D02 Classical guitar lesson 1

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Jean-François Delcamp
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D02 Classical guitar lesson 1

Post by Jean-François Delcamp » Tue Nov 09, 2010 6:43 am

Hello everyone,
We are going to talk about the minimum time you need to devote to the study of the guitar, about the position for holding the guitar, and finally about some techniques, exercises and pieces.

Timetable for players of a year's experience:
In order to progress, you need a little time each day for 6 days of the week. Here is the minimum necessary for players of this level :
3 days when you can devote 15 minutes to repeating each difficult passage 6 to 12 times. I'll indicate these difficult passages to you by highlighting them in yellow.
and
3 days when you can devote 40 minutes to studying the guitar, made up of
- 15 minutes practicing the difficult passages (highlighted in yellow),
- 15 minutes repeating the individual phrases (indicated by phrase marks) several times in succession (3 to 6 times)
- and finally 10 minutes playing the piece or pieces in full.

Note that you must play for 6 days of the week. If you combine all this time into one day, that is to say, 2 hours in a single day, you will not make progress and furthermore you will risk injuring yourself by making demands on certain muscles for too long. Divide up your practice and play a little each day.

Spend most of your practice time on the parts you have trouble playing: difficult passages, difficult phrases. Only play pieces the whole way through once or twice a week.
So we understand one another properly, here is an example of a timetable where sessions alternate between 15 and 40 minutes:
Monday 40 minutes
Tuesday 15 minutes
Wednesday 40 minutes
Thursday 15 minutes
Friday 40 minutes
Saturday 15 minutes



The position for the classical guitar is the product of past experience. The classical position enables us to reduce effort to a minimum, and has arisen from a compromise between the needs for stability, comfort and the efficient use of both hands.

The principles of this position are:
sitting position, back straight, shoulders level,
the guitar rests on whichever thigh is on the neck side.
We raise the head of the guitar level with our head, with the aid of a footstool or of a support placed on the thigh.
The hand which plays the strings is placed over the sound hole, the elbow rests on the edge of the body of the guitar, level with the bridge.
The arm on the neck side is bent to bring the hand up to the height of the shoulder, the thumb is placed behind the neck, beneath the second fret and behind the third string, the fingers are over the strings.
Try to achieve relaxation, from the shoulders right down to the hands.
Finally, choose a chair of a height that allows your thights to be horizontal, like this your guitar will rest in a stable manner. If your thigh is angled in one direction or the other, your guitar will slip and interfere with your playing.

To begin the course we will firstly look at, or relook at, pages 26 and 58 of volume D01.
- page 26 of volume D01 : Jean-François DELCAMP (1956) POLYPHONIE
- page 58 of volume D01 : Jean-François DELCAMP (1956) REST STROKE - APOYANDO
These exercises will work upon the technique of simultaneous rest strokes (apoyando) with the thumb and index finger, and also with the thumb and middle finger.
The rest stoke is a way to play the string with a finger movement which plucks the string and then continues to move until it comes to rest on the adjacent string. The work on this technique will allow you to discover the best position for your plucking hand (the right hand if you are right-handed).
If you are already used to plucking the strings with free strokes, the simultaneous rest strokes with the thumb and a finger will seem difficult to you, even impossible. But be assured, with patience and consistence, this difficulty will be resolved in 30 minutes. I know from experience that the first tries are truly discouraging, particularly for adults. It is for this reason that I wish to reassure you in advance, take heart, you will be able to do it.


D01 p26 n1 - Delcamp Polyphonie


D01 p26 n2 - Delcamp Polyphonie


D01 p58 n15 Buté - Apoyando - Rest stroke


D01 p58 n16 Buté - Apoyando - Rest stroke





Then we will study three pieces, the easiest of volume D02. These three pieces are to be played either with rest stroke or free stroke, both for the melody and for the bass.
- page 6 ANONYME (1750) DANSE D'AVILA with rest strokes (apoyando).
- page 8 Stephen Collins FOSTER (1826-1864) OH! SUSANNA with rest strokes (apoyando). This piece will serve to work on rhythm. To keep time, count out loud the beats as indicated above the stave.
- page 19 ANONYME (1750) QUE NE SUIS-JE LA FOUGÈRE with free strokes (tirando),



D02 p6 - Anonyme - Danse d'Avila


D02 p8 – Stephen Collins FOSTER (1826-1864) – Oh Susanna


D02 p19 – Anonyme - Que ne suis-je la fougère



I ask you first to work on all these exercises and pieces for one week and then to post your recordings on the forum for:
- page 26 du volume D01 : Jean-François DELCAMP (1956) POLYPHONIE
- page 6 ANONYME (1750) DANSE D'AVILA en butant (apoyando).
- page 8 Stephen Collins FOSTER (1826-1864) OH! SUSANNA en butant (apoyando).


Jean-François
:( + ♫ = :)

Gregory Martell

Re: D02 - Lesson 1

Post by Gregory Martell » Wed Nov 10, 2010 3:54 am

Hello - A question regarding Anonyme-Danse d'Avila and the pima fingering. The copy I am working from has recommended fingering. Is this the fingering Mr Delcamp is using. I am probably mistaken :oops: but he seems to be doing something different. There seems to be more index middle use than suggested. I can't quite see from the video.

Also, the use of the damping symbol as suggested on page 4 has it linked to the preceding note with a line. In most of the D01 book there is a line drawn back from the damp symbol to the preceding note. However, in this piece and in fact most of the D02 book this line is absent. Am I to assume that the line is meant to be there or is there a different consideration?

Keeping with the damping theme, how is the 1st note in measure 8 meant to be stopped from ringing?

Best Regards. Greg.

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SteveT
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Re: D02 - Lesson 1

Post by SteveT » Wed Nov 10, 2010 5:27 am

Regarding the Polyphonie (D01 p.26) and Apoyando (D01 p.58) exercises - as Mr. Delcamp pointed out, for those of us who have been playing for some time, already accustomed to certain rest / free stroke hand positions, these exercises will force proper technique, and lead to correct hand position.

Some observations from watching the videos closely and attempting the exercises til I could do them myself:

1. The right hand is required to be in the proper position with the knuckles closer to parallel to the strings; the more diagonal the knuckles to the string, the more difficult to execute the rest strokes because of the angle of attack of he fingertip.

2. The right hand is required to be an appropriate distance from the strings to allow for full, straight finger extension in order for the rest strokes to be executed correctly - i.e. the primary motion comes from the large knuckle where the finger joins the hand, allowing the finger tip remain extended during and after the string is plucked. Any hint of "claw hand" or curved fingers simply will not work.

3. The rest strokes require extension, for both the fingers and the thumb, in order to correctly strike the string with the flesh of the fingertip first - in other words, it is next to impossible to play a rest stroke with both P and either I or M at the same time if any of them are already resting on the string. From what I can tell (others please correct if I am going down the wrong path here) it is necessary to execute these rest strokes starting with the finger extended beyond the string to be played, allowing for a strike "through" the string, so to speak.

4. Nail length and shape will play heavily into success or failure of these rest strokes - shorter nails seem like they would work better, but it could be just sloppy technique on my part.

I would appreciate any thoughts that others might have...

Steve T. :cafeine:
"DO or DO NOT; there is no TRY"
~~Yoda (as quoted by Scott Tennant)

Esteve Manuel Adalid 9 C/B

HugoHJ

Re: D02 - Lesson 1

Post by HugoHJ » Wed Nov 10, 2010 10:17 am

Gregory Martell wrote:A question regarding Anonyme-Danse d'Avila and the pima fingering. The copy I am working from has recommended fingering. Is this the fingering Mr Delcamp is using. I am probably mistaken :oops: but he seems to be doing something different. There seems to be more index middle use than suggested. I can't quite see from the video.
I think that there was a recent change in the scores at volume 2. In the new score (the one with yellow highlights) the fingering is i-m-i-m. In the previous version the fingering was i-m-a-i-m-a.

Richard Judge

Re: D02 - Lesson 1

Post by Richard Judge » Thu Nov 11, 2010 9:17 am

I am having problems keeping my right hand steady over the strings.
My i finger is much shorter than my m and so I feel the need to rotate my hand so that theleft side ov the fingers is contacting the string. If I dont do this my hand has to move up and down to account for the differing finger lengths. It is also making it difficult for my thumb to reach the strings when my fingers are uncurled. This is particularily a problem when the fingers are plaing string one with the thumb on string 3.

Jeremy Hickerson
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Re: D02 - Lesson 1

Post by Jeremy Hickerson » Thu Nov 11, 2010 7:54 pm

This is to Steve, about executing the thumb and i or m rest stroke when you already are resting both thumb and finger on the string about to be played. I don't know if it's correct or not, but I do this. I have the i or m on the string to be played with the pad touching the string and the nail engaged and ready to play. For the thumb the pad is touch and the nail isn't quite engaged. The force of the finger stroke is more down towards the top of the guitar than back towards the next string. The finger executing the rest stroke is slightly curved at the joints, I think this just gives it greater stiffness and gives you better leverage for executing the stroke than if the finger was totally straight and the joints locked.
Jeremy

Guitarras: 1973 Manouk Papazian (Spruce/Morado), two I have built, and an old Telesforo Julve parlor size

GrahamK

Re: D02 - Lesson 1

Post by GrahamK » Thu Nov 11, 2010 8:34 pm

Hi, I must say after playing for some time now, I am having difficulty playing the rest stroke p+i (p+m) at the same time.

In the past I have always played either of the notes with a slight delay inbetween them (now I know why!). So I'm having to go back to the begining and start again to learn proper technique.

Back to the drawing board. :(

All good fun!

Graham.

Jeremy Hickerson
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Re: D02 - Lesson 1

Post by Jeremy Hickerson » Thu Nov 11, 2010 9:32 pm

On playing p and i or m (or a) at the same time on a rest stroke, I have had luck with initiating the finger stroke first (just slightly before) and then playing the thumb right at the moment when the finger stroke is going to sound. This accounts for the small delay to make the rest stroke "speak".
Jeremy

Guitarras: 1973 Manouk Papazian (Spruce/Morado), two I have built, and an old Telesforo Julve parlor size

RyanDG

Re: D02 - Lesson 1

Post by RyanDG » Thu Nov 11, 2010 10:07 pm

Sorry mispost, I didn't pay close attention to the video's :P
Last edited by RyanDG on Fri Nov 12, 2010 11:10 am, edited 1 time in total.

QadirASabur

Re: D02 - Lesson 1

Post by QadirASabur » Thu Nov 11, 2010 10:49 pm

GrahamK wrote:Hi, I must say after playing for some time now, I am having difficulty playing the rest stroke p+i (p+m) at the same time.

In the past I have always played either of the notes with a slight delay inbetween them (now I know why!). So I'm having to go back to the begining and start again to learn proper technique.

Back to the drawing board. :(

All good fun!

Graham.
Me too Graham--but after difficulty comes ease.

Gregory Martell

Re: D02 - Lesson 1

Post by Gregory Martell » Thu Nov 11, 2010 11:03 pm

HugoHJ wrote:
Gregory Martell wrote:A question regarding Anonyme-Danse d'Avila and the pima fingering. The copy I am working from has recommended fingering. Is this the fingering Mr Delcamp is using. I am probably mistaken :oops: but he seems to be doing something different. There seems to be more index middle use than suggested. I can't quite see from the video.
I think that there was a recent change in the scores at volume 2. In the new score (the one with yellow highlights) the fingering is i-m-i-m. In the previous version the fingering was i-m-a-i-m-a.
Thanks for that... I see where I went wrong.

Cheers
Greg

GrahamK

Re: D02 - Lesson 1

Post by GrahamK » Thu Nov 11, 2010 11:09 pm

Hi, I've just realized aswell that I haven't even been playing rest strokes with my thumb atall. Thats why I don't have much bass!

It feals like I'm having to move my hand position that much now that my i,m,a rest strokes sound a bit rough.

Normally, my wrist and hand are quite straight but now I am having to bend my wrist to the right which feels uncomfortable. Is this normal?

Graham.

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SteveT
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Re: D02 - Lesson 1

Post by SteveT » Fri Nov 12, 2010 1:54 am

Jeremy Hickerson wrote:This is to Steve, about executing the thumb and i or m rest stroke when you already are resting both thumb and finger on the string about to be played. I don't know if it's correct or not, but I do this. I have the i or m on the string to be played with the pad touching the string and the nail engaged and ready to play. For the thumb the pad is touch and the nail isn't quite engaged. The force of the finger stroke is more down towards the top of the guitar than back towards the next string. The finger executing the rest stroke is slightly curved at the joints, I think this just gives it greater stiffness and gives you better leverage for executing the stroke than if the finger was totally straight and the joints locked.
Hi Jeremy,

I think my problem is that my nails might be too long (and they are not that long) because I when I attempt to play the rest stroke with my finger already on the string as you have described, I get a LOT of nail drag. It seems that attempting the stroke from having the finger off the string forces me to hit the flesh tip providing more ramp for the nail, and less drag. I think I can adjust to get the same effect from starting on the string, with some practice - and slightly shorter nails. (#4 from my original post)

I agree with a slightly curved finger for the rest stroke verses a totally straight finger - but I do think that for the rest stroke, the finger is straighter from the middle knuckle to the tip than it would be for a free stroke, allowing the finger to play "through" the string to the resting position on the next string... does this make sense?

Steve T :cafeine:
"DO or DO NOT; there is no TRY"
~~Yoda (as quoted by Scott Tennant)

Esteve Manuel Adalid 9 C/B

Peter Johnson

Re: D02 - Lesson 1

Post by Peter Johnson » Fri Nov 12, 2010 1:24 pm

I don't think I have ever played a rest stroke with the p. This is a most interesting start to the course, or where I am starting at D02.
The only time I play apoyando is for scales as requested in the Trinity exam syllabus and that is only with ima.
Not easy playing p and i or m or a at the same time, I mean exactly at the same time. Even more so when only one string separates like when using the 1st and 3rd strings.

Joseph Albert

Re: D02 - Lesson 1

Post by Joseph Albert » Fri Nov 12, 2010 1:57 pm

To begin the course we will firstly look at, or relook at, pages 26 and 58 of volume D01.
- page 26 of volume D01 : Jean-François DELCAMP (1956) POLYPHONIE
- page 58 of volume D01 : Jean-François DELCAMP (1956) REST STROKE - APOYANDO
This was a pretty good start. Like you said, it seemed almost impossible at first, but with a little adjustment of my right hand (a slight tilt of the knuckles toward my body) , it became relatively easy and now both my rest stroke and free stroke sound much better from the new position.

I agree with Peter, the most difficult is when only one string separates the p and i or p and m. I have to be very delicate or my fat fingers just mute both strings.

JA

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