D04 Classical guitar lesson 05

Archive of on-line classical guitar lessons from previous years.
Forum rules
The classical guitar lessons are free. They are aimed at the isolated amateur who does not have access to a teacher. To join the class, apply for registration into the students group.

PDF, MP3, Vidéos, Lessons : Level D01 - Level D02 - Level D03 - Level D04 - Level D05 - Level D06 - Level D07 - Level D08 - Level D09 - Level D10 - Level D11 - Level D12.
User avatar
Jean-François Delcamp
Administrator
Administrator
Posts: 4493
Joined: Sun May 30, 2004 7:49 pm
Location: Brest, France

D04 Classical guitar lesson 05

Post by Jean-François Delcamp » Tue Jan 17, 2012 10:25 am

Hello everyone,
Please start by downloading the new version of volume D04 that I updated today.
If you are new to the course, please read this message to familiarize yourself with the conditions for participating in the lessons. You should also read the first message in lesson 1, where you will find advice on how to make the most of your study time and on the methods of practising that I recommend.




We are now going to work on a series of exercises:
- page 114 numbers 17, 18, 19 - Jean-François DELCAMP (1956) GAMMES - SCALE - SCALES - ESCALAS
The following videos correspond to numbers 17, 18 and 19 on page 114. Concentrate your practice on the passages highlighted in yellow, working to perfect the technique of position-shifting up and down the neck.




- page 124 Delcamp, Jean-François ARPÈGES - ARPEGGI - ARPEGGIOS – ARPEGIOS





Finally we'll look at 5 pieces, pages 22, 54, 55, 56, 57, 78, 79 and 88.
- page 22 Dowland, John Mistris Winters Jumpe
Here we have a "jig". 6/8 time has two beats to the bar. The strong beats are on the first and fourth quaver (eighth note). The phrase structure (see previous lessons) is of 4 bars. Bars 5 to 8 are a division (see lesson D04 n°3) on bars 1 to 4. The 3rd phrase finishes in bar 12 with a half cadence (imperfect cadence), that is one ending on the dominant. The piece concludes with a slightly modified repetition of bars 1 and 2.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cadence_(music%29#Half_cadence




- page 54, 55 Sor, Fernando Exercice opus 35 n°22, en si mineur, Segovia n°5
The phrase structure is of 8 bars. This study is a polyphonic composition in three voices. At the beginning we have the impression of hearing just a single voice. In the first section, the times when you play two notes together are rare: the 1st beat of bars 1 and 9, and the 3rd beat of bar 13.
The polyphony is only fully expressed from bar 25, when the range of pitch (also known as ambitus or compass *) becomes wider and the bass notes start to appear on the first beat of the bar.

The rest stroke is well suited to bringing out the melody (the upper voice). Use the free stroke to play the accompaniment. In this study, from the beginning to bar 24, the melody takes place within a narrow range (a fifth). This narrow range calls for a low volume (mezzo piano or mezzo forte). From bar 25, the range becomes wider, calling for the fullest sound from the guitar, with an assertive volume (forte). From bar 33, go back to the mp or mf level. From bar 41 to the end, the range becomes wider again, so go back to a more powerful volume. Reduce the volume of the last two bars gradually to conclude the study mezzo piano.




- page 56, 57 Sor, Fernando Valse opus 51 n°3
The phrase structure is of 8 bars. In this waltz, the melody of the first section, in E minor, takes place within a narrow range. For this E minor section, I advise a restrained articulation: "non legato" or "mezzo staccato" or maybe "portato".
http://www.dolmetsch.com/musictheory21.htm#accent
The range becomes wider in the second section in E major. In this E major section, the guitar is required to give its fullest sound with an assertive volume. For this section I advise a legato articulation.




- page 78, 79 Paganini, Niccolò Perigoldino
There are many repetitions, so vary the tone colour to avoid monotony.
All the phrases start with an anacrusis (pick-up note or upbeat) on the 4th crotchet (quarter note). All the phrases end on the first crotchet (quarter note) of a bar.

The piece is in the key of A, and this key allows the 3 bass strings of the guitar to be used to their best effect: E (dominant) A (tonic) D (subdominant). Observe the precise length of the bass notes, and damp them by placing your thumb on the open string.




- page 88 Tárrega, Francisco Estudio, en mi minor
Another piece in three voices. Here again I recommend that you use rest stroke for the melody (upper voice). The right-hand fingering is based on the most classic principle: the ring finger plays the first string, the middle finger plays the second, and the index finger plays the third, while the thumb plays strings 4, 5 and 6. To practise this type of fingering, see the arpeggios of Mauro Guiliani, pages 130 and 131 of volume D04.
Mauro Giuliani was the first teacher to publish a systematic study of arpeggios (http://www.guitareclassiquedelcamp.com/ ... liani.html : Opus. 1 - Studio per la chitarra, Prima parte : 120 arpeggi).
I recommend that you practise a few arpeggios each day and change them regularly with the aim of studying all of them in two years. You can hear the mp3s of the 120 arpeggios recorded by Marco Cairone here: http://www.chitarraclassicadelcamp.com/ ... 32&t=25253 .





I ask you first to work on all these exercises and pieces for one week and then to post your recordings on the forum for:
- page 22 Dowland, John Mistris Winters Jumpe
- page 54, 55 Sor, Fernando Exercice opus 35 n°22, en si mineur, Segovia n°5
- page 88 Tárrega, Francisco Estudio, en mi minor


Good luck!

I thank Geoff (GeoffB) who has helped in the translation of my lessons into English.

Jean-François

---

Exam qualifying submissions:

Mistris Winters Jumpe
Exercice opus 35 n°22, en si mineur
Estudio, en mi minor

Jack Jarrett
Mistris Winters Jumpe
Exercice opus 35 n°22, en si mineur
Estudio, en mi minor

Giuseppe Gasparini
Mistris Winters Jumpe
Exercice opus 35 n°22, en si mineur
Estudio, en mi minor

Elías López Cruz
Mistris Winters Jumpe
Estudio, en mi minor

Jeremy Hickerson
Mistris Winters Jumpe
Exercice opus 35 n°22, en si mineur
Estudio, en mi minor

* ambitus, or compass, indicates the range of a melody, a voice or an instrument from the lowest to the highest note.
:( + ♫ = :)

User avatar
Giuseppe Gasparini
Student of the online lessons
Posts: 470
Joined: Sat Jul 30, 2011 2:28 pm
Location: Genova-Italia

Re: D04 Classical guitar lesson 05

Post by Giuseppe Gasparini » Tue Jan 17, 2012 5:42 pm

Hello, there is much to study, I feel already Tarrega canceled :bye: :discussion:
Last edited by Giuseppe Gasparini on Sun Jan 29, 2012 8:30 am, edited 1 time in total.

Jeremy Hickerson
Amateur luthier
Posts: 621
Joined: Tue Feb 03, 2009 5:20 am
Location: Salem, Oregon

Re: D04 Classical guitar lesson 05

Post by Jeremy Hickerson » Wed Jan 18, 2012 1:18 am

Nice job on the Tarrega, Giuseppe! This is a piece I have played before, as is the Sor Study in B minor. Very good left hand and arm posture, not squeezing but pressing lightly down from on top of the strings. This reminds me of the exercise I was shown once where you don't use the left hand thumb (it never touches the neck), as a means of learning this posture - you do it very well and I'm sure that is one of the reasons why your playing seems so effortless.
Jeremy

Guitarras: 1973 Manouk Papazian (Spruce/Morado), two I have built, and an old Telesforo Julve parlor size

Michael Collings
Posts: 212
Joined: Tue Mar 03, 2009 3:58 pm
Location: Sylva, North Carolina

Re: D04 Classical guitar lesson 05

Post by Michael Collings » Wed Jan 18, 2012 3:17 am

Very nice Tarrega Giuseppe. :casque:

User avatar
Giuseppe Gasparini
Student of the online lessons
Posts: 470
Joined: Sat Jul 30, 2011 2:28 pm
Location: Genova-Italia

Re: D04 Classical guitar lesson 05

Post by Giuseppe Gasparini » Thu Jan 19, 2012 4:34 pm

[media]https://youtu.be/DZPn7ZnSZII[/media]Hello everyone, I feel even Sor. :bye: :discussion:

User avatar
Goran Penic
Posts: 713
Joined: Thu Jul 21, 2011 4:36 pm
Location: Zagreb, Croatia

Re: D04 Classical guitar lesson 05

Post by Goran Penic » Fri Jan 20, 2012 1:12 am

:bravo: Giuseppe. Very nice performance :casque:
Guitar: Mirko Hotko 1989
Strings: D'Addario EJ46TT Pro Arte Dynacore Hard Tension
Recorder: Olympus LS-20M

User avatar
Giuseppe Gasparini
Student of the online lessons
Posts: 470
Joined: Sat Jul 30, 2011 2:28 pm
Location: Genova-Italia

Re: D04 Classical guitar lesson 05

Post by Giuseppe Gasparini » Fri Jan 20, 2012 1:54 pm

Goran :merci: :merci: :bye:

Jeremy Hickerson
Amateur luthier
Posts: 621
Joined: Tue Feb 03, 2009 5:20 am
Location: Salem, Oregon

Re: D04 Classical guitar lesson 05

Post by Jeremy Hickerson » Fri Jan 20, 2012 5:08 pm

Very nice Giuseppe! I once had a very good guitarist tell me that this study was the most beautiful of the Sor studies. I have some other personal favorites, but this one grows on me.
Jeremy

Guitarras: 1973 Manouk Papazian (Spruce/Morado), two I have built, and an old Telesforo Julve parlor size

Jack Jarrett

Re: D04 Classical guitar lesson 05

Post by Jack Jarrett » Tue Jan 24, 2012 3:05 pm

NIce Giuseppi, as usual!

Here are a couple of 1st attempts of the lesson.
[media]https://youtu.be/fopPnxmRLxU[/media]
I'm strugggling to remember the notes as camera freeze up strikes once again! If my mind goes blank in front of a camera, what would happen in front of people? :oops:



[media]https://youtu.be/n1jOhD5ZsAI[/media]
[media]https://youtu.be/LQrA96PXMq0[/media]
Still a long way to go!

Thanks for viewing!

User avatar
Giuseppe Gasparini
Student of the online lessons
Posts: 470
Joined: Sat Jul 30, 2011 2:28 pm
Location: Genova-Italia

Re: D04 Classical guitar lesson 05

Post by Giuseppe Gasparini » Tue Jan 24, 2012 3:59 pm

Bravo Jack, the better the lesson. :bye: :bravo: :bravo: :bravo:

Jeremy Hickerson
Amateur luthier
Posts: 621
Joined: Tue Feb 03, 2009 5:20 am
Location: Salem, Oregon

Re: D04 Classical guitar lesson 05

Post by Jeremy Hickerson » Tue Jan 24, 2012 11:49 pm

Jack, thanks to our new local Guitar Society in Salem (Oregon) I get a regular chance (once a month) to play classical pieces for an audience; and one of my biggest problems is going blank on parts of the piece. I think it is a matter of focus, it's much harder for me to focus in this situation. I have been told that the way to get better at it is to keep doing it.

I can say that it helps to have some "higher level" thing to remember other than just what fret and string your left hand 2nd finger is on for a given note: I.e. it's easier to remember if you can put it in terms like

"I'm playing the 3rd of an A chord here" or something like that. Even better is to remember the context, say the chord progression ("I just played a D chord and now I'm going to the A (which is the V chord, then back to the I chord (D) again). If the context is a familiar pattern or chord progression, then it makes sense and it's easy to remember. Like the difference between remembering a word and a string of random digits. Knowing the big picture of what's going on musically helps. Problem is, I usually come to this after I've made the mistake and am vowing not to do that again!

Last night I played "Scarborough Fair" and Novelette from memory at the society. Novelette went pretty well and it helped me to remember the fact that the open GB accompaniment chord at the beginning turns into an AB (keeping the B constant) when the F is the bass note, and that the CCC-B F#F#F#-E BBBA... pattern played in the bass notes the first time through is transferred to the treble the 2nd time. In Scarborough Fair I couldn't for the life of me come up with the right notes for the 3rd measure of the melody, I sort of faked something that was pretty bad the first time and better on the repeat but still not quite right. Of course thinking about it now I know that it's the 3rd of a G chord (pretending that the capo is the nut) going to the suspended note (C), a natural easy folk-guitar kind of thing, and that the chord progression moves from Am to G back to Am. Wish I had thought about this before I played it, but I didn't think I needed to because I never had a problem remembering this when playing it at home!
Jeremy

Guitarras: 1973 Manouk Papazian (Spruce/Morado), two I have built, and an old Telesforo Julve parlor size

Jack Jarrett

Re: D04 Classical guitar lesson 05

Post by Jack Jarrett » Wed Jan 25, 2012 3:26 am

Jeremy, That is great that you have that opportunity! I really need to work on the performance aspect, but have limited opportunity. My poor wife is subjected to my playing in the background constantly, and it isn't something I've asked her to do often, that is to listen to me. I have some friends that keep saying they want to hear me play, but I've yet to summon the courage as I am still working on a repertoire. I do have a few pieces I could do, and will probably try the invite for dinner followed by a quick recital, just to get my feet wet. I'm beginning to feel like we are learning some tunes that are worthy of performing.
What I really was hoping was to share the stress with others, and do some ensemble stuff, but the time is just too limited and I've been unable to secure anyone to do that with.It doesn't seem as frightening when there are others to help hide our flubs! I envy your opportunity, as our Classical guitar society doesn't seem to offer that sort of thing. It definitely would be great, and maybe I will have to push the organization a little harder to get something like that going.
Thanks for the feedback.

Jeremy Hickerson
Amateur luthier
Posts: 621
Joined: Tue Feb 03, 2009 5:20 am
Location: Salem, Oregon

Re: D04 Classical guitar lesson 05

Post by Jeremy Hickerson » Wed Jan 25, 2012 9:48 pm

So you do have a society - that's good at least! Ours has all sorts of styles, not necessarily classical. There are 2 of us that regularly play classical pieces, one is the great Jim Greeninger (check out his youtube site he is awesome, and just happens to live in Salem), the other is me. We have a lot of fingerstyle of various sorts, jazz, pop, country, and some flat picking and singing too - all good. We have featured performers that have really been great, again from a variety of styles. Jim was one of them and every meeting his stuff is a treat.
Jeremy

Guitarras: 1973 Manouk Papazian (Spruce/Morado), two I have built, and an old Telesforo Julve parlor size

User avatar
Giuseppe Gasparini
Student of the online lessons
Posts: 470
Joined: Sat Jul 30, 2011 2:28 pm
Location: Genova-Italia

Re: D04 Classical guitar lesson 05

Post by Giuseppe Gasparini » Thu Jan 26, 2012 6:10 pm

[media]https://youtu.be/8qlIstndeaM[/media][media]https://youtu.be/6g-BvuuZr8E[/media]Hello, I post Dowland and Tarrega :bye: :discussion:

Jack Jarrett

Re: D04 Classical guitar lesson 05

Post by Jack Jarrett » Fri Jan 27, 2012 4:28 am

Giuseppi, fluid and smooth Tarrega.Beautiful piece.Perhaps more tonal variety in Mistress Winters Jumpe, but very nice nonetheless. :casque:
Here is my try at the Jumpe
[media]https://youtu.be/emnNgcuz64E[/media]

Return to “Classical guitar lessons archive”