D01 Classical guitar lesson 5

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MikeJay
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Location: Valais, Switzerland

Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 5

Post by MikeJay » Mon Feb 21, 2011 8:38 am

Hi,

I've just joined the online lessons although I have been following them since December. I've been playing for several years but entirely on my own. The lessons are a great way to finally work on basic techniques that I have been avoiding all these years. Here are my first uploads.

Mike
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Penelope Phillips-Armand

Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 5

Post by Penelope Phillips-Armand » Mon Feb 21, 2011 10:01 pm

RossStep, you've really got the apoyando down well. I find it relatively easy with the thumb, but I'm still not satisfied with the other fingers.

Linda, you play very securely without looking at the frets; I've only begun working on that and it seems to make for a better playing position and a stronger sound. Yet I also hear some interference from your fingers sliding up and down the strings, making a whistling noise. Might it be possible to tone that down?

Remark: when I have to play the thumb and another finger simultaneously and close together--so there's only one string in between, as in the first full measure of the Valse (that is, the two G's), I have trouble making them sound at the same time. I've tried spreading them vertically--playing the thumb higher up near the fretboard, with the fourth finger plunging toward the bridge--but they still seem to jam and hinder each other. Any suggestions, from anyone?

I wanted to upload one more time during this lesson, but since yesterday I've been having mechanical trouble with a slipping first string: it jumps an octave or more downward when I try to bring it up to pitch, which, judging from other forum entries on that subject, appears to be a recurring problem. I've changed the string and left a long, long tail; I'm tuning it up one half-step at a time, with several hours of stretching in between.

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LindaWoodford
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Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 5

Post by LindaWoodford » Mon Feb 21, 2011 10:27 pm

Thanks Penelope - yes I know what you mean, I get a kind of squeaking on the strings from my left hand. I guess a bit more practice and relaxing more will help reduce it. I also need to work on making a nicer sound with my right hand - it's currently a bit clunky.... soooo much to think about :chaud:

Remark: when I have to play the thumb and another finger simultaneously and close together--so there's only one string in between, as in the first full measure of the Valse (that is, the two G's), I have trouble making them sound at the same time
I read a suggestion to play it like you are undoing a wingnut. I also have the same problem. On the few occasions that I get it right, it sounds so much better...

Steven Lee Thornhill

Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 5

Post by Steven Lee Thornhill » Wed Feb 23, 2011 6:01 am

Here is my attempt. I was behind and needed to get this recorded so not as good as I would like it to be.

[media]https://youtu.be/Cf1cY88SJZg[/media]



[media]https://youtu.be/LrcEJShsxx8[/media]

RossStep

Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 5

Post by RossStep » Thu Feb 24, 2011 1:38 am

Thanks Penelope, the rest stroke is tricky. I think a little give in the fingertip joint helps.
Ross

SusanGRas

Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 5

Post by SusanGRas » Thu Feb 24, 2011 7:01 pm

Hi Linda2, Thank you for the suggestion on going to level 2 for the talk on the same exercise. I am following the lesson plan but currently am without a means of recording. I plan to fix that shortly and can hopefully post before we go to the next lesson. I actually wish there was more discussion on what we actually post and am happy to go to other levels for input on what they are doing! Great idea! Thanks! Susan

SusanGRas

Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 5

Post by SusanGRas » Thu Feb 24, 2011 8:38 pm

Hi, Actually I thought maybe someone might know. I was able to make a recording with a zoom h2 and I can see the wav file it has created on the little memory disk. But when I transfer this to my computer I am not able to hear it at all. I try opening it with various things like real player, quicktime, windows media player. It actually goes in itunes but when I double click on it, nothing. Would anyone know what I might be doing wrong? Thanks if so. Susan

SusanGRas

Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 5

Post by SusanGRas » Thu Feb 24, 2011 10:28 pm

Well I got it. This has been weeks and very frustrating. Turns out I was operating the h2 incorrectly. So all this time I thought I was recording I was not. There was a file, it was just empty. I will try to upload the files now. I had to kind of repractice but I have to move on!

SusanGRas

Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 5

Post by SusanGRas » Thu Feb 24, 2011 10:56 pm

Here is the Jean-François Delcamp : Polyphonie, numero 2 (Rest stroke) and Antonio Cano-Curriella : Divertissement (Rest stroke). I uploaded to youtube but that didn't seem to work. Then I tried to upload the wav file here and that didn't work. Now I've converted to mp3 and will try that.
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LindaWoodford
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Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 5

Post by LindaWoodford » Fri Feb 25, 2011 8:05 am

Well done, Susan! I know the sense of achievement (and frankly relief) when you have struggled with the technicalities of recording and finally get it online!
You make a lovely mellow sound when you play and I am very impressed that you can play the polyphonie notes simultaneously.

Actually, before leaving this lesson for the next one, I wanted to thank everyone who went to the effort to record and post, because I have learnt so much from your videos and sound recordings.

I feel neither qualified nor comfortable in giving critique, especially when I am struggling with the pieces myself. Being quite self-critical, it was sometimes a relief to see that my peers also had difficulty in perfecting some aspects, and other times inspirational to see how you managed to do it right.

I am trying to focus on two of my weak areas at the moment - making a softer, more melodic sound and damping. I was never taught how to damp and perhaps never previously appreciated the importance of tone quality. Moreover, I'm returning to playing after a long time off, and have jumped into the programme at this lesson, so perhaps missed some vitial tips. Could anyone help?

SusanGRas

Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 5

Post by SusanGRas » Fri Feb 25, 2011 4:49 pm

Hi linda2, I don't remember tone on our lesson 1 but here is a great help on damping. It had most of us thrown in the beginning. (I started the course then lost being able to use my video recorder and have been trying other means ever since) It was in our first lesson.


Re: D01 - Lesson 1

Postby Dragonbones » Monday 15 November 2010, 03:27 am
Hi Darren, I'm just a beginner but after reading various threads and webpages on damping, I think that means the following: (others please correct me if I'm wrong)

When you play the A with your left middle finger (2), normally you would just press the tip precisely on the 2nd fret 3rd string without touching any other strings.

But here, to damp the B, lay the finger down slightly, partway toward playing a barre, what some call a 'lazy barre', so that the finger also touches (and thus silences) the 2nd string.

Darren Vass wrote:Is this just a left hand technique or is it also a right hand technique, as it shows in a different bar the p being mentioned?



My understanding (again, requesting correction if wrong) is that damping is done with either the LH or RH depending on the situation; the professor has written out a series of symbols to show that any of the four LH fingers can be used, as can the pima right hand fingers.

I think there are two basic LH techniques and several RH ones:
1. lazy barre, left hand (see above; I think this is probably what Prof. Delcamp wants with his symbols 1 2 3 4 but look forward to confirmation of this.)
2. reaching to touch a string with the flesh of a LH finger which is not being used at the moment
3. using a rest stroke with the thumb, which then silences the next string up (use this if available, as it is easy)
4. using a rest stroke with i, m or a, which silences the next string down (use this if available, as it is easy)
5. placing an unused p, i, m or a on a string to silencing it while playing another, e.g. play high open E, then at the same time that you play the next note, e.g. D on string 2, you place an unused i, m or a finger on the 1st string to silence it. In Prof. Delcamp's 2nd picture there's a D open 4th followed by a B open 2nd; when I play the B I'm just putting my thumb on the D as if about to play it (but not actually playing it) to mute it. I hope that is what our teacher intends.
6. using the back side of the thumb to silence a string, e.g. the 6th, at the same time that it starts to play another, e.g. the 5th (I'm trying this now with the low E, followed by low A in right side of Prof. Delcamp's first picture above; I'm not sure if this is the best choice but it seems to be working for me when I play with a relatively low wrist angle, and if I dig the thumb in slightly deeper than I normally would)
7. using any RH finger to silence an earlier note, right after using that RH finger to play the following note. (This doesn't seem as precise in terms of note duration, as it may let the earlier note ring slightly long.)
8. (Edit) I've also seen some describe using the thumb, e.g. on an open D then open E, to play the first note, then touch it to silence it just before playing the next note. It seems to me that this is fine if there's a rest indicated between the two. If not, e.g. if they are consecutive half notes, it seems that this technique would fail to give the first note its full time value -- someone on the forum described it as 'stealing a rest'. I'd be very interested to hear comments on this.

Hopefully our dear teacher and others can clarify and add to, or correct this.
Last edited by Dragonbones on Monday 15 November 2010, 07:00 am, edited 3 times in total.
2008 Sergio Huerta concierto,
San Miguel de Allende, Mexico

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Dragonbones

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Someone else chimed in that this was a great explanation.
As for tone, possibly the other lessons talk on it.
Thanks for listening to my recordings!
Susan

Penelope Phillips-Armand

D01 Classical guitar lesson 5, going on 6

Post by Penelope Phillips-Armand » Fri Feb 25, 2011 9:03 pm

Congrats, Susan, for finding a workaround and getting your playing back online. It sounds fine.
Thanks, too, for republishing Dragonbones' distillation of damping techniques. Though the lesson plans for this forum are unquestionably cumulative, one never knows what helpful hints one is going find by looking ahead to the more advanced groups, or backward to earlier lessons
that are being encountered by newer students.

For the last three weeks, I've been trying a lateral expansion to include the French DO1 section, which is very active and candid and which sometimes offers features that haven't appeared in the English-speaking forum. Since you expressed uncertainty some time ago about what's expected of us in the way of improvisation, you'd be particularly interested in the topical discussion at http://www.guitareclassiquedelcamp.com/ ... 74&t=24988. If you can read French--and this goes also for Linda (living in Switzerland--La Suisse Romande?) and for anyone else who can understand French--I'd encourage you to try to have a look. M. Delcamp even gives a demonstration, complete with vocal embellishment.

Then come along, indeed, to lesson 6.

SusanGRas

Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 5

Post by SusanGRas » Fri Feb 25, 2011 9:39 pm

If I may say Penelope, YOU ARE JUST GREAT! And maybe I can use the google translator as I don't read or speak French. Thanks for the tip! Susan

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LindaWoodford
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Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 5

Post by LindaWoodford » Fri Feb 25, 2011 9:57 pm

Yep, I'll also be needing the translator - I'm a Brit, living in the German-speaking part.
Thanks Susan for the really helpful posting - it is slowly beginning to make sense. I also read through the full conversation in Lesson 1, revisited the last pieces (now that I understand the annotations), and then went on to discover page 59.... It is the damping equivalent to page 58 for polyphony... be warned :shock:

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MikeJay
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Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 5

Post by MikeJay » Sat Feb 26, 2011 4:18 pm

Hi Susan,

Very nice interpretation -- expressive, pensive, plaintive, calm. I like it. My own hectic playing needs a bit more work!

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