of my overall level, I guess.

[anchor=][/anchor]
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Rick Beauregard
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Re: D05 Classical guitar lesson 08

Post by Rick Beauregard » Sat Jun 02, 2018 5:44 pm

One of my favorite scale studies. I practice this now instead of boring scales. I think you are too hard on yourself Maria. This is not at all beyond your abilities. Just slow it down a tad until you can play it confidently. Then speed it up slowly never playing any faster than you can execute cleanly. I like to keep notes on % of recommended tempo and # of faults to track my improvement over time. If you do that you’ll be amazed at how you improve incrementally.
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Re: D05 Classical guitar lesson 08

Post by Maria Anisimova » Sun Jun 03, 2018 8:37 am

Rick Beauregard wrote:
Sat Jun 02, 2018 5:44 pm
One of my favorite scale studies. I practice this now instead of boring scales. I think you are too hard on yourself Maria. This is not at all beyond your abilities. Just slow it down a tad until you can play it confidently. Then speed it up slowly never playing any faster than you can execute cleanly. I like to keep notes on % of recommended tempo and # of faults to track my improvement over time. If you do that you’ll be amazed at how you improve incrementally.
Thank you for the encouraging words. I'll definitely try to follow your advice as I am out of ideas anyway.
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Re: D05 Classical guitar lesson 08

Post by DaveMoutrie » Tue Jun 05, 2018 9:53 am

Maria Anisimova wrote:
Sun Jun 03, 2018 8:37 am
Rick Beauregard wrote:
Sat Jun 02, 2018 5:44 pm
One of my favorite scale studies. I practice this now instead of boring scales. I think you are too hard on yourself Maria. This is not at all beyond your abilities. Just slow it down a tad until you can play it confidently. Then speed it up slowly never playing any faster than you can execute cleanly. I like to keep notes on % of recommended tempo and # of faults to track my improvement over time. If you do that you’ll be amazed at how you improve incrementally.
Thank you for the encouraging words. I'll definitely try to follow your advice as I am out of ideas anyway.
Sounds pretty amazing to me - you have made some fantastic progress on D05 and I totally agree with Rick - it certainly is not outside your abilities. Just the odd pause here and there which could easily be rectified by slowing it down a bit.

One technique I have been using is to slow a piece right down and using the metronome, gradually increase the speed till I find the best speed I can play without making too many pauses or mistakes.

Keep up the good work Maria, you're doing great.

:bravo:
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Re: D05 Classical guitar lesson 08

Post by John Montes » Wed Jun 06, 2018 12:24 am

Hi Maria,

Rick and Dave have both made great recommendations.
Definitely practice this study at a slow deliberate pace in order to play perfectly, then increase speed later.

This study has a little bit of many things, right hand finger alternation, scale runs, bass lines and accompaniment, damping, position shifts up and down the fretboard.
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