D01 Classical guitar lesson 03

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Jean-François Delcamp
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D01 Classical guitar lesson 03

Post by Jean-François Delcamp » Thu Nov 03, 2011 9:50 am

Hello everyone,
Please start by downloading the new version of volume D01 that I updated today.
If you are new to the course, please read this message to familiarize yourself with the conditions for participating in the lessons. You should also read the first message in lesson 1, where you will find advice on how to make the most of your study time and on the methods of practising that I recommend.



First we will study some technical exercises from volume D01.
Page 54: G major scale and C major scale, numbers 2 and 3. Be sure to damp the notes properly in the descending passages. To damp the notes in the descending passages: lean the fingers of the left hand against the vibrating strings. Work on controlling the volume by playing crescendo and decrescendo.







Finally, we'll look at nine simple tunes, pages 16 to 20
Anonyme : Scarborough fair

Anonyme : Ah vous dirai-je maman

Anonyme : La bonne aventure

Jean-François Delcamp : SI SI RE

Anonyme : Sur le pont d'Avignon

Johann Kaspar Mertz : Übungen im Wechsel – Anschlag. auf zwei Saiten

Patty & Mildred j. Hill : Good-morning to all

Dionisio Aguado : Leccion 5a

Anonyme : Lo, nous marchons sur un étroit chemin






In order to mark the beat yourself, you need to count the smallest rhythmic values out loud as you play, as indicated on the score: "1 e 2 e 3 e" ("1 and 2 and 3 and" in English)
Using a metronome is useful, but it is only a temporary crutch to lean on. You will benefit far more by counting the beats out loud as you play than by using a metronome. Internalizing the rhythm allows us in time to achieve both freedom and discipline when playing, that is, to be a musician.
If counting the smallest values out loud seems difficult, or very difficult, to you, it only means that you have to persevere, or persevere a lot more. Keep at it with determination until it becomes easy and natural for you. When, after having practised it long enough, this exercise of counting out loud while you play becomes easy, then you don't need to bother with it any more.
When you start working on a new piece, start by working very slowly, concentrating on precision. The essential thing is that you should play the music perfectly, that your rhythm should be precise, your sound well controlled, and your playing musical and expressive.
Speed will come with your new skills acquired in time through work. You should not worry about speed when tackling a new piece. At the beginning, such a preoccupation would only hinder you in your progress. It is only once you have mastered the piece within the comfort of a slow tempo, that you can start to think about playing progressively faster until finally you reach the right tempo.



You can memorize different tempi (tempos) by mentally associating each one with a tune you have learnt by heart. Learn a suitable tune for each tempo. Begin with Good-morning to all (the same tune as Happy Birthday) for the tempo of 120 (beats per minute).


I ask you first to work on all these exercises and tunes for a week and then to upload your recordings of:
Jean-François Delcamp : SI SI RE
Anonyme : Good-morning to all
Dionisio Aguado : Leccion 5a
Anonyme : Lo, nous marchons sur un étroit chemin




I thank Geoff (GeoffB) who has helped in the translation of my lessons into English.


Jean-François

---

Exam qualifying submissions:

SI SI RE
Good-morning to all
Leccion 5a
Lo, nous marchons sur un étroit chemin

Jim Stewart
SI SI RE
Good-morning to all
Leccion 5a
Lo, nous marchons sur un étroit chemin

Philip Polaski
SI SI RE
Good-morning to all
Leccion 5a
Lo, nous marchons sur un étroit chemin

Matt Bell
SI SI RE
Good-morning to all
Leccion 5a
Lo, nous marchons sur un étroit chemin

Todd Owenby
SI SI RE
Good-morning to all
Leccion 5a
Lo, nous marchons sur un étroit chemin

John.Nicholson
SI SI RE
Good-morning to all
Leccion 5a
Lo, nous marchons sur un étroit chemin

håvard.bergene
SI SI RE
Good-morning to all
Leccion 5a
Lo, nous marchons sur un étroit chemin

ShaneSingleton
SI SI RE
Good-morning to all
Leccion 5a
Lo, nous marchons sur un étroit chemin

Mark_Steed
SI SI RE
Good-morning to all
Leccion 5a
Lo, nous marchons sur un étroit chemin

Vincent_Pera
SI SI RE
Good-morning to all
Leccion 5a
Lo, nous marchons sur un étroit chemin

RaphaelPazos
SI SI RE
Good-morning to all
Leccion 5a
Lo, nous marchons sur un étroit chemin
:( + ♫ = :)

Jim Stewart

Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 03

Post by Jim Stewart » Thu Nov 10, 2011 2:48 pm

Here is lesson 3 requirements. I posted two tries at Leccion 5a. It is much easier to play of course if one doesn't change the 3 and 4 fingers on the left hand. Still more work required to get the third and fourth fingers smooth. I am also trying to understand why M. Delcamp switches fingers other than the dexterity exercise. I realize that as we go forward such a switch will be necessary for playing more complex pieces but am not sure, when I start playing a piece, how I know to make the decision to use the third or fourth fingers at the beginning.

Happy to report that, after getting some "spider crawl" exercises from another web site and practicing them each day that my left thumb is starting to want to be behind the neck instead of peaking over the top. As a result, I feel a little more relaxed fingering the strings.
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Goran Penic
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Location: Zagreb, Croatia

Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 03

Post by Goran Penic » Thu Nov 10, 2011 5:01 pm

Jim, very good, :bravo:
Guitar: Mirko Hotko 1989
Strings: D'Addario EJ46TT Pro Arte Dynacore Hard Tension
Recorder: Olympus LS-20M

Todd Owenby

Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 03

Post by Todd Owenby » Fri Nov 11, 2011 12:50 am

Jim:

They sounded great! Bravo! Lesson 5 is a bit tricky for me, too...it's the only reason I haven't posted yet!

The only real improvement I might suggest would be a tad more string muting, with the exception of Nous Marchons.

As for the changing of fingers 3 and 4, I've wondered the same thing. He's likely attempting to develop strength and dexterity in both fingers.

Cheers and keep up the good work!

-todd

RachelVoe

Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 03

Post by RachelVoe » Fri Nov 11, 2011 1:42 am

Jim,
NIcely done! I am still working on these pieces and have admiration for how well you did them...especially the damping of the strings on "Si Si Re". Hope to post mine soon.

P.S. How do you keep your other strings from vibrating? Mine vibrate even when I haven't plucked them. :?

Jim Stewart

Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 03

Post by Jim Stewart » Sat Nov 12, 2011 2:42 am

Thanks for the feedback everyone. I look forward to hearing you play.

On the vibrating strings - I find that happens a lot when I first start to play a piece. Sometimes I can live with it if it sounds like it is making a fuller tone and sometimes I can lay my finger on the offending string if it is close. But, I don't reach for it. So far, for me, there is no scientific method but, if the vibration is a harmonic of what I am playing then usually it sounds OK.

One thing I do regularly now is go back to the first exercise in D01 and work my way through them all again trying to be more careful on fingering, damping and picking the strings more accurately. I am also working on bridging my fingers with my thumb behind the neck and going back to the easier pieces allows me to get my hand in a better position. I find I can do that review in about 30 minutes and it is worth the time every few days. That has also had a positive effect on my speed.

When I feel good about a song I set up M. Delcamp's videos of the song and try to play along with him 4 or 5 times. He seems to always do it the right way so it is a good way to get the timing and the phrasing down. I usually can stay up after 4-5 play through's. My next step is to tape myself playing along to see if I am actually playing it well.
Last edited by Jim Stewart on Sat Nov 12, 2011 4:43 pm, edited 1 time in total.

Philip Polaski

Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 03

Post by Philip Polaski » Sat Nov 12, 2011 7:57 am

Jim,

Very good playing. I really enjoyed listening to your songs. I read that you play along with Mr. Delcamp videos. That's fantastic, as it's an excellent way to learn. :bravo: :bravo: :bravo:

Philip Polaski

Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 03

Post by Philip Polaski » Fri Nov 18, 2011 2:24 am

Thanks for posting your work Jim as it got me to record and post my own work. I made some coffee after work and did some recording. It's a bit rough but I can definitely see the progress over the last two months.

As always comments are always welcome.

Good Morning

[media]https://youtu.be/S0XStVhB4Ek[/media]

Leccion 5a

[media]https://youtu.be/ZI9eRxYDYfA[/media]

Nous Marchons

[media]https://youtu.be/bF-Y2-K67OE[/media]

Si Si Re

[media]https://youtu.be/xpS5m-gU5qY[/media]

Thank You for your time.

Philip

Matt Bell

Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 03

Post by Matt Bell » Sat Nov 19, 2011 5:29 am

Nicely done to the both of you. I can see the progress in both of your postings. I am a little behind in posting but will catch up shortly.

Jim Stewart

Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 03

Post by Jim Stewart » Tue Nov 22, 2011 3:43 pm

Well done, Philip.

You have taken on the challenge of counting out loud which I have not done yet. I am too busy reading music. Keeping the beat is coming although we all have fingering problems at this stage.

I just finished my weekly review of all of the songs to date and find I get a little more positive each time in terms of finger placement and dampening. Your thumb position is about where mine ends up after a few bars, just bending over the neck. Today was the first day I could actually say that my thumb was in the right place when I reviewed Lessons 1 and 2. I am now working on getting my fingers more upright like yours to be able to move them quicker. I look forward to watching you improve as we move through the lessons.

RachelVoe

Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 03

Post by RachelVoe » Mon Nov 28, 2011 11:28 pm

Hi all,

Here is my first video! It's not great - lots of buzzing etc. But I wanted you to know that I am working on the assignments. Feel welcome to give me feedback.

Rachel
Twinkle.wmv



P.S. I am having some difficulties in transferring between using my "p" finger to the "m" of "i" fingers...any help?
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Goran Penic
Posts: 713
Joined: Thu Jul 21, 2011 4:36 pm
Location: Zagreb, Croatia

Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 03

Post by Goran Penic » Wed Nov 30, 2011 12:16 am

RachelVoe wrote:...
P.S. I am having some difficulties in transferring between using my "p" finger to the "m" of "i" fingers...any help?
You have two possible solutions.
The first is that you play as Mr. Delcamp using i and m fingers on all strings.
The second is that you keep your thumb on the bass string you're playing and play the higher strings with i and m.
Your mistake is that you elevate your thumb at 6 string when you go to play with your i and m fingers.

Anyway very well played. Good posture. :bravo:
Guitar: Mirko Hotko 1989
Strings: D'Addario EJ46TT Pro Arte Dynacore Hard Tension
Recorder: Olympus LS-20M

Matt Bell

Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 03

Post by Matt Bell » Sun Dec 04, 2011 6:06 pm

[media]https://youtu.be/Uf3rMZM8wRs[/media]
[media]https://youtu.be/vTWUeocC13k[/media]
[media]https://youtu.be/CbJIUDiwBWA[/media]
[media]https://youtu.be/LQaNyuY2jy4[/media]

Here are my lessons. I know it seems like my thumb is peeking over but I assure you its the angle and not the thumb as I have been concentrating on not doing this. Not as fluid as I would have liked but then again not as bad as it has been.

Todd Owenby

Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 03

Post by Todd Owenby » Wed Dec 07, 2011 7:12 pm

M:

Everything sounds/looks great! You might try playing the last piece as Delcamp notated to help delvelop the rest stroke with your thumb (p). Cheers!

-todd

Todd Owenby

Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 03

Post by Todd Owenby » Wed Dec 07, 2011 7:20 pm

We were in the process of moving during the past few weeks. So, I FINALLY had time to finish recording the lessons.

Aguado's piece involves a fair amount (for me) of string crossing. It took a bit to get it up to the notated tempo.

Again, I apologize in advance for the horrible sound quality and look forward to your critiques!

[media]https://youtu.be/Tf9j48FWv30[/media]

[media]https://youtu.be/JRrGS0PqbEQ[/media]

[media]https://youtu.be/vV4hhFNu2F8[/media]

[media]https://youtu.be/7l-aO1y8iyo[/media]

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