D05 Classical guitar lesson 09

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Jean-François Delcamp
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D05 Classical guitar lesson 09

Post by Jean-François Delcamp » Tue Mar 25, 2014 6:07 pm

Hello everyone,
Please start by downloading the latest version of volume D05.
If you are new to the course, please read this message to familiarize yourself with the conditions for participating in the lessons. You should also read the first message in lesson 1, where you will find advice on how to make the most of your study time and on the methods of practising that I recommend.



Now we are going to work on a series of exercises:
- page 151 Francisco Tàrrega (1852-1909) Estudio en re mayor n°99, Estudio en la mayor n°100.
Here is a golden opportunity to practise position changes (moving the left hand up and down the fingerboard) and at the same time to acquire a new competency in playing the higher notes.
[media]https://youtu.be//_H3yaJJbr5c[/media]



Today we'll look at 4 pieces.
- page 30 Robert Johnson (1542-1603) Alman VII
Two sections oppose and respond to one another. The first is an ascending section, from the beginning of the piece to the 3rd eighth note (quaver) of bar 4. It is an almost martial section, very dynamic, and requires a lot of energy.
The second section leads us back from the dominant (E) to the tonic (A). This is a much more flowing section, which is played legato without using much energy, letting oneself be carried along on the descent from the dynamic that was created earlier with the first section.
This succession of surges and falls continues in the same way right to the end.



- page 38 Gaspar Sanz (1640-1710) Canarios En Sol Majeur
Each 4-bar section is itself divided into 2 phrases of 2 bars each. These two 2-bar phrases form a dialogue with one another.
Begin your practice by seeking out all the sensations which will help you to recognize these two phrases as "responding to one another". Like question and answer, or like affirmation and challenge. The key to the canario is to be found in this relationship between two complementary phrases. The two phrases may sometimes be complementary in an obvious way, and sometimes in a more subtle way.



- page 98 Américo Jacomino (1889-1928) Arrependida
After a short introduction of 4 bars, each 8-bar section is itself divided into two phrases of 4 bars each. These two 4-bar phrases form a dialogue with one another.
Begin your practice by seeking out all the sensations which will help you to recognize these two phrases as "responding to one another". Like question and answer, or like affirmation and challenge. The key to the Arrependida is to be found in this relationship between two complementary phrases.



Julio Sagreras (1879-1942) Lecciones III n°23
Each 8-bar section is itself divided into two phrases of 4 bars each. These two 4-bar phrases form a dialogue with one another.
Begin your practice by seeking out all the sensations which will help you to recognize these two phrases as "responding to one another". The key to this Ranchera is to be found in this relationship between two complementary phrases.








I ask you first to work on all these exercises and tunes for a week and then to upload your recordings of:
- page 98 Américo Jacomino (1889-1928) Arrependida




Good luck!


I thank Geoff (GeoffB) who has helped in the translation of my lessons into English.


Jean-François


Exam qualifying submissions: :
Américo Jacomino (1889-1928) Arrependida

Håvard.Bergene
Américo Jacomino (1889-1928) Arrependida

Pat Hargan
Américo Jacomino (1889-1928) Arrependida

Marko Räsänen
Américo Jacomino (1889-1928) Arrependida

Eric de Vries
Américo Jacomino (1889-1928) Arrependida
:( + ♫ = :)

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Marko Räsänen
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Re: D05 Classical guitar lesson 09

Post by Marko Räsänen » Thu Mar 27, 2014 7:50 am

Just a quick note. I was watching some of the more difficult measures of Arrependida in professor Delcamp's video, and noticed that he plays beats 1&2 of bar 113 using the 2nd string instead of the indicated 3rd string. That hammer-on pull-off combination is probably easier when played on the 2nd string, although I don't think it's too difficult to play as indicated in the music, at least on my guitar. Definitely one of those sections (starting from bar 110) that require some dedicated practice. Still, bar 38 seems to be for me the one requiring the most work, with the opposite motion going on with fingers 3 and 4. I can't think of any easier alternate fingerings for it without leaving some of the notes out (for example the 'e'), but I suppose it gets easier with lots of repeats.
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Re: D05 Classical guitar lesson 09

Post by Håvard.Bergene » Thu Mar 27, 2014 12:27 pm

I also played bar 113 on 2nd string. I don't remember if I noticed Mr Delcamp doing it, or just because I found it easier. Now I'm trying to relearn it by using 3rd string as indicated. The sound is a little different, and I think it is easier to accidentally hit the 2nd string while moving the l.h. preparing for bar 114. When playing on 2nd string you'll have to make a quick "backwards" move to make the glissando with 4th finger, but that is not too difficult. I find bar 112 the most difficult in that section. I think I cheated by using a bar with 2nd finger as a helper (bad paractice). Bar 38 will come along after some time. It required a lot of work last time, but now I already had it programmed in muscle memory :D. Another bar I think is a "boxed section" is bar (25)26-28. I noticed that I had programmed another fingering using 4 and 2 in the first beat of bar 26 ending up with 2 on the bass F in bar 28 from last time (if I remember correctly without the guitar). I think that makes it easier in the start of the section, but a bit difficult to avoid buzzing in the end. In the indicated fingering I find it a bit awkward to move the 4 finger on 1st string to the same fret as the 3 finger on 5th string .
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Re: D05 Classical guitar lesson 09

Post by Marko Räsänen » Thu Mar 27, 2014 2:24 pm

Håvard.Bergene wrote:I also played bar 113 on 2nd string. I don't remember if I noticed Mr Delcamp doing it, or just because I found it easier. Now I'm trying to relearn it by using 3rd string as indicated. The sound is a little different, and I think it is easier to accidentally hit the 2nd string while moving the l.h. preparing for bar 114. When playing on 2nd string you'll have to make a quick "backwards" move to make the glissando with 4th finger, but that is not too difficult.
I too tend to accidentally hit the 2nd string when doing the pull-off, but I find that the use of open 1st string for the 3rd beat gives plenty of time to prepare for the next bar. Part of the difficulty is to play that open 'e' softly enough so that it doesn't stand out too much. I initially also played the first two beats on the 2nd string (simply because I didn't notice the circled 3), but haven't done so at speed, so I cannot comment on the difficulty of the 'backwards' move. I do appreciate having the pinky at the correct fret right after the difficult bar 112. One less thing to worry about :)
Håvard.Bergene wrote:I find bar 112 the most difficult in that section. I think I cheated by using a bar with 2nd finger as a helper (bad paractice).
I don't think using a barre itself is bad practice, nor cheating, and I don't think you would need the 2nd finger as a helper anymore after the things professor Delcamp has made us play this year :D But I think it's more difficult to do strong vibrato (like professor Delcamp does on that bar) when using a barre, so there's one incentive to follow the original fingering. Another one is, that by doing so your wrist will already be on the position needed for the glissando to 13th fret. I am currently at the stage where I can do the original fingering when I practice the move from the previous bar in isolation, but will often fail when I play the Trio as complete.
Håvard.Bergene wrote:Bar 38 will come along after some time. It required a lot of work last time, but now I already had it programmed in muscle memory :D.
Yep, I'm already making some progress with it, and it starts to look doable :)
Håvard.Bergene wrote:Another bar I think is a "boxed section" is bar (25)26-28. I noticed that I had programmed another fingering using 4 and 2 in the first beat of bar 26 ending up with 2 on the bass F in bar 28 from last time (if I remember correctly without the guitar). I think that makes it easier in the start of the section, but a bit difficult to avoid buzzing in the end. In the indicated fingering I find it a bit awkward to move the 4 finger on 1st string to the same fret as the 3 finger on 5th string .
I am guessing this is because your wrist injury. What I do is simply rotate my hand outwards from the elbow, and the pinky slides to 4th fret. Within that section the most difficult bit for me is the glissando from 'a' to 'c'. If fretting the bass c# with 2 instead of 3 makes it easier for you, I'd say go for it. By doing that, I don't think you'll miss any skill you're supposed to learn.
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Re: D05 Classical guitar lesson 09

Post by Robert Goodwin » Thu Mar 27, 2014 6:20 pm

Hi everyone,

I have just recieved word that the title of your exam piece for D05 will be anounced on Monday 21 April 2014 on the Spanish forum. You will need to be registered on the Spanish forum as a student to participate. There is an 'english' subforum where you can sign up and request student status.

I wish you all, the very best of success with your studies and with the exam.

Remember to tune your guitar before recording. I have noticed a few 'off' sounding recordings in all of the levels recently.

Best regards,
Bob G.

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Re: D05 Classical guitar lesson 09

Post by EricKatz » Fri Mar 28, 2014 10:12 am

:chaud: Wow, that's three and a half weeks more time for preparation than last year!

2012/2013: announcement 14 May, exams on 14-16 June. Exam piece: Arrependida (which was already an exam qualifying submission in lesson 9, four pages)
2013/2014: announcement 21 April, exams on 13-15 June

The exam piece must be very challenging this year (and more than 4 pages long?). :wink:

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Re: D05 Classical guitar lesson 09

Post by Håvard.Bergene » Sat Mar 29, 2014 10:49 pm

Here is my first recording of Arrependida for this lesson. I messed with the settings for the mic, so it has got some clipping. I'll try to record it one more time this lesson. I think I've made good progress since my last recording of this piece:-) I've decided to go for my alternative fingering in bar 26-27 (cutting the F short) and the 2nd string version of bar 113. Bar 38 I think I jump too much with my hand. I think it sounds ok(?), but I'll look into that part slowly to see if I can do it smoother.
[media]https://youtu.be/AmYzoXFvRJo[/media]
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Re: D05 Classical guitar lesson 09

Post by Marko Räsänen » Sun Mar 30, 2014 9:43 am

:bravo: Håvard!

That's an unbelievably fast tempo you chose to play the piece at. That's at least compared to tempo I've been practicing. You must have the piece memorized quite well to be able to do that. But I am once again of the opinion, that you should slow down, as I feel that you are cutting melody notes short too much in order to achieve such speed, and at the same time lose many opportunities to vary the articulation to make the piece more musical. Also I think you had more buzzing notes than lately in general.

I personally find that there are quite many difficult left hand transitions in this piece, so much that I am a bit skeptic about being able to play this piece with similar fluency that you do (while keeping the melody legato, and the tone good), at least during this lesson.

But in any case, I want to congratulate you for achieving so clean recording using that fast tempo. That's quite an accomplishment!
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Re: D05 Classical guitar lesson 09

Post by Håvard.Bergene » Sun Mar 30, 2014 11:41 am

:merci: Marko.
I agree about the tempo being a bit to fast. I think I manage it a bit more musically at that speed when practicing. I can see it in may facial expressions in the move that I've got way more tension than I think I usually have when not recording. I memorized the whole thing after the D04 exam last year (in about 2 weeks I guess), and played it more or less the whole summer. Although I haven't played it at all since september, this is not a one week effort. When I picked it up in this lessons I did not remember it anymore, but my reading skills has definitely improved this year, because I was able to play through the whole thing at (very) slow tempo. Muscle memory was awakened, and now I remember the whole thing again. I tried to play slower during the recording, but somehow the speed gradually became faster towards the last recording (which was best). I tend to loose focus more often at slower speed, so that is something I should prcatice :wink: (focus and more accurate finger placements).
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Re: D05 Classical guitar lesson 09

Post by Marko Räsänen » Mon Mar 31, 2014 11:50 am

I thought I'd link to my favourite Arrependida version from last year's D05 final exam.
http://www.guitarraclasicadelcamp.com/v ... 90#p129479

I especially like how he brings the melody out front in the third part. Very inspiring!
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Re: D05 Classical guitar lesson 09

Post by EricKatz » Mon Mar 31, 2014 2:16 pm

You surely have a head start, Havard. Good job!
Your fingers seem to have remembered where to go. Musically speaking, the piece has the right valsa mood, so it's nice to listen to it.

I have some little remarks. First of all, in my opinion your glissando's are a bit too wild, too rough. They should be played more subtle. Second, you seem to make a glissando in the transition from bar 6 to bar 7 (and 70-71) and also in bar 19 (and 83). I think at these places it's only a finger guide.

From a technical point of view I agree with Marko. Your recording makes a very good impression at first, but when you listen better there are a lot of notes that aren't clear and clean. Maybe you have to take a step back from the final performance and built it up carefully again. With the present muscle memory that shouldn't take too long!

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Re: D05 Classical guitar lesson 09

Post by Marko Räsänen » Mon Mar 31, 2014 4:41 pm

Eric, regarding the glissandos, I guess what you're saying (among other things) is to have more time allocated for the non-sliding part of the note, and less for the sliding? As the sliding part cannot be played softer without making the destination note softer too. I think when playing this piece as fast as Håvard does, it becomes very difficult to not make the slides stand out too much. In the last year's D05 final exam, those overwhelming slides did trouble me too, especially the ones in bar 5 (69). Especially with light tension strings the pitch becomes inaccurate because the sliding temporary loosens the string (similar to as vibrato does), and the end result sounds unmusical. Therefore I think it's important that at least that bar is played relatively slow, so that the listener clearly hears separate notes of 'e', 'a' and 'e', and not something that sounds like a slide bar moving in-between 'e' and 'a' and back.

I looked up the word 'Arrependida'. It's Portuguese, and means 'remorsefulness'. Therefore I think the player must avoid any lightness or playfulness in their playing, except maybe for the third part. But I guess it cannot be played in too pathetic way either.

Regarding the glissando between bars 6 and 7, I think it's ok to have an audible slide, but it must be very short, barely noticeable, and the note should naturally be plucked right at arriving to 'e', not a fraction of a second earlier. However regarding bar 19 I disagree about. Here the fingering wouldn't made sense unless sliding would be called for. But again, in my opinion the slide should be on the short side. Well over half of the duration of 'e' must pass before starting to slide towards 'c'. This is again an intricacy of articulation that can be lost with high tempo.
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Re: D05 Classical guitar lesson 09

Post by Marko Räsänen » Tue Apr 01, 2014 7:42 am

Please everyone note that Prof. Delcamp has changed the D05 exam to an earlier date!
viewtopic.php?f=41&t=54023&start=195#p922152
Fifth-year final exam 21, 22, 23 May
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Re: D05 Classical guitar lesson 09

Post by EricKatz » Tue Apr 01, 2014 10:44 am

Since today is a national day for practical jokes in the Netherlands, you can imagine I don't believe everything they tell me today! :mrgreen:
But in my posting of 28 March I already pointed out that the time between announcement (29 April) and the (original) date of the exam (13-15 June) would be longer then last year. So I believe it's true!

@ Marko
We already discussed a lot about the glissando's. The conclusion was: there are a lot of inconsistencies in the notation throughout the lesson books (and scores from other authors). But inconsistency in one and the same score might be a bit strange. In the rest of the piece the glissando's are written with small notes. That could also have been done in bar 6-7 and 19. That's why I think one should not play a glissando.
Apart from that, there are already so much glissando's in this piece. Personally, I don't like them. It's a bit of a cheap trick. I read somewhere Jacomino was a violist. Maybe his bias for glissando's was influenced by gypsy (violin) music?

What I meant about playing the glissando's, is difficult to explain in words. I think it shouldn't sound as if you're finger is heavily bumping at each fret, but more like a swipe. The difference is the pressure you give with your LH-finger (and of course also the stroke of the RH-finger).
But you're right, it's difficult to make it sound loud enough, with a bit of sustain on the last note.

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Re: D05 Classical guitar lesson 09

Post by Goran Penic » Tue Apr 01, 2014 1:20 pm

Eric de Vries wrote:... I read somewhere Jacomino was a violist. Maybe his bias for glissando's was influenced by gypsy (violin) music?
...
Américo Jacomino (São Paulo 12 de fevereiro de 1889 — 7 de setembro de 1928) foi um violonista brasileiro ...
=
Américo Jacomino (Sao Paulo February 12, 1889 - September 7, 1928) was a Brazilian guitarist ...

violonista (Portuguese) = guitarist (English)

http://pt.wikipedia.org/wiki/Canhoto_(violonista)
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