D01 Classical guitar lesson 1

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PDF, MP3, Vidéos, Lessons : Level D01 - Level D02 - Level D03 - Level D04 - Level D05 - Level D06 - Level D07 - Level D08 - Level D09 - Level D10 - Level D11 - Level D12.
DarrenV

Re: D01 - Lesson 1

Post by DarrenV » Sun Nov 14, 2010 1:48 am

Mr. Delcamp, Thanks for the encouragement and for your teaching. Darren

SusanGRas

Re: D01 - Lesson 1

Post by SusanGRas » Sun Nov 14, 2010 3:03 am

Thanks Darren. I see Mr. Delcamp's version is a bit faster but a good friend told me not to worry about speed, that it would come. The same friend sold me this beautiful guitar. It is a Hill Torres and one of the very few guitars that was small enough to actually feel like it fit my smaller stature. It took me quite a while to figure out the whole youtube and recording thing but I know how now so next time I can spend more time on the actual pieces!

Chris NewVillage

Re: D01 - Lesson 1

Post by Chris NewVillage » Sun Nov 14, 2010 8:04 am

Chris NewVillage wrote:FYI: The D01 delcamp_volume1.pdf I downloaded from "Collection of scores for guitar - levels D01 to D03" don't show the damping marks you showed. Is that the correct download? Or, is there another location to check?
Oops. After reflection, I think I'm just reading my version the notes incorrectly. I mean, they are quarter notes, after all. I believe Mr. Delcamp is being the kind teacher and pointing out my mistake :desole:

pmb379

Re: D01 - Lesson 1

Post by pmb379 » Sun Nov 14, 2010 10:34 am

Hello Darren,

> Is my video viewable now? <

Yes. Nice quality of tone, I think.

> I noticed that my right wrist is rather high and angled to the right (ie towards the back of the instrument). I was comparing this position with a few professional guitarists on YT and noticed many of their wrists are flatter and that the forearm and hand are more in line, except for folks like Parkening who has more of the angled back wrist. <

Mind you, I am not a teacher, just someone who is coming back to the guitar after not quite 30 years of pause. So, with that in mind ...

Back when I was learning properly, with a teacher and everything, we were taught to hold the right hand as you do in your video. I believe it's called the "Tarrega hand". It makes the line of knuckles parallel with the strings. It's not a comfortable posture of the hand, but effective for playing. It also doesn't seem to me as if it is consistent with modern ways to file the finger nails with a ramp. Nails tend to hook badly with ramped, long nails on a Tarrega hand.

For that, I found the much more relaxed posture of the right hand, with the hand and the lower arm more (but not quite) in a line is better. A bit towards the posture you would use on a lute.

Me, I can see theoretically how the more relaxed posture would be gentler on my wrist, but I have been trained for 12 years to do it as I see it in your video. I just can't retrain, not with the time and effort that I am able to spend on this.

So I file my nails as I was taught to do (basically following the line of the finger tip), use my old guitar, use old-fashioned nylon strings and do as I was taught, and what my bones still know.

I suspect though, that for someone who starts completely new, it might be worthwhile to learn the more modern, relaxed way of playing.

> Might anyone have suggestions of how to rememdy this? <

If you want to remedy it at all (see above), then I suspect the only way would be to retrain your muscle memory completely for a long time. I think, that because you learned 20 years ago, in a similar time frame as I did, you might have been trained to the Tarrega hand, too.

I, in your place, probably wouldn't. Especially since your tone, to me, sounds quite good as it is.

- As I said, that's my way of seeing it. Might well be wrong. I shall be on the look-out for correction ...

Regards,
Peer

Added later:
look at Susan's (hello Susan!) right hand. That's the more relaxed, possibly more modern posture, that I was talking about. Produces also a good, clean tone, so there you are. :) Ans Susan - you do learn pretty much from the beginning, don't you? So you learn the modern way, of course?

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Jean-François Delcamp
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Re: D01 - Lesson 1

Post by Jean-François Delcamp » Sun Nov 14, 2010 1:52 pm

Chris NewVillage wrote:
Jean-François Delcamp wrote: C'est un détail, mais, pouvez-vous stopper les résonances ?
Please, can you damp the preceding note ?
Thank you, Mr. Delcamp, for reviewing & responding.

Wow! :shock: Considering the damping makes the piece much more difficult. I have to work on it.

FYI: The D01 delcamp_volume1.pdf I downloaded from "Collection of scores for guitar - levels D01 to D03" don't show the damping marks you showed. Is that the correct download? Or, is there another location to check?
:merci:
Hello Chris,
I have just updated the volume D01,


2010-11-14 volume D01,
General update for lessons.
Correction of fingering on pages 4-58,
addition of pages 5, 41, 59.
Damp the preceding note with the finger indicated.JPG
Old Mac donald.JPG
:arrow: Download : viewtopic.php?f=57&t=7589
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.
:( + ♫ = :)

SusanGRas

Re: D01 - Lesson 1

Post by SusanGRas » Sun Nov 14, 2010 5:09 pm

Hi Peer! Yes, I had not touched the guitar until this year, my 53rd. I did take a couple private lessons before taking the community college class because I heard that if I started something incorrectly it would be hard to change later on. But I have read positives for both positions. In this forum as a matter of fact. Thanks for mentioning my video. Susan

Chris NewVillage

Re: D01 - Lesson 1

Post by Chris NewVillage » Sun Nov 14, 2010 6:42 pm

Jean-François Delcamp wrote:
Hello Chris,
I have just updated the volume D01,

2010-11-14 volume D01,
General update for lessons.
Correction of fingering on pages 4-58,
addition of pages 5, 41, 59.
Damp the preceding note with the finger indicated.JPG
Old Mac donald.JPG
:arrow: Download : viewtopic.php?f=57&t=7589
Awesome! :merci:

Chip_McCullough

Re: D01 - Lesson 1

Post by Chip_McCullough » Mon Nov 15, 2010 1:53 am

Okay everyone. Here goes. . .

Chip_McCullough

Re: D01 - Lesson 1

Post by Chip_McCullough » Mon Nov 15, 2010 2:20 am

Hello all. Any help with instrument position, and/or general technique would be helpful.

Once again into the breach.

DarrenV

Re: D01 - Lesson 1

Post by DarrenV » Mon Nov 15, 2010 3:10 am

Can someone please clarify the damping that is being requested. In the example above where it starts with notes: babb and there is the symbol above the note with the number 2. It says to damp the preceding note with the finger indicated. Is this just a left hand technique or is it also a right hand technique, as it shows in a different bar the p being mentioned? I just don't want to practice the wrong thing. Is this for phrasing purposes, as I don't see any rest involved.

Thanks,

Darren

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Dragonbones
Posts: 321
Joined: Fri Sep 11, 2009 3:01 pm
Location: Taibei, Taiwan

Re: D01 - Lesson 1

Post by Dragonbones » Mon Nov 15, 2010 3:27 am

Hi Darren, I'm just a beginner but after reading various threads and webpages on damping, I think that means the following: (others please correct me if I'm wrong)

When you play the A with your left middle finger (2), normally you would just press the tip precisely on the 2nd fret 3rd string without touching any other strings.

But here, to damp the B, lay the finger down slightly, partway toward playing a barre, what some call a 'lazy barre', so that the finger also touches (and thus silences) the 2nd string.
Darren Vass wrote:Is this just a left hand technique or is it also a right hand technique, as it shows in a different bar the p being mentioned?
My understanding (again, requesting correction if wrong) is that damping is done with either the LH or RH depending on the situation; the professor has written out a series of symbols to show that any of the four LH fingers can be used, as can the pima right hand fingers.

I think there are two basic LH techniques and several RH ones:
1. lazy barre, left hand (see above; I think this is probably what Prof. Delcamp wants with his symbols 1 2 3 4 but look forward to confirmation of this.)
2. reaching to touch a string with the flesh of a LH finger which is not being used at the moment
3. using a rest stroke with the thumb, which then silences the next string up (use this if available, as it is easy)
4. using a rest stroke with i, m or a, which silences the next string down (use this if available, as it is easy)
5. placing an unused p, i, m or a on a string to silencing it while playing another, e.g. play high open E, then at the same time that you play the next note, e.g. D on string 2, you place an unused i, m or a finger on the 1st string to silence it. In Prof. Delcamp's 2nd picture there's a D open 4th followed by a B open 2nd; when I play the B I'm just putting my thumb on the D as if about to play it (but not actually playing it) to mute it. I hope that is what our teacher intends.
6. using the back side of the thumb to silence a string, e.g. the 6th, at the same time that it starts to play another, e.g. the 5th (I'm trying this now with the low E, followed by low A in right side of Prof. Delcamp's first picture above; I'm not sure if this is the best choice but it seems to be working for me when I play with a relatively low wrist angle, and if I dig the thumb in slightly deeper than I normally would)
7. using any RH finger to silence an earlier note, right after using that RH finger to play the following note. (This doesn't seem as precise in terms of note duration, as it may let the earlier note ring slightly long.)
8. (Edit) I've also seen some describe using the thumb, e.g. on an open D then open E, to play the first note, then touch it to silence it just before playing the next note. It seems to me that this is fine if there's a rest indicated between the two. If not, e.g. if they are consecutive half notes, it seems that this technique would fail to give the first note its full time value -- someone on the forum described it as 'stealing a rest'. I'd be very interested to hear comments on this.

Hopefully our dear teacher and others can clarify and add to, or correct this.
Last edited by Dragonbones on Mon Nov 15, 2010 7:00 am, edited 3 times in total.
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Chip_McCullough

Re: D01 - Lesson 1

Post by Chip_McCullough » Mon Nov 15, 2010 4:22 am

Thanks Dragonbones. Your post was extremely helpful. I was not sure what to make of the notation provided.

Tarbaby (1953 - 2016)

Re: D01 - Lesson 1

Post by Tarbaby (1953 - 2016) » Mon Nov 15, 2010 6:17 am

Thank you Dragonbones!

I was about to tell Chip the same things when he posted, but got called away until now. You did a much better job of it than I would have.

It's really great the way everybody is helping each other out on this thread!

:discussion:

:delcamp_ cool:

Alan

DarrenV

Re: D01 - Lesson 1

Post by DarrenV » Mon Nov 15, 2010 12:23 pm

Thanks as well Dragonbones. Your explanation really helped. Correspondingly, I found a few good examples on YouTube. I did not know whether I could post links here to YouTube or not, so I'm not going to for now. Just do a search there on Guitar Damping and you'll get quite a few examples.

Wow, this damping makes things more difficult!

Darren

Chip_McCullough

Re: D01 - Lesson 1

Post by Chip_McCullough » Tue Nov 16, 2010 12:50 am

You are right Tarbaby,
The amount of help from other users is wonderful. I also enjoy being able to watch other players tackle similar challenges to my own.

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