D02 Classical guitar lesson 07

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Satyajit Kadle
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Re: D02 Classical guitar lesson 07

Post by Satyajit Kadle » Fri Feb 14, 2014 11:45 am

Hello friends. Looks like I've got lots of catching up to do... game, lessons etc. :roll:

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CarlWestman
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Re: D02 Classical guitar lesson 07

Post by CarlWestman » Fri Feb 14, 2014 9:43 pm

William - I'm glad you pointed that out, because I would have missed it too. I'm used to seeing those asterisks where we need to damp, and they're mostly absent from the sheet music for this piece. But thanks to you, I just did notice that the bass notes are supposed to be at rest after they ring for a quarter note duration. Ugh! Just as I was bringing up my speed! But it's still early I guess.

Laura - Nicely played; I enjoyed your improv2 - you really seemed to be grooving at the end! Funny story about the Kenny Hill guitar.
William - that D02 game sounds really good! Wow, I should revisit it, but I wonder how long it will take me to pick it all up again. I suppose some of it was re-written, right? Last I saw Stefan was going to go back and move some things around. On Ecossaise, one small missed note around 0:36 of which you are likely aware. Do you play with nails? It certainly sounds that way. Good use of rubato, though the timing seemed slightly uneven at times. A bit fast (briefly) at 0:16.
Halil - well-played. Slightly slow but very steady. A little twangy. This particular piece did not seem to soften as much as other pieces by playing the RH closer to the fretboard.

I've been having a little difficulty getting a good sound out of that first pull-off. I don't know if it's the crowded fingers, or my LH position. I recently moved my LH position so that my LH nails were more parallel to the strings, rather than angled. That seems to help a little in terms of getting more out of the very limited pull I can muster. Does that make sense to anyone? Also, my pinkie hammer-on is weak, when I hit it at all (about 2/3 of the time). Suggestions? Seems to go better when I hit it orthogonally to the fretboard, with the tip rather than the pad.

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Marko Räsänen
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Re: D02 Classical guitar lesson 07

Post by Marko Räsänen » Sat Feb 15, 2014 3:12 pm

Carl, I'm going to give you some tips for pull-offs and hammer-ons, but they're based on your slur video from the previous lesson, so some of that might not be relevant / useful anymore.

Pull-offs: For a good tone, the most important thing is that your left hand fingernail does not touch the string, but rather the string is played with the calloused tip of the finger. For a decent volume, the fingertip must be very close to orthogonal to fretboard, and pulled off practically sideways straight towards the next string, as opposed to away from the fretboard. For these two things to happen at the same time, your fingernail must be as short as you can practically file it (not as short as it will hurt though), and your callous must be hard enough to have enough friction to grip the string. Pull-offs feeling awkward, or sounding bad because the nail touches the string as you pull the finger aside is usually the first sign for me that I need to file down my left hand nails.

For the callouses to grow, you need to play a lot, and you specifically need to fret the wound strings. Unfortunately most of the notes played on wound bass strings during the first few years of lessons are open strings, so the callouses won't grow very quickly during the practice. That's one reason to play the scales and especially on bass strings.

Hammer-ons: Volume equals force. Force equals mass times acceleration (or rather deceleration when the finger meets the string, which meets the fret). To maximize deceleration, you need as high velocity as you can get. How do you get speed? By starting the hammer-on further away from the fretboard. It's harder to be accurate when starting the hammering motion farther away, though. Also it's important to realize that it's the impact speed that counts, not how hard do you keep pressing the string after the impact, so you need to time the use of force right, so that it translates to velocity.

Mass is constant, right? No, it's not. Pinkie is the most lightweight finger of the all, but fortunately it lies on the edge of the hand. This means that by rotating the hand from the elbow and very slightly arching your wrist at the same time as you hammer-on the pinkie, you'll get the mass of whole pinkie-side of the hand slammed against the string. In Ecossaise you'll get the whole benefit of this technique, because your other fingers aren't fretting anything at that time, so your hand is completely free to rotate. But even if the other fingers were fretted, you still get huge benefit from employing the muscles in your hand and forearm for the hammer-on. The movement would just be more restricted.

What about accuracy? For the hand rotation to work you'll need a pivot point. Anchor the underside of the guitar neck against the side of segment immediate to big knuckle of your index finger, so that the hand is free to rotate around that point. It'll take some experimentation to find the correct spot, but once you'll do, you'll hit the string every time. And you'll hit it hard. The score says piano, so you'll actually need to limit the force, or the hammered-on note will sound too loud relative to other notes. It's a knack, and you just need to practice it until you get it.

Hopefully this helps you and possibly others as well!
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Stefan Srećković

Re: D02 Classical guitar lesson 07

Post by Stefan Srećković » Sun Feb 16, 2014 1:38 pm

Some very useful tips right there. Take notes everyone! This one's going in the book.

Beatriz Martin

Re: D02 Classical guitar lesson 07

Post by Beatriz Martin » Sun Feb 16, 2014 10:50 pm

:bravo: Halil, Laura and William, I think your playing was excellent, I didn't notice anything else that wasn't said. Congratulations you now completed the 7 lessons you need for the exam :!:

Thanks Carl for providing discussion, thanks to Marko for the excellent tips and to Linda for your advise earlier.

Marko, I really appreciate all you input into our lessons, thanks for taking the time to read and answer our questions. Following your tips, I just finished cutting my left hand fingernails very short. My nails grow extremely fast and most of the time i my left fingernails are longer than what they should be.

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CarlWestman
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Re: D02 Classical guitar lesson 07

Post by CarlWestman » Mon Feb 17, 2014 12:06 am

Yes, thank you very much for your feedback and contributions, Marko. We appreciate it very much!

To clarify - I do keep my LH nails short; I brought them up w/r/t the angle my fingers are making with the fretboard. I found I could pull-off better when the nails (what little there is of them) were parallel with the string, so pulling in a direction parallel with the frets would be the most effective way to get that sound.

Cheers,
CarlW

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Marko Räsänen
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Re: D02 Classical guitar lesson 07

Post by Marko Räsänen » Mon Feb 17, 2014 7:57 am

I'm glad that you find my insight useful! I also find these discussion interesting and thought-provoking. I'm sure you're all familiar with the old saying about explaining / teaching something is a way of deepening one's understanding about the subject.
Beatriz Martin wrote:Following your tips, I just finished cutting my left hand fingernails very short. My nails grow extremely fast and most of the time i my left fingernails are longer than what they should be.
I have the same problem. Since I started taking high concentration D3, my nail (and hair) growth has been accelerated. On weeks where I don't find much practice time, I spend as much time maintaining my nails as I do playing. The positive side is, that I have never broken a nail since, and the fast growth lets me experiment with finer details of nail shapes quicker.
CarlWestman wrote:To clarify - I do keep my LH nails short; I brought them up w/r/t the angle my fingers are making with the fretboard. I found I could pull-off better when the nails (what little there is of them) were parallel with the string, so pulling in a direction parallel with the frets would be the most effective way to get that sound.
I'm not sure if I understand you correctly. Are you saying that you get a better sound when you lay your finger flat on the strings for the pull-off? I find that I sometimes need to use that strategy for the index finger pull-off onto an open string to avoid too much snap. But in years to come the problem will become that you may need to keep your other fingers fretted (and perpendicular so that they don't mute other strings) while doing the pull-off, which will limit the stance of the finger to be pulled off. But I don't think you need to worry about that yet. I suspect the pieces will fall in their place with time, practice and shaping of the left hand and fingers. What I think is the most important thing, is to pay attention to the tone and experiment, just as you are doing. Just do what you feel is / sounds best at the moment, and be mindful that your technique will go through changes as the lessons get more demanding (and restrictive) for the hand.

There was something I meant to say in my previous post, but forgot. You mention fingers being crowded when doing that pull-off. I just wanted to make sure that you're lifting finger 2 completely off the 4th string as you play 'a' on the 3rd string before the pull-off?
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CarlWestman
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Re: D02 Classical guitar lesson 07

Post by CarlWestman » Mon Feb 17, 2014 5:30 pm

Marko Räsänen wrote:I'm glad that you find my insight useful! I also find these discussion interesting and thought-provoking. I'm sure you're all familiar with the old saying about explaining / teaching something is a way of deepening one's understanding about the subject.

...
I'm not sure if I understand you correctly. Are you saying that you get a better sound when you lay your finger flat on the strings for the pull-off?

...

There was something I meant to say in my previous post, but forgot. You mention fingers being crowded when doing that pull-off. I just wanted to make sure that you're lifting finger 2 completely off the 4th string as you play 'a' on the 3rd string before the pull-off?
I hadn't hear that saying ... but I like it!

Sorry I'm not describing the hand position well, but one way to look at it is the angle of the wrist or palm. What I was doing initially was holding my fretting hand so that the palm was almost facing down the neck toward the saddle. This makes the "line" of the end of the nails have an angle to the strings. If instead I hold my palm more upward towards the ceiling, the "line" of the end of the nails is more parallel to the strings, so a pull-off is more perpendicular to the strings, and thus seems to get a bit more sound.

But you got me on yet another thing I need to attend to - finger 2! I was not lifting it at all. Sometimes this isn't a problem since I play rest stroke, the A would kill the note anyway. But since we are pinching a bass A as well, it's not necessarily the case my m finger would land on the 4th string E to kill the note. Interesting (and a bit wearying) that this lovely piece, not so hard to learn as a melody, actually has quite a few layers of technique that is not so easy.

Beatriz Martin

Re: D02 Classical guitar lesson 07

Post by Beatriz Martin » Mon Feb 17, 2014 6:37 pm

Marko Räsänen wrote:There was something I meant to say in my previous post, but forgot. You mention fingers being crowded when doing that pull-off. I just wanted to make sure that you're lifting finger 2 completely off the 4th string as you play 'a' on the 3rd string before the pull-off?
I'm glad you mentioned this. At some point I was trying to do keep finger 2 on the 4th string while playing the a on the 3rd. I wasn't successful at this and I started to lift it even though I wasn't sure how the others would do it.

Beatriz Martin

Re: D02 Classical guitar lesson 07

Post by Beatriz Martin » Mon Feb 17, 2014 11:02 pm

[media]https://youtu.be/jvPoz37NhdE[/media]
[media]https://youtu.be/ucYH8JHBmEg[/media]

Laura Staats

Re: D02 Classical guitar lesson 07

Post by Laura Staats » Tue Feb 18, 2014 12:59 am

Beatriz, it looks like you have come a long way on your slurs since last lesson. Halil, I liked when you changed your hand position to vary the tone on Ecossaise. William, thanks for the useful feedback. In general, dampening is something I still need more work on. Your version of Ecossaise, as usual, was very clean.

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Goran Penic
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Re: D02 Classical guitar lesson 07

Post by Goran Penic » Tue Feb 18, 2014 1:42 pm

:bravo: Bea. Your Giuliani sounds really good. :casque:
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Beatriz Martin

Re: D02 Classical guitar lesson 07

Post by Beatriz Martin » Wed Feb 19, 2014 12:45 am

Thank you Goran and Laura!
I have been practising the slurs every day.

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Marko Räsänen
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Re: D02 Classical guitar lesson 07

Post by Marko Räsänen » Wed Feb 19, 2014 1:24 pm

CarlWestman wrote:Sorry I'm not describing the hand position well, but one way to look at it is the angle of the wrist or palm. What I was doing initially was holding my fretting hand so that the palm was almost facing down the neck toward the saddle. This makes the "line" of the end of the nails have an angle to the strings. If instead I hold my palm more upward towards the ceiling, the "line" of the end of the nails is more parallel to the strings, so a pull-off is more perpendicular to the strings, and thus seems to get a bit more sound.
Ok, got you! The parallel angle should definitely help with the pull-offs.
Beatriz Martin wrote:I have been practising the slurs every day.
Not only the slurs, but you kept the tempo constant very well too! Well done!
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CarlWestman
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Re: D02 Classical guitar lesson 07

Post by CarlWestman » Wed Feb 19, 2014 3:28 pm

Bravo, Beatriz! Your tempo was very consistent on Giuliani, especially the beginning part (that gets played 3x in all) - in fact, I could sort of tell by the subtle bob of your head that you had internalized the tempo from listening to it many times. It was perhaps the CG version of tapping your foot to the music. There was just a slight hesitation around 0:22 as you went to the middle part, but it was almost unnoticeable, and from there, the middle part also kept an excellent tempo. Your slurs were well done as well.

If there was just one thing that could be improved, it might be mic placement. The sound just wasn't as clear as I'm used to hearing. It could be the way the guitar was facing, or the part of the house you were in, etc. I'm just not convinced it did your excellent performance justice.

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