D03 Classical guitar lesson 1

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PDF, MP3, Vidéos, Lessons : Level D01 - Level D02 - Level D03 - Level D04 - Level D05 - Level D06 - Level D07 - Level D08 - Level D09 - Level D10 - Level D11 - Level D12.
Jeremy Hickerson
Amateur luthier
Posts: 621
Joined: Tue Feb 03, 2009 5:20 am
Location: Salem, Oregon

Re: D03 Lesson 1

Post by Jeremy Hickerson » Tue Nov 23, 2010 4:25 am

Thanks for the advice on microphones, I will check into getting something better. I'm thinking that the hum may be due to an ungrounded outlet, I'll try using an extension cord to plug into a grounded one next time (old house!).
Jeremy

Guitarras: 1973 Manouk Papazian (Spruce/Morado), two I have built, and an old Telesforo Julve parlor size

Jeremy Hickerson
Amateur luthier
Posts: 621
Joined: Tue Feb 03, 2009 5:20 am
Location: Salem, Oregon

Re: D03 Lesson 1

Post by Jeremy Hickerson » Tue Nov 23, 2010 4:34 am

Julio, very nice! Good strong tone, and very relaxed playing.

Jeremy
Jeremy

Guitarras: 1973 Manouk Papazian (Spruce/Morado), two I have built, and an old Telesforo Julve parlor size

RicDavalos

Re: D03 Lesson 1

Post by RicDavalos » Tue Nov 23, 2010 9:56 pm

Hello,

Here's my first ever videos put on this forum.

[media]https://youtu.be/XcJJ_wUr3b0[/media]

[media]https://youtu.be/f-yxmfSU8gI&feature=mfu_in_order&list=UL[/media]

[media]https://youtu.be/xIUNnxv89CQ[/media]

I'm still working on the Gaillarde. Figuring out the fingerings has so far been the hardest part. However, if I just play it with the capo at the 5th fret and follow the music as if I were playing it without a capo, it sounds pretty good.
The Carcassi Andantino is coming along. Playing it with Mr. Delcamp's dampening suggestion is taking some finger cordination that I'm not used to doing. Just using free strokes would be much easier, but that's not the point.

Thank you for watching.
:D

Jeremy Hickerson
Amateur luthier
Posts: 621
Joined: Tue Feb 03, 2009 5:20 am
Location: Salem, Oregon

Re: D03 Lesson 1

Post by Jeremy Hickerson » Wed Nov 24, 2010 6:58 pm

Ric,

Beautiful arpeggios on the Carulli pieces, very relaxed and flowing!

One thing I noticed when I played the Marazula was that some of the left hand notes occurred again soon and the hand could be left holding them down so they would not have to be re-fingered each time. The "D" on the 2nd string and the "A" on the 3rd string are some examples, there might have been a few others. This also has the benefit of allowing the melody notes to ring-over and overlap similar to a harp. Whether or not this is desirable can be debated, but I like it! Also it makes less work for the left hand.

Jeremy
Jeremy

Guitarras: 1973 Manouk Papazian (Spruce/Morado), two I have built, and an old Telesforo Julve parlor size

Julio Galindo

Re: D03 Lesson 1

Post by Julio Galindo » Sat Nov 27, 2010 3:07 am

Thanks Jeremy! well done Ric!

i think the Marazula is the trickiest one of all these lesson 1 pieces. Dampening is hard, i finally got this one today i just haven´t found the time to record it. Practice it as slow as possible and do as many repetitions as you can for 5 minutes. It gets easier every day its amazing!!

Irene Tirtajana

Re: D03 Lesson 1

Post by Irene Tirtajana » Sat Nov 27, 2010 2:57 pm

Wonderful rendition of the pieces, Ric! I'm still plodding with Marazula - very, very slowly.

I damp the 1st bass note of each measure before I sound the 2nd bass note. The effect is somewhat choppy. Anyone has suggestions?

RicDavalos

Re: D03 Lesson 1

Post by RicDavalos » Sat Nov 27, 2010 4:25 pm

Thank you all for the complements.

Jeremy, I hadn't noticed I was lifting my fingers up. I've been practicing with leaving my fingers on and it does sound a lot smoother.

Irene, are you placing your thumb down on the string before the second base note? What I've done is not to place my thumb down on any string after I play the first note. I wait until the last possible moment to play the second base note and I damp the first base note with the side of my thumb. At first it feels like an odd combination of movements. Keep practising it slowly. Try just playing the base notes and focus on damping the first base note and playing the second base note on the correct beat.

Julio Galindo

Re: D03 Lesson 1

Post by Julio Galindo » Sat Nov 27, 2010 4:30 pm

hi Irene,

restroke the open A, then you´ll be ready to play the 4th string without touching the 5th. hope it works for you.

Jeremy Hickerson
Amateur luthier
Posts: 621
Joined: Tue Feb 03, 2009 5:20 am
Location: Salem, Oregon

Re: D03 Lesson 1

Post by Jeremy Hickerson » Sat Nov 27, 2010 5:51 pm

I have been doing the damping stroke just as if I were playing the string with the pad of my thumb or finger. So I execute the real thumb stroke (for instance) and then immediately "play" the damping stroke as a quick touch with the pad and off. It occurs just after the real stroke and (hopefully) before any other strokes that are about to be played. This works well most of the time and has the advantage of being so much like a real stroke that it benefits from the skills/muscle memory we already have built up, it seems very accurate. This approach has trouble in something like the Carulli quatro or parts of the Gaillarde where the damping is done after a 16th note in the melody so the thumb damp has to be done in something like 1/32 of a beat. Maybe I need to work on doing the damp simultaneous with the next melody note. The side-of-the thumb damp would probably work better here, but I like the consistancy of a single approach and the accuracy of the thumb or finger pad.

Also on the Marazula, I started thinking about my idea of leaving the left-hand fingers down (similar to the way a folk player would hold the whole chord down while fingerpicking). This is kind of opposite to the damping we're doing. For instance, if you leave the low G down, you will need to damp both the low G and the open D, not just the open D. Likewise by letting the melody notes ring maybe they should then be damped (but I think it connects the melody in a good way so I don't).

As far as choppiness, it seems like if you only damp the note in question and you execute the damp after the next note (the note that repaces the damped note) has been played, then it should still sound smooth.
Jeremy

Guitarras: 1973 Manouk Papazian (Spruce/Morado), two I have built, and an old Telesforo Julve parlor size

Julio Galindo

Re: D03 Lesson 1

Post by Julio Galindo » Sun Nov 28, 2010 6:36 am

hello everyone,

Here´s my video #2 for this lesson. let me know your comments thanks!

[media]https://youtu.be/6dwL9-AJTNY[/media]

RicDavalos

Re: D03 Lesson 1

Post by RicDavalos » Mon Nov 29, 2010 1:49 am

Julio good job. It sounds good.

Here's my Carcassi Opus 59. I did it with and without damping in order to hear the differences.

With damping
[media]https://youtu.be/JNdxWa5X1Q0&feature=youtube_gdata_player[/media]

No damping
[media]https://youtu.be/_B_QsH6fOWU&feature=youtube_gdata_player[/media]

Thanks for watching
Last edited by RicDavalos on Mon Nov 29, 2010 1:54 am, edited 1 time in total.

Greg Johnson

Re: D03 Lesson 1

Post by Greg Johnson » Mon Nov 29, 2010 4:04 am

Julio, I thought you did a great job. The right hand is causing me problems on that piece, both the damping and the fingering that Mr. Delcamp has written, I find it kind of clumsy. Anyway, I can play it very slow but I am going to have to work out an easier method with the right hand to get it more natural sounding.

Julio Galindo

Re: D03 Lesson 1

Post by Julio Galindo » Mon Nov 29, 2010 5:15 am

thank you Greg!

i think this piece is very important because we get to combine p i m a in very challenging ways right at the beginning of this level. When you work on the improvisation excercises you get to choose your own fingering. A whole new world of possibilities just opens to you is very exciting!

Julio Galindo

Re: D03 Lesson 1

Post by Julio Galindo » Mon Nov 29, 2010 5:44 am

thank you Ric!

I liked the no damping one better. However, we only need to damp that open D note according to the score.

I would like to know a few tips on interpretation. Is slowing down at the end really allowed? or improvising a few extra notes? I´ve also noticed that chords are sometimes arpeggioed instead of plucked at the same time is that ok?

RicDavalos

Re: D03 Lesson 1

Post by RicDavalos » Mon Nov 29, 2010 8:18 pm

Julio_Cesar_CancunMx wrote:thank you Ric!

I liked the no damping one better. However, we only need to damp that open D note according to the score.

I would like to know a few tips on interpretation. Is slowing down at the end really allowed? or improvising a few extra notes? I´ve also noticed that chords are sometimes arpeggioed instead of plucked at the same time is that ok?
Julio, the no damping is a whole lot easier to play as well. For the Carcassi Opus 59, Mr. Delcamp also recommended damping the notes played with the i finger, so your alternating damping between the i and the p. Basically, every quarter note is damped when the next one is played.

As far as interpretation goes, I've heard several recordings of the same piece and every one has been different in some way or another. I would say to experiment with different things and see what works best with whatever you are playing. For example, I've been working on Moonlight Sonata for awhile now and it's a dramatic enough piece, that slowing down at the end would just seem like overkill (to me at least) but Lagrima slowed down at the end sounds nice. We play music to express ourselves and the little extra things we throw in there is one way of doing it.

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