D01 Classical guitar lesson 6

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Jean-François Delcamp
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D01 Classical guitar lesson 6

Post by Jean-François Delcamp » Tue Feb 22, 2011 7:11 am

Hello everyone,
Please start by downloading the new version of volume D01 that I updated today.
If you are new to the course, please read this message to familiarize yourself with the conditions for participating in the lessons. You should also read the first message in lesson 1, where you will find advice on how to make the most of your study time and on the methods of practising that I recommend.



First we will study some technical exercises from volume D01.
These exercises will work upon the technique of simultaneous rest strokes (apoyando) with the thumb and index finger, and also with the thumb and middle finger.
The rest stroke is a way to play the string with a finger movement which plucks the string and then continues to move until it comes to rest on the adjacent string. Working on this technique will allow you to discover the best position for your plucking hand (the right hand if you are right-handed).
If you are already used to plucking the strings with free strokes, the simultaneous rest strokes with the thumb and a finger will seem difficult to you, even impossible. But be assured, with patience and perseverence, this difficulty will be resolved in 30 minutes. I know from experience that the first tries are truly discouraging, particularly for adults. It is for this reason that I wish to reassure you in advance, take heart, you will be able to do it.
Page 55 : Jean-François Delcamp - Scales in third, number 6. (Free stroke)
Page 58 : Jean-François Delcamp - Rest stroke, number 16. (Rest stroke)




Don't forget to practise the improvisation exercises from Lesson 7 regularly, so that you'll be ready for the next lesson.


Finally, we'll look at 4 tunes, pages 29 to 32. These tunes will work upon the technique of simultaneous rest strokes (apoyando) with the thumb and index finger, and also with the thumb and middle finger.
Anonyme : Donne-moi la fleur (Rest stroke)
Anonyme : Ricercar (Rest stroke)
Fernando Sor : Leçon I opus 60 (Rest stroke - Free stroke)
Matteo Carcassi : Exercice opus 59 (Rest stroke)







I ask you first to work on all these exercises and tunes for a week and then to upload your recordings of:
Anonyme : Donne-moi la fleur (Rest stroke)
Fernando Sor : Leçon I opus 60 (Rest stroke - Free stroke)


I look forward to hearing you play these exercises and tunes.


I thank Geoff (GeoffB) who has helped in the translation of my lessons into English.


Jean-François
:( + ♫ = :)

Penelope Phillips-Armand

Re: preparing for improvisation

Post by Penelope Phillips-Armand » Wed Feb 23, 2011 12:09 pm

At the first mention of the forthcoming lesson on improvisation, I plunged in with gusto....but lately I’ve been easing off, waiting for further guidance and for examples to help me along.

Some problems that are hindering my progress:
(1) The only one-note improvisations I can envision would be rhythmic variations, and perhaps shifts among octaves. If those are the only available options, how can we avoid playing the same thing more than once?
Moreover, most traditional music is based on repetition of motifs, whether rhythmic or melodic.
(2) The greater the number of available notes for improvisation, the more tempting it is to play with harmonic progressions. With the four notes given for Lesson 7, for instance--D, G, A and B--one can alternate between a G-major triad and an open fifth on D. The present lesson should make it easier to play chords, but I still don’t see how to avoid repetition.
(3) Especially for the improvisations on two or three notes, I’ve been resorting to historic ornaments--trills, turns, etc. But I must admit that I contrive everything in advance, that I practice what I’ve written, and there is no spontaneity in that! I’ve studied a bit of composition, a bit of music history, but very little improvisation; for me, at least, theory comes before practice. Do iyou think that can change?

I continue fiddling around with the prospect of improvisation, but I look forward to the next lesson’s guidance with increasing curiosity.

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MikeJay
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Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 6

Post by MikeJay » Wed Feb 23, 2011 6:29 pm

Hi Penelope,

I haven't actually started on them yet but what about variations in dynamics and tone color? For a single note, the only thing left, as you point out is rhythm.

Mike

Penelope Phillips-Armand

Dynamics and tone color

Post by Penelope Phillips-Armand » Wed Feb 23, 2011 9:38 pm

Thanks, Mike, for your suggestions; I'll try them.

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LindaWoodford
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Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 6

Post by LindaWoodford » Wed Feb 23, 2011 9:46 pm

Ahh, and there was me thinking you would have been overjoyed at seeing that page 58 was still on the practice list :wink:

Having said that, I'm actually quite pleased, beacause I still can't get it right...
this difficulty will be resolved in 30 minutes
Hmmm, it's been a long 30 minutes :chaud:

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MikeJay
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Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 6

Post by MikeJay » Thu Feb 24, 2011 6:54 am

Hi Linda,

I find both of the pg 58 exercises also very hard. I think I started working on exercise 15 already in December. I still haven't smoothed it out although I'm making progress. I think they are very important exercises. It probably isn't possible to get them right until the right hand position is very nearly correct and very relaxed.

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LindaWoodford
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Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 6

Post by LindaWoodford » Sun Feb 27, 2011 12:10 pm

Thanks Mike, I've been filing down my nails in a vain attempt to stop the 'twanging', but I have the feeling that better technique would solve the problem better.

Anyway, I have another question...

In Donne-moi le Fleur, bar 12: how are people damping the A played in bar 11?
There is no instruction on the score. It seems as though Mr Delcamp damps after playing the D with his RH thumb, but I guess an alternative is to use the spare left finger 1, which would allow it to be damped simultaneously with playing the D (in theory).
I know it's a tiny detail, but I am new to damping, and have it as a bit of a focus at the moment.

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MikeJay
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Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 6

Post by MikeJay » Sun Feb 27, 2011 12:40 pm

Hi,

I've opted for the thumb option. Also for damping the G at the end of the 14th bar of the Carcassi exercise for which no damping is indicated (I think he's trying to make us think a little).

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LindaWoodford
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Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 6

Post by LindaWoodford » Sun Feb 27, 2011 11:15 pm

OK, then thumb it is :)

Here is my Donne Moi La Fleur...

[media]https://youtu.be/R-S5JlQR004[/media]

Chris NewVillage

Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 6

Post by Chris NewVillage » Mon Feb 28, 2011 6:29 pm

:bravo:

Penelope Phillips-Armand

Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 6

Post by Penelope Phillips-Armand » Wed Mar 02, 2011 9:50 pm

Lovely, Linda. I hear much less extraneous noise than in the pieces you played three weeks ago, and you endow the melody with a refreshing lilt.

Question for anyone who can help me: when using the rest stroke to play thirds, as in exercise 6 on page 55, where do the fingers come to rest?
It seems they must be moved over two whole strings, so that one of the notes doesn't get muffled before the other, but that feels complicated and promises to be even more so when we start playing three notes at a time on the upper strings. Is that right?

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MikeJay
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Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 6

Post by MikeJay » Thu Mar 03, 2011 6:50 am

Hi Penelope,

If you look just to the right of the title line of ex. 6 you'll see that he has in mind tirando -- so no rest strokes.

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LindaWoodford
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Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 6

Post by LindaWoodford » Thu Mar 03, 2011 7:06 am

Ahh you were just ahead of me, Mike :)

Talking of making things a bit easier, I've been changing the LH fingering for bar 3 of Ricercar. I find that sliding into position II already with F# played by finger 1 means that Finger 4 for the A has more support - and is less likely to hit the wrong note (which sounds so awful, it makes me laugh)

With the Sor and Carcassi pieces, my RH thumb is fighting with my fingers over who plays the G string! I'd be interested to hear who plays the first two bars of the Sor piece with the thumb, and who with i.

PS Thanks Chris and Penelope for the praise - I used a different mic this time, but am happier to take the credit myself :)

SusanGRas

Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 6

Post by SusanGRas » Fri Mar 04, 2011 6:25 pm

Great job Linda! Your left hand stays nice and steady. I tend to move it around too much. I'd better get to work on recording before I forget how I was able to do it! Actually I am going to try to get the video to work again because there definitely are visuals to watch for as well and seeing your left hand shows me it is possible to keep it in the right place.

Penelope Phillips-Armand

Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 6

Post by Penelope Phillips-Armand » Fri Mar 04, 2011 9:20 pm

So tirando it is, on Exercise 6--just as it is for the chords in the Sor piece. Thanks, Mike; I didn't see that because I hadn't expected it.

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