D03 Classical guitar lesson 04

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Jean-François Delcamp
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D03 Classical guitar lesson 04

Post by Jean-François Delcamp » Wed Dec 03, 2014 10:29 am

Hello everyone,
Please start by downloading the latest version of volume D03.
If you are new to the course, please read this message to familiarize yourself with the conditions for participating in the lessons. You should also read the first message in lesson 1, where you will find advice on how to make the most of your study time and on the methods of practising that I recommend.




Today, we're going to work on a series of exercises.
- page 89, numbers 13, 14, 15 - Jean-François DELCAMP (1956) GAMMES - SCALE - SCALES – ESCALAS
When changes of position are needed, you will be using the "position shift" technique. Position I is the left hand position where the index finger (1) is placed behind the 1st fret, position V is the hand position where the index (1) is placed behind the fifth fret, etc. The position shift involves moving the left hand along the neck, from position to position, from fret to fret. In the scales we're looking at today, notice that my first finger never leaves the first string, I use it as a guide for my hand. Position shifts are shown by oblique lines linking two fingering indications given for the same finger.
The following videos are for numbers 13, 14, 15 on page 89. Concentrate your practice on the passages highlighted in yellow, and do your best to perfect the position shift technique.






- Page 94, numbers 29, 30, 31. Jean-François DELCAMP (1956) LIAISONS - LEGATURE - SLURS – LIGADOS
We have already worked on the rest stroke (apoyando) with the fingers of the right hand. Now we are going to work on doing a rest stroke with the fingers of the left hand. That is the best way to learn how to execute descending slurs. In number 30, bar 2, the fingers of the left hand execute the slurs with the help of the rest stroke. The fingers 4, 3, 2 and then 1 pluck the second string then finish their move by coming up against the first string. Place the left hand fingers vertically in relation to the fingerboard, that's the right position to play slurs.









Finally, we'll look at 3 pieces, pages 14, 30, 46 et 47.
- page 14 Francis CUTTING (ca. 1600) PACKINGTON'S POUND
There are numerous repetitions, so vary the tone colour to avoid monotony. To obtain different tone colours, play:
- over the soundhole (the sound volume is at its best here and you get a good balance between the bass and treble notes);
- over the fingerboard (the sound here is softer, closer to the that of a clarinet, and the basses are softened);
- near the bridge (the sound here is more metallic, and becomes close to that of the harpsichord, the basses are strengthened and the trebles weakened).




- page 30 Gaspar SANZ (1640-1710) SALTAREN
This dance will serve as a basis for improvisation work proposed in lesson N. 7. The sequence of the three following chords: D Major, G Major, A Major requires imagination to avoid monotony. In order to avoid monotony use dynamic changes (fortissimo, forte, piano, pianissimo), different sound colors (sound hole, fingerboard, bridge, with nail, no nail) and different strumming styles: rasgueados, plucked chords, arpegiated to the bass or treble, etc … .




- page 46-47 Ferdinand CARULLI (1770-1841) ANDANTE
This piece consists of three sections, the third section being identical to the first, so it has an A-B-B-A structure, also called ternary form.
Vary the tone colour to avoid monotony.





I advise you to work on all the exercises and the four pieces for a week. Then please record and upload your recordings of the following:
- page 14 Francis CUTTING (ca. 1600) PACKINGTON'S POUND
- page 30 Gaspar SANZ (1640-1710) SALTAREN




Good luck!


I thank Eric (wchymeUS) and Geoff (GeoffB) who have helped in the translation of my lessons into English.


Jean-François

---

Exam qualifying submissions:

PACKINGTON'S POUND
SALTAREN

Haris Karachristianidis
PACKINGTON'S POUND
SALTAREN

Duang Turongratanachai
PACKINGTON'S POUND
SALTAREN

Beatriz Martin
PACKINGTON'S POUND
SALTAREN

Carl Westman
PACKINGTON'S POUND
SALTAREN

Rick Beauregard
PACKINGTON'S POUND
SALTAREN
:( + ♫ = :)

abel
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Re: D03 Classical guitar lesson 04

Post by abel » Fri Dec 05, 2014 6:25 pm

Hi everybody,

I supose that students are still sleeping. So, I hit the bell: all these pieces are very interesting. Good luck everybody.

Greetings

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Haris Karachristianidis
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Re: D03 Classical guitar lesson 04

Post by Haris Karachristianidis » Sat Dec 06, 2014 10:11 am

Yes they are very interesting. Packingtons Pound, many 1/16ths, many dampings between them. It is a great piece except the middle part which I don't like. So many repetitions.. In all versions I saw in youtube the middle part is only 1 line, in our version it is 2 lines...
La minor goes up to 17th fret.

Beatriz Martin

Re: D03 Classical guitar lesson 04

Post by Beatriz Martin » Sun Dec 07, 2014 1:15 am

Interesting and difficult! I don't know how I will get through all the strumming in Saltaren. Re Packington's Pond, is delcamp doing rest stroke? Not only I dont like rest stroke, but also I dont think it is necessary for this piece. I have seen versions of this piece is youtube with free stroke and I like them very much.

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Haris Karachristianidis
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Re: D03 Classical guitar lesson 04

Post by Haris Karachristianidis » Sun Dec 07, 2014 6:33 am

Beatriz Martin wrote:Interesting and difficult! I don't know how I will get through all the strumming in Saltaren. Re Packington's Pond, is delcamp doing rest stroke? Not only I dont like rest stroke, but also I dont think it is necessary for this piece. I have seen versions of this piece is youtube with free stroke and I like them very much.
I agree about Saltaren.
I think too Mr Delcamp plays rest strokes in the video. But this is up to you if you play it so or not. I don't play it with rest strokes.

In bar 7 does Mr Delcamp damp all three notes (mi,sol#,si) before he plays the next ones (la,la)?

Beatriz Martin

Re: D03 Classical guitar lesson 04

Post by Beatriz Martin » Sun Dec 07, 2014 11:54 pm

I think you would damp the E with the thumb. You don't need to damp the G# since you immediately play the A on same string on bar 8. You could damp the B slightly touching the second string when do the A on the third string.

Beatriz Martin

Re: D03 Classical guitar lesson 04

Post by Beatriz Martin » Sun Dec 07, 2014 11:58 pm

What did delcamp did with Saltaren? ...He played the whole bar once, than after that I think he did improvisation, he repeated the bars few times. What are we supposed to do?

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Haris Karachristianidis
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Re: D03 Classical guitar lesson 04

Post by Haris Karachristianidis » Mon Dec 08, 2014 7:29 am

Beatriz Martin wrote:I think you would damp the E with the thumb. You don't need to damp the G# since you immediately play the A on same string on bar 8. You could damp the B slightly touching the second string when do the A on the third string.
Thank you Bea. It sounds like he damps all 3 notes before he plays la,la. But I am not sure.

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Marko Räsänen
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Re: D03 Classical guitar lesson 04

Post by Marko Räsänen » Mon Dec 08, 2014 1:02 pm

Beatriz Martin wrote:What did delcamp did with Saltaren? ...He played the whole bar once, than after that I think he did improvisation, he repeated the bars few times. What are we supposed to do?
There's the chord progression D-G-A-D and the given rhythmic pattern. You're supposed to experiment different ways of strumming. Just repeat those bars as many times as you want to, and try to keep it sounding interesting by varying the way you strum the chords. You can also include arpeggios if you want to (in which case you would probably only play 8th notes instead of the given rhythmic pattern). Be creative! The important thing is to keep the pulse of the piece constant. You cannot go wrong if you do that.
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Marko Räsänen
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Re: D03 Classical guitar lesson 04

Post by Marko Räsänen » Mon Dec 08, 2014 1:19 pm

Haris Karachristianidis wrote:
Beatriz Martin wrote:I think you would damp the E with the thumb. You don't need to damp the G# since you immediately play the A on same string on bar 8. You could damp the B slightly touching the second string when do the A on the third string.
Thank you Bea. It sounds like he damps all 3 notes before he plays la,la. But I am not sure.
Yes, he damps all three notes. Bea's way will work, but I think prof. Delcamp damps the notes with his right hand (well, left hand as he is a lefty, but I mean with fingers p-i-m) creating a slight pause between the chords for a dramatic staccato effect. It's noteworthy that usually he damps the bass notes with p after he has played the next note, unless there is a rest in-between, but in this case E (Mi) is damped before A (La) is played. He then once more moves his 'p' to mute any possible sympathetic resonance on the 6th, or perhaps he does that on instinct being used to damp after having played the note.

Find a way of damping that sounds good on your guitar, and that you can technically manage. Damping the 6th string both before and and after playing the 5th string does seem a bit excessive.
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Haris Karachristianidis
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Re: D03 Classical guitar lesson 04

Post by Haris Karachristianidis » Mon Dec 08, 2014 2:35 pm

Thanks a lot Marko!

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Re: D03 Classical guitar lesson 04

Post by Haris Karachristianidis » Sun Dec 14, 2014 3:03 pm

Here are my submissions for lesson 4.

Thank you for comments!

[media]https://youtu.be/aoZxu-7HT9k[/media]
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Halil Akaydin
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Re: D03 Classical guitar lesson 04

Post by Halil Akaydin » Sun Dec 14, 2014 6:05 pm

Hi Haris,

I really admire your technique and especially the great tone your getting.

My only criticism would be that your playing was a little robotic in this video. Have a listen and you will probably see what I mean. I think playing a bit more freely would make the piece sound more musical.

Keep up the great work :casque:

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Haris Karachristianidis
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Re: D03 Classical guitar lesson 04

Post by Haris Karachristianidis » Sun Dec 14, 2014 6:45 pm

Thank you for comment Halil!
I think I understand what you mean. But I always like to stick to the score of the piece and don't like to alter what I am reading by putting anything personal and different. Also, I still am not 100% relaxed when I record. I am at a very good level comparing to recordings of last year but not 100%.

Thank you again!

Beatriz Martin

Re: D03 Classical guitar lesson 04

Post by Beatriz Martin » Sun Dec 14, 2014 10:13 pm

Hi Haris, very nice your recordings, I can't believe you did them so fast.
In Packingston's Pond, I dont see how are you muting the E in six string from bar 17 to 25 and maybe a bit further. I see you well muting E on six string after playing the A on the fifth in the first two lines and the last two lines.

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