D02 Classical guitar lesson 09

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Jean-François Delcamp
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D02 Classical guitar lesson 09

Post by Jean-François Delcamp » Tue Mar 25, 2014 6:05 pm

Hello everyone,
Please start by downloading the latest version of volume D02.
If you are new to the course, please read this message to familiarize yourself with the conditions for participating in the lessons. You should also read the first message in lesson 1, where you will find advice on how to make the most of your study time and on the methods of practising that I recommend.


First we will study some technical exercises from volume D02.
- page 81 Jean-François DELCAMP (1956) LIAISONS - LEGATURE - SLURS – LIGADOS
Ascending slurs are produced by striking (hammering down on) the string with a left hand finger. The faster and more decisive this movement is, the more volume is obtained.
Descending slurs are produced by pulling the string with a left hand finger (and letting it snap off the fingertip). The more parallel this movement is to the plane of the fingerboard (i.e. towards the adjacent string where there is one), the more volume is obtained.


- page 82 numéro 35 Jean-François DELCAMP (1956) ARPÈGES - ARPEGGI - ARPEGGIOS - ARPEGIOS
In these arpeggios, only your fingers move, be sure to keep your right hand in the same position.



Next we'll work on four pieces :
- page 18 Jean-François DELCAMP (1956) QUATRE ACCORDS
Improvise different patterns of arpeggio and different patterns of accompaniment while keeping strictly to the time signature, key and chords indicated.


- page 61 José FERRER Y ESTEVE (1835-1916) EJERCICIO N°6
Play the melody in the bass with as much legato as possible (without breaks between the notes). Damp the notes of the accompaniment, by placing your fingers on the strings, where indicated by the rests. Try out other fingerings if, in bar 7, you find the indicated fingering difficult for playing the C# and the G. I recommend that you experiment first with the various possible fingerings, (fingers 1 and 2) (fingers 1 and 3) (fingers 1 and 4) (fingers 2 and 3) (fingers 2 and 4) (fingers 3 and 4) until you finally settle on the one that allows you to obtain the best result.


- page 63 ANONYME A CANOA VIROU
In order to mark the beat yourself, you need to count the smallest rhythmic values out loud as you play, as indicated on the score: "1 e 2 e 3 e 4 e" ("1 and 2 and 3 and 4 and" in English)


- page 64 Fernando SOR (1778-1839) LEÇON XV opus 60



I ask you first to work on all these exercises and pieces for one week and then to post your recordings on the forum for:
- page 18 Jean-François DELCAMP (1956) QUATRE ACCORDS
- page 61 José FERRER Y ESTEVE (1835-1916) EJERCICIO N°6

Good luck!


I thank Geoff (GeoffB) who has helped in the translation of my lessons into English.


Jean-François

---

Exan qualifying submissions:

QUATRE ACCORDS
EJERCICIO N°6

Haris Karachristianidis
QUATRE ACCORDS
EJERCICIO N°6

Stefan Srećković
QUATRE ACCORDS
EJERCICIO N°6

Satyajit Kadle
QUATRE ACCORDS
EJERCICIO N°6

Laura Staats
QUATRE ACCORDS
EJERCICIO N°6
:( + ♫ = :)

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CarlWestman
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Re: D02 Classical guitar lesson 09

Post by CarlWestman » Wed Mar 26, 2014 4:42 am

I use youtubeMP3Podcaster (a Firefox add-on) to extract the audio from M. Delcamp's illustrative videos as a study aid. I play along with them at varying speeds. For this lesson, I could not, for some reason, extract the audio from José FERRER Y ESTEVE (1835-1916) EJERCICIO N°6. That was the only one that wouldn't work, both this lesson and, well, ever. Do the mods know anything unusual about it? Any chance it could be re-posted? As it is one we are to post, it would be particularly helpful to have the MP3 for play-along (as well as listening away from the computer). Thank you,

CW

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Marko Räsänen
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Re: D02 Classical guitar lesson 09

Post by Marko Räsänen » Wed Mar 26, 2014 7:08 am

Carl, sorry I cannot help you with the problem, but I am a little doubtful whether playing along with a recording is a useful study aid. My main concern is that by concentrating on mimicking someone else's playing, you won't develop the sense of pulse for the piece (rubato that works at high speed, can sound plain odd when slowed down), nor understanding of the musical ideas within the piece. Also, I think that even by slowing down the recording, you will be tempted to practice the piece too fast, not really concentrating on your technique. I am somewhat referring to your minuet recording from the previous lesson here. :desole:

Then there's also the 'learning to read music' -aspect, especially when it comes to understanding the written rhythm.

I would suggest not to play along with the recording at least for the first week of practice. Rather use the recordings to practice reading music.
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Re: D02 Classical guitar lesson 09

Post by Haris Karachristianidis » Wed Mar 26, 2014 9:46 am

CarlWestman with Firefox you can download the mp3 of José FERRER Y ESTEVE EJERCICIO N°6 from this link (if you still want to do it):
http://snipmp3.com/?url=http%3A//youtub ... dD8XKlGA0E

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CarlWestman
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Re: D02 Classical guitar lesson 09

Post by CarlWestman » Wed Mar 26, 2014 10:42 am

Marko Räsänen wrote:Carl, sorry I cannot help you with the problem, but I am a little doubtful whether playing along with a recording is a useful study aid. My main concern is that by concentrating on mimicking someone else's playing, you won't develop the sense of pulse for the piece (rubato that works at high speed, can sound plain odd when slowed down), nor understanding of the musical ideas within the piece. Also, I think that even by slowing down the recording, you will be tempted to practice the piece too fast, not really concentrating on your technique. I am somewhat referring to your minuet recording from the previous lesson here. :desole:

Then there's also the 'learning to read music' -aspect, especially when it comes to understanding the written rhythm.

I would suggest not to play along with the recording at least for the first week of practice. Rather use the recordings to practice reading music.
I understand your concern, Marko. As it turns out, I did not play along with the Menuet piece in the prior lesson, because I did not know what to play or how to play the ornamentation and trills that were featured on the repeated parts of each section. It kind of messed me up to play through it, so I didn't use it. I probably would have been better off if I had been able to! When I can play along with a piece, I only do so in the middle parts of the lesson ... after learning the notes, but before I'm trying to get it as good as I can. The recorder I have can speed up or slow down a recording without changing pitch; granted, it still sounds strange at extremes, like 50% tempo. But 80-90% tempo it sounds fairly undistorted.

In the prior lesson, I concede, I should have taken note of how quickly I was playing versus the indicated tempo and versus M. Delcamp's recording. I did not do this; I often do. However, I do feel a bit singled out for playing off tempo ... there are a couple submissions that are yet further off than I was, though on the slower end.

As far as playing to the indicated tempo on the sheet music, it has unfortunately been my experience that the illustrative videos often depart from the indicated tempo on the sheet music, and after raising this issue a few times in the past, I have quit trying to match the sheet music. Therefore I emulate the tempo of the demonstration in the video. I do read the music, though, but I rely on the demonstration for clues and cues.

Please note, I am not a concert musician; this is a hobby for me, and hopefully remains an enjoyable one.

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Marko Räsänen
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Re: D02 Classical guitar lesson 09

Post by Marko Räsänen » Wed Mar 26, 2014 1:16 pm

Fair enough, Carl. It looks like there was no basis for my concern.

On the matter of being singled out, I understand how you may get that feeling, but as far as the critique I offer is concerned, you shouldn't feel that way. First, unfortunately I don't have the time to listen to every performance posted on these lessons, but for those that I do, I don't nearly always comment, usually because I don't feel I have any advice to give. Or even if I do, I may not simply have the time at the moment. So it's always more or less random. The exception being my own class mates for whom I always try to comment something. I also tend to base my comments more on the actual performance in the recording when it comes to my class mates. For other class levels I tend to focus on hopefully helpful comments, and not compare anyone's performance to that of others, except for an occasional bravo, when someone's playing is exceptionally good, or I can see they've worked really hard.

On the specific matter of the tempo of your menuet, for me it never was the question of being too fast to suit musically, but two other things: 1) your chosen tempo was such that you couldn't play it through completely using the same tempo, and 2) on the parts that you played using faster tempo, it was too fast to play it clean, using legato articulation, which I think is very important for the menuet.

As long as your technique is developing (and I think it's safe to say that will be during the remainder of all the lesson levels here; not just for you, but for every student here), it's always better to play too slow than too fast, if you're only thinking about the technical development and learning. We all do however play pieces too fast / beyond our technical abilities because most pieces will sound better that way, unless playing fast means playing sloppy. In the end I don't think it matters too much which tempo is chosen for the recording posted here. What really matters is the tempo used for practice (it should be slow enough to not learn mistakes, but fast enough to be technically challenging), but unfortunately it is from those recordings that we must infer how the player is practicing and offer criticism based on that.

You're right to ignore the tempo marking in the sheet music. Many times they're just ridiculously high, and would require the technique of a professional musician to reach. None of us are concert musicians, but I think we all want to get better in our hobby, and I think it's important to discuss the practice methods too in order to improve. I sometimes get a feeling here that very few people are willing to actually take heed of the advice given by others, probably because the advice isn't coming from a proper teacher. And it's not necessarily that they disagree with the advice, or if they do, they don't express it, just ignore the advice. Which is fine, as I understand that they really don't want any feedback. I'm not speaking of you Carl, nor any of your class mates, nor anyone in particular. Just a feeling I get in general here in the English online lessons forum. It could be just me though :D
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Re: D02 Classical guitar lesson 09

Post by CarlWestman » Wed Mar 26, 2014 5:37 pm

I've just made an effort to play the piece along with the recording - take some extra effort to play over the ornamentation (which I don't know the notes for), but after a couple tries I was able to do it (perhaps because I know the notes well enough by now). I have a better sense for the tempo now and in particular noted a tempo-related part I missed (on the step down, I'm holding the last note too long before going back into the part that mirrors the beginning). May I replace my submission for this piece at some point in the near future even though lesson 9 has commenced? Would it matter?

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Re: D02 Classical guitar lesson 09

Post by Marko Räsänen » Wed Mar 26, 2014 6:38 pm

My opinion is, just because there's a new lesson doesn't mean that you should stop working with the old one. Many people are adding at later stage some mandatory recordings that they missed, or post new versions based on the feedback from others. I don't think replacing the existing recording would be a good idea though, because it would make comments from others seem out of place. Why not just add a new version?

It would definitely matter for you, if you got a confirmation from someone that you're going into the right direction with your study of the menuet. That is, or at least should be the whole point of posting your work (and of course to be eligible for the exam). I promise that I'll take the time to comment your new recording, for what it's worth. I think it's also a good idea to leave the old one for comparison.
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Re: D02 Classical guitar lesson 09

Post by LindaWoodford » Thu Mar 27, 2014 9:50 am

May I replace my submission for this piece
Hi Carl, in case your motivation for this would be to improve your exam score, then I don't think it helps, because as far as I understand, the only recording that is graded is the final exam piece that you post on the Spanish forum at the end of the course. The pieces you post in these lessons are just for your peers to comment on so that you can improve, and to show that you have participated fully in sufficient lessons to allow you to qualify to take the final exam piece. As Marko said, it's useful to keep the first recording as a comparison.

Hope that's helpful :bye:
Regards, Linda

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Re: D02 Classical guitar lesson 09

Post by GeoffB » Thu Mar 27, 2014 11:56 am

Linda and Marko have it exactly right. Just to confirm, members are expected to post here initially for feedback, and are then invited to post a second time if they have significant progress to demonstrate (showing the "before and after"). Apart from qualifying you to sit the exam by proving that you've participated in the lessons, your submissions here play no part in the exam itself.

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Quatre accords?

Post by CarlWestman » Thu Mar 27, 2014 2:13 pm

Thank you all for your feedback. I should have a revised Menuet to post in Lesson 8 shortly. Also, thanks for the heads up on grading. I did not know that only the final was graded. I thought maybe the varying levels were based on cumulative efforts, including the final.

Now, for a lesson 9 question. I know I am not the most fluent reader of sheet music, nor the most intuitive person, but I am at a loss to understand what we are to play after the first four measures of strums (that vertical squiggly line is a strum, right?). It says arpeggio, but there are many different right hand patterns for such. What M. Delcamp plays is delightful and lively, but I am not so keen of eye and ear to discern what exactly he is doing in the video, particularly for the middle 4 measures marked arpeggio. A couple specific questions for those four measures as well: what is the meaning of the diagonal slash symbol that is at the top of the stem of each dotted half note? Also, how does one play an arpeggio on all 6 strings in that 8th measure? I don't know about my colleagues here, but I only have 5 fingers on my right hand. :lol:

The last four measures are a slight puzzlement as well. I think he might be merely adding a bit of ornamentation over what is written, and that we can simply play what is written. But I could be wrong.

Again, many thanks.

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Re: D02 Classical guitar lesson 09

Post by Marko Räsänen » Thu Mar 27, 2014 2:56 pm

A single slash through the stem means to divide the full duration of the notes into 8th notes (quavers), in this case 6 of them. Double slash would mean to divide into 16th notes. It's a short hand notation used when the same note is repeated many times. In this case when it is applied on a chord it means to play 8th note arpeggios using the notes in that chord. So you play 6 note arpeggio for each bar. Note that you don't have to use every note in the chord and do not need to follow the same pattern for each bar. My suggestion is to first learn those chords by strumming and then just improvise arpeggios using those chords, let go and have fun.
Also, how does one play an arpeggio on all 6 strings in that 8th measure? I don't know about my colleagues here, but I only have 5 fingers on my right hand. :lol:
That would be difficult if you only assigned one string for each finger :) Possibilities include using thumb for each of the 3 bass strings, or offsetting your hand in the middle of the arpeggio pattern (for example first pim for strings 6,5 and 4, and then pim for strings 3, 2 and 1; or pim for 6, 3, 2, and then ipm for 3, 4, 2). The possibilities aren't limitless, but there are lots of them. Some combinations will sound better than others. One thing to note is that in that G7 chord 'g' and 'b' are duplicated, whereas 'd' and 'f' are not. You would probably do better to include all the separate notes at least once, and leave out some of those that are duplicated in octaves.
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Re: D02 Classical guitar lesson 09

Post by Håvard.Bergene » Thu Mar 27, 2014 3:11 pm

Hi Carl. I assume you're talking about the Quatre accords exercise. The wiggely line may be a strum, yes (Mr Delcamp plays strum), or it may be an arpeggiated chord (each string is picked in fast succession).
When I did this lesson there was another example (mp3) that gives a simpler example of how it could be done. See: viewtopic.php?f=118&t=67951&hilit=+d02
The intention is to play different arpeggio patterns that you make up as you go (improvisation). Don't play the same pattern twice:-) So no need to analyze what the professor does to copy it.
You may play simple or complicated arpeggio patterns, depending on your level.

(Marko typed faster than me :) )
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Re: D02 Classical guitar lesson 09

Post by CarlWestman » Thu Mar 27, 2014 3:31 pm

Thank you - yes, sorry, I meant to say I was inquiring about the Quatre Accords exercise. Although I suspected we had freedom to choose our arpeggio pattern, I try to not assume anything. Thank you for the clarification on the notation. Your idea of ensuring all notes of the chord are played at least once (and if you have to jettison one, jettison an octave) makes good sense.

Robert Goodwin

Re: D02 Classical guitar lesson 09

Post by Robert Goodwin » Thu Mar 27, 2014 5:59 pm

Hi everyone,

I have just recieved word that the title of your exam piece for D02 will be anounced on Monday 21 April 2014 on the Spanish forum. You will need to be registered on the Spanish forum as a student to participate. There is an 'english' subforum where you can sign up and request student status.

I wish you all, the very best of success with your studies and with the exam.

Remember to tune your guitar before recording. I have noticed a few 'off' sounding recordings in all of the levels recently.

Best regards,
Bob G.

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