D02 Classical guitar lesson 02

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Jean-François Delcamp
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D02 Classical guitar lesson 02

Post by Jean-François Delcamp » Mon Sep 30, 2013 4:05 pm

Hello everyone,
Please start by downloading the latest version of volume D02.
If you are new to the course, please read this message to familiarize yourself with the conditions for participating in the lessons. You should also read the first message in lesson 1, where you will find advice on how to make the most of your study time and on the methods of practising that I recommend.

Today, we're going to work on a series of exercises:
- page 72 ex. 1, 2 & 3.
In these right hand exercises, you will work on getting a smooth join between notes, that is to say that you will end one or more notes at the exact moment that you start the following note (or notes).





- page 84 ex. 37 to 41.
Exercises 37 to 40 are for the fingers of the right hand. The (x) sign indicates that the right hand finger is resting on the string (and damping it). Exercise 41 is for the left hand: lean the left hand finger over to damp the adjacent string at the same time as you play the new note.




- page 73 exercise 6.
Play this left-hand exercise trying to leave your fingers in place on the strings as long as you can, as I show you in the following video. If the stretches between your fingers feel too much for you, you can make it easier for the left hand by using a capo so that you play on the higher frets which are closer together and your fingers will not have to stretch so far apart. Avoid bending your left wrist, as this not only hurts, but also hinders the mobility of your fingers. Aim for the position (of the guitar neck, your elbow and your shoulder) which will allow you to play without bending your left wrist, as shown in the following video. You will be able to play this exercise more effectively if you place your left thumb below your ring finger, i.e. below the third fret.


- page 74 Chromatic scale
Play this scale trying to leave your fingers on the strings as long as possible, as shown in this video. You will be able to play this exercise more effectively if you place your left thumb below your ring finger, i.e. below the third fret.





Next, we will be working on two pieces with a phrase structure of 4 bars. Phrase structure is the division of the larger musical phrase into parts of equal length, with the most common division being into sections of 4 bars. This division is linked not only to walking, but also to dance, poetry and singing.



- page 9 Fernando SOR (1778-1839) LEÇON IV opus 60
In order to mark the beat yourself, you need to count the smallest rhythmic values out loud as you play, as indicated on the score: "1 e 2 e 3 e 4 e 5 e 6 e" ("1 and 2 and 3 and 4 and 5 and 6" in English)

Using a metronome is useful, but it is only a temporary crutch to lean on. You will benefit far more by counting the beats out loud as you play than by using a metronome. Internalizing the rhythm allows us in time to achieve both freedom and discipline when playing, that is, to be a musician.
If counting the smallest values out loud seems difficult, or very difficult, to you, it only means that you have to persevere, or persevere a lot more. Keep at it with determination until it becomes easy and natural for you. When, after having practised it long enough, this exercise of counting out loud while you play becomes easy, then you don't need to bother with it any more.



When you start working on a new piece, start by working very slowly, concentrating on precision. The essential thing is that you should play the music perfectly, that your rhythm should be precise, your sound well controlled, and your playing musical and expressive.
Speed will come with your new skills acquired in time through work. You should not worry about speed when tackling a new piece. At the beginning, such a preoccupation would only hinder you in your progress. It is only once you have mastered the piece within the comfort of a slow tempo, that you can start to think about playing progressively faster until finally you reach the right tempo.

- pages 12-13 Jean-François DELCAMP (1956) MALAGUEÑA
To mark the beat for yourself, count the beats out loud as you play, as indicated on the score (1 e 2 e 3 e)
i.e. ("1 and 2 and 3 and").



I ask you first to work on all these exercises and pieces for one week and then to post your recordings on the forum for:
- exercice number 6 on page 73
- exercice number 40 on page 84,
- MALAGUEÑA on pages 12 and 13.


The work I'm asking of you is difficult and requires you to be both organized and disciplined. It is certain that you will struggle to get your fingers to perform the exact movements required for the exercises. In order to succeed in this, you need to make the same movements several dozen times daily. The goal of these exercises is to strengthen and stretch your finger muscles, to make your fingers stronger and more agile. Put in plenty of work, every day, on the difficult parts, focus on them and play the easy parts only occasionally.
To get the best out of your practice time, split it up into 15 minute sessions, and leave your hands to rest for at least 30 minutes between sessions. If your hands hurt, leave them to rest for an hour, the time it takes your body to eliminate the lactic acid in your muscles, which is the main cause of muscle pain.


Good luck!


I thank Charles (Charlesoln) and Geoff (GeoffB) who have helped in the translation of my lessons into English.

Jean-François

---

Exam qualifying submissions:

exercice number 6
exercice number 40
MALAGUEÑA

Stefan Srećković
exercice number 6
exercice number 40
MALAGUEÑA

Beatriz Martin
exercice number 6
exercice number 40
MALAGUEÑA

WilliamTee
exercice number 6
exercice number 40
MALAGUEÑA

Halil Akaydin
exercice number 6
exercice number 40
MALAGUEÑA

Satyajit Kadle
exercice number 6
exercice number 40
MALAGUEÑA

Laura Staats
exercice number 6
exercice number 40
MALAGUEÑA

Haris Karachristianidis
exercice number 6
exercice number 40
MALAGUEÑA
:( + ♫ = :)

Beatriz Martin

Re: D02 Classical guitar lesson 02

Post by Beatriz Martin » Wed Oct 02, 2013 12:09 am

Ok, I started to play some of these videos last weeks. Exercice 6 extension, gamme chromatique 8 and some parts of Malagueña bars 17 to 24 give me shoulder pain. What I do is I play them a couple of times, rest shake my shoulder for a little and play again, or I wait and play later that day if I can. I have been checking my posture, I think I am sitting properly, I found a comfy sitting posture about a month ago, but these exercices give me shoulder pain. Anyways, I wanted to share this with you in case you feel the same, I hope it is just something temporarily.

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CarlWestman
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Re: D02 Classical guitar lesson 02

Post by CarlWestman » Wed Oct 02, 2013 5:46 pm

For me the ex. 6 soreness was in the forearm up through the fingers (fretting side). Not horribly hard to do, but the stretching and tension required was very tiring.

The boxed sections of 38-39 on p. 84 gave me fits - even with all the time in the world, it's very hard to keep m planted while plucking with a and i.

Malaguena looks tough but it has some patterns. Actually quite a few patterns, some kind of unusual, so it'll take some work. But I love the sound. I am not crazy about the Sor piece at all. For whatever reason I seldom like his stuff. It often seems heavy on the technical, at the expense of pleasant melody. Just my taste.

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Marko Räsänen
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Re: D02 Classical guitar lesson 02

Post by Marko Räsänen » Wed Oct 02, 2013 6:20 pm

CarlWestman wrote:The boxed sections of 38-39 on p. 84 gave me fits - even with all the time in the world, it's very hard to keep m planted while plucking with a and i.
That's one of the most useful right hand exercises I've ever had the pleasure to struggle with. Easily worth every hour you keep at it, although it really starts to pay off in D04 where you begin to need a-m independence for damping and other purposes. You'll revisit it in the first lessons of years 3 - 5.
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Beatriz Martin

Re: D02 Classical guitar lesson 02

Post by Beatriz Martin » Thu Oct 03, 2013 3:31 am

I don't have time to practice Sor right now, I will concentrate on Malagueña which is what we have to post. Sor pieces haven't been very enjoyable to play, not catchy. I will practice it for a couple of days after I finish with Malagueña.

Stefan Srećković

Re: D02 Classical guitar lesson 02

Post by Stefan Srećković » Thu Oct 03, 2013 4:26 pm

Having finally polished Malaguena I can give one obvious tip: METRONOME people, use it! :cafe:

Especially when working on bars 37->44. It took me two hours spread across two days to go from 45 bpm to 135 bpm to get these notes smooth and up to speed.

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CarlWestman
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Re: D02 Classical guitar lesson 02

Post by CarlWestman » Thu Oct 03, 2013 10:58 pm

Stefan delivers good advice once again. And I'm proud to be a charter member of the 45 bpm club! (Tomorrow - 50?) :D

I am not keen on metronomes in much the same way I am not keen on eating my vegetables. But that said, they are very useful for this passage because many of the notes are of the same duration. So you can just build up speed on a particular run of 8th notes.

One question though - in measure 38, why should you bother to change your fretting finger from 1 to 2 for that last C note? It's not like you need it to be there for the next measure.

Stefan Srećković

Re: D02 Classical guitar lesson 02

Post by Stefan Srećković » Thu Oct 03, 2013 11:40 pm

An adequate question. I wondered the same. Can't see any logical reasoning behind it.

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GeoffB
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Re: D02 Classical guitar lesson 02

Post by GeoffB » Thu Oct 03, 2013 11:57 pm

Hi Carl, I don't normally have time to read these threads but happened to see your question, and the answer, as I see it, is to allow you to prepare the first finger for the F that starts the next bar. Otherwise, your first finger would have to jump across from the second string to the sixth string between bars, and that leads to an unpleasant gap in the sound. By using the second finger for the last C, you can fret the next F and keep your second finger on the C until just after you've played the F, giving a smooth, legato sound. For the same reason, the fingers used for the A and E immediately before that C are 2 and 3, rather than the more natural 3 and 2. That allows you to move the 2 from the A to the C while still holding down the E, again to give a legato sound.

Geoff
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Beatriz Martin

Re: D02 Classical guitar lesson 02

Post by Beatriz Martin » Fri Oct 04, 2013 3:02 am

I tried what Geoff said before but didn't see it easier, but it is very interesting to train your fingers like that.

I have a hard time with the left hand fingers when doing the Es in bars 37, 38. In bar 37, the first E I do it with the p as it says there. Then the second E same bar I tend to use the index I dont know why. Then bar 38 I am using the index again but it doesn't feel right and I make mistakes. Are you using the p for all Es?

Beatriz Martin

Re: D02 Classical guitar lesson 02

Post by Beatriz Martin » Fri Oct 04, 2013 3:05 am

Stefan Srećković wrote:Having finally polished Malaguena I can give one obvious tip: METRONOME people, use it! :cafe:

Especially when working on bars 37->44. It took me two hours spread across two days to go from 45 bpm to 135 bpm to get these notes smooth and up to speed.
Wow, just two hours, that was pretty good Stefan :lol:

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LindaWoodford
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Re: D02 Classical guitar lesson 02

Post by LindaWoodford » Fri Oct 04, 2013 6:42 am

Es in bars 37, 38. In bar 37, the first E I do it with the p as it says there. Then the second E same bar I tend to use the index I dont know why. Then bar 38 I am using the index again but it doesn't feel right and I make mistakes. Are you using the p for all Es?
Hi Beatriz, and all,

I remember this piece well from when I did it last year. As a quick answer to Beatriz's question, I think I also used "i" for the second E in bar 37 and also the one in bar 38. However, I think there are two options here: either pamia, or pmipm. What I think is important, is that the fingers flow over the strings sequentially, without having to cross, and that there is an efficient pattern that can be applied to the similar passages without thinking too much.

With this piece, I found it very important to really sort out the most efficient left and right hand fingering at the beginning, when practicing very very slowly. The example that Geoff explained for the left hand is a very good one. It might not seem to be so important when you are practicing slowly, because you have plenty of time to bring the fingers into position, but as soon as you start to increase the tempo, you will stumble if you haven't been practicing the most efficient fingering.

I find the metronome to be very useful for specific things. One is to use it fairly slowly to run through a piece once and find out which parts need to be isolated and practiced on their own. The other is for increasing the overall tempo in an even way - but ONLY after I have worked out the technique and fingering, otherwise you just practice bad habits or practice random attempts, which does no good at all. After that, I put the metronome away, because if you use it too much, you start sounding like a robot. I find it much nicer to listen to music that breathes and flows in it's own way.

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CarlWestman
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Re: D02 Classical guitar lesson 02

Post by CarlWestman » Fri Oct 04, 2013 10:11 pm

GeoffB wrote:Hi Carl, I don't normally have time to read these threads but happened to see your question, and the answer, as I see it, is to allow you to prepare the first finger for the F that starts the next bar. Otherwise, your first finger would have to jump across from the second string to the sixth string between bars, and that leads to an unpleasant gap in the sound. By using the second finger for the last C, you can fret the next F and keep your second finger on the C until just after you've played the F, giving a smooth, legato sound. For the same reason, the fingers used for the A and E immediately before that C are 2 and 3, rather than the more natural 3 and 2. That allows you to move the 2 from the A to the C while still holding down the E, again to give a legato sound.

Geoff
Thank you, Geoff. As I practiced today I realized that one could also use fingers 2,3,4 in that measure 38, leaving 1 free to ready itself for F#. It also involves less finger crowding for strings 3 and 4, since the pinky is small. Just a thought -

Carl

Stefan Srećković

Re: D02 Classical guitar lesson 02

Post by Stefan Srećković » Fri Oct 04, 2013 10:14 pm

You end up fingering an A minor in an odd way :D

Stefan Srećković

Re: D02 Classical guitar lesson 02

Post by Stefan Srećković » Sat Oct 05, 2013 2:22 pm

[media]https://youtu.be/Y1EAeqYI08E[/media]
[media]https://youtu.be/9ix0PNZMl_E[/media]
[media]https://youtu.be/2DeC1gNjPD0[/media]

Malaguena was particularly challenging. I think I put in about ~6 hours practicing it!

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