D01 Classical guitar lesson 8

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Jean-François Delcamp
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D01 Classical guitar lesson 8

Post by Jean-François Delcamp » Tue Apr 19, 2011 9:35 am

Hello everyone,
Please start by downloading the new version of volume D01 that I updated today.
If you are new to the course, please read this message to familiarize yourself with the conditions for participating in the lessons. You should also read the first message in lesson 1, where you will find advice on how to make the most of your study time and on the methods of practising that I recommend.


First we will study some technical exercises from volume D01.
Page 57 - Jean-François Delcamp : ARPEGGIOS




Finally, we'll look at five tunes, pages 39 to 43.
Page 39 - Anonyme : Menuet en ré majeur

Page 40 - Anonyme : Danse anglaise

Page 41 - Jean-François Delcamp : Accompagnement de blues

Page 42 - Anonyme : Fais dodo, Colas mon p'tit frère

Page 43 - Joseph Küffner : Duo opus 168 N°15



In order to mark the beat yourself, you need to count the smallest rhythmic values out loud as you play, as indicated on the score: "1 e 2 e 3 e" ("1 and 2 and 3 and" in English)
Using a metronome is useful, but it is only a temporary crutch to lean on. You will benefit far more by counting the beats out loud as you play than by using a metronome. Internalizing the rhythm allows us in time to achieve both freedom and discipline when playing, that is, to be a musician.
If counting the smallest values out loud seems difficult, or very difficult, to you, it only means that you have to persevere, or persevere a lot more. Keep at it with determination until it becomes easy and natural for you. When, after having practised it long enough, this exercise of counting out loud while you play becomes easy, then you don't need to bother with it any more.
When you start working on a new piece, start by working very slowly, concentrating on precision. The essential thing is that you should play the music perfectly, that your rhythm should be precise, your sound well controlled, and your playing musical and expressive.
Speed will come with your new skills acquired in time through work. You should not worry about speed when tackling a new piece. At the beginning, such a preoccupation would only hinder you in your progress. It is only once you have mastered the piece within the comfort of a slow tempo, that you can start to think about playing progressively faster until finally you reach the right tempo.

You can memorize different tempi (tempos) by mentally associating each one with a tune you have learnt by heart. Learn a suitable tune for each tempo. Begin with Good-morning to all (the same tune as Happy Birthday) for the tempo of 120 (beats per minute).



I ask you first to work on all these exercises and tunes for a week and then to upload your recordings of:
Page 57, number 12 - Jean-François Delcamp : ARPEGGIOS
Page 39 - Anonyme : Menuet en ré majeur
Page 42 - Anonyme : Fais dodo, Colas mon p'tit frère


I look forward to hearing you play these exercises and tunes.

I thank Geoff (GeoffB) who has helped in the translation of my lessons into English.

Jean-François
:( + ♫ = :)

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Jean-François Delcamp
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Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 8

Post by Jean-François Delcamp » Wed Apr 20, 2011 5:39 am

+ D02 - page 72 ex. 1, 2 & 3.
In these right hand exercises, you will work on getting a smooth join between notes, that is to say that you will end one or more notes at the exact moment that you start the following note (or notes).
[media]https://youtu.be/BJmVGaYhFWk[/media]
[media]https://youtu.be/LNU_m_1s5dA[/media]
[media]https://youtu.be/Q1NWpoJprEA[/media]
:( + ♫ = :)

Penelope Phillips-Armand

Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 8

Post by Penelope Phillips-Armand » Fri Apr 29, 2011 10:24 pm

I've been so intrigued with the blues accompaniment and the duet that I've take awhile getting around to the initial download, as requested. Anyway, here are my first serious attempts at this lesson.
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MikeJay
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Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 8

Post by MikeJay » Sun May 01, 2011 4:15 pm

Hi,

I find that I divide most of my practice time between the hand exercises, particularly the infamous exercise 15 on page 58 and the pieces in previous exercises -- trying to get them to sound better. As usual, I'm not completely satisfied with my recordings -- work in progress. Here they are...
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Penelope Phillips-Armand

Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 8

Post by Penelope Phillips-Armand » Mon May 02, 2011 7:56 pm

Hi, Mike--

"Fais Dodo" has a few notes out of sync, but aside from that, your pieces sound quite good. Much to your credit: I hear all the notes and the bass and treble are in balance, especially in the Menuet.

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MikeJay
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Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 8

Post by MikeJay » Wed May 04, 2011 5:27 pm

Hi Penelope,

thanks for the feedback. You are right -- a few notes out of time, a few "air strokes" as well. Oh well, I still don't quite get it right but it continues to improve. Maybe some day... Anyway, I enjoy trying and am satisfied that it improves, as does your playing I can honestly add. So much patience is needed! Bon courage!

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GeoffB
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Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 8

Post by GeoffB » Fri May 20, 2011 11:47 am

Just a reminder to anyone who may not have seen the announcement, Jean-François is offering a year-end exam, with diploma, for those who are interested. You can read details in this and subsequent posts.

Anyone who wishes to enter but hasn't yet posted sufficient recordings will need to post them before the exam date, so be careful you don't leave it too late.

If anyone is put off by having to register on the Spanish forum to take the exam, don't be, as it is very easy to do, you don't need to speak Spanish, and I can provide guidance if necessary. Again, don't leave it until the last minute, as it may take a day or so to register.

(I'm repeating this message at all three levels of the course).

Geoff
Classical Guitar Forum.

"Experience is something you don't get until just after you need it." - Steven Wright

James Williams

Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 8

Post by James Williams » Sun May 22, 2011 12:42 am

Here's my lesson 8, finally. I've been frustrating myself with my right hand position. Still trying to figure out what works best.

Mike and Penelope, keep up the good work, it sounds good!
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Penelope Phillips-Armand

Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 8

Post by Penelope Phillips-Armand » Sun May 22, 2011 9:14 pm

Sounds pretty good to me, James. I can't hear where you may be having trouble with your right hand, but about three weeks ago Jean-Luc Beels, on the French forum, guided me toward an illustrated document sent him by one of his friends (a professor in Montpelier) which I've found helpful for checking several points ergonomically. It's in French, but the illustrations are helpful whether or not you read the text. Since it's complicated getting to the download link if you're not enrolled in the French forum, I'll try to send it to you now as an attachment.
Posture générale et placements des mains.pdf
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James Williams

Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 8

Post by James Williams » Sun May 22, 2011 9:50 pm

The problem I'm having is how to position my hand best for the thumb rest strokes. My whole hand wants to move when I play a note with the thumb. I just started doing finger stretches and dexterity exercises, so hopefully that will help some. You can't hear it on the recording because I often end up playing free strokes with the thumb when playing the higher strings. Thanks for the document on Posture. I'm going to read it as best I can. I know I'll figure it out eventually, but in the meantime it gets frustrating because it's holding me back.

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GeoffB
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Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 8

Post by GeoffB » Sun May 22, 2011 10:13 pm

I've just posted a guide here for any students thinking of taking the year-end exam, with an explanation of the essential steps you need to take beforehand.

Geoff
Classical Guitar Forum.

"Experience is something you don't get until just after you need it." - Steven Wright

Penelope Phillips-Armand

Re: the exam

Post by Penelope Phillips-Armand » Mon May 23, 2011 6:44 pm

Thanks, Geoff. I'm following the information as it becomes available, but since I myself am striving to reform some painful habits--to the point of taking my bearings from a mirror, rather than looking directly at the fretboard; I can't yet rely sufficiently on motor memory nor touch--I haven't decided whether I want to add the pressure of an examination at this point. Over the summer, I may even set about reworking the entire first-year course from what I've learned during these past three weeks!

Will the test consist solely of applying the expected technical (and interpretive) skills to the Volt, or might we be asked to play other things--e. g. scales, arpeggios, etc.--as well, without warning?

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GeoffB
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Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 8

Post by GeoffB » Mon May 23, 2011 9:03 pm

The test consists solely of submitting that one piece, and of course you can start working on it now and continue until you've got a recording you're happy with, so it's probably worth a try even if you change your mind before the exam date. You don't commit yourself until you submit the piece.

Geoff
Classical Guitar Forum.

"Experience is something you don't get until just after you need it." - Steven Wright

Penelope Phillips-Armand

Re: exam

Post by Penelope Phillips-Armand » Tue May 24, 2011 11:21 am

Fair enough. That does seem worth a try.

Robert Goodwin

Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 8

Post by Robert Goodwin » Tue Jun 21, 2011 12:29 pm

I am a little frustrated with the scores in this lesson which repeatedly substitutes the G3-4th-fret (played with the '4' finger) for an open B2. It seems to add unnecessary complexity to the score with no apparent benefit other than the exercise of the '4' finger. If that is indeed the purpose then I am content to live with the added complexity but I would appreciate some clarification of this point. At the present time I feel as though I may be misunderstanding what is supposed to be going on.

Thanks in advance for any light you can shed on the use of the '4' finger.

EDIT: Although I already qualified to take the exam by doing lessons 1 through 7, I intend to complete the entire syllabus here before moving on to D02.

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