[Matt] hello

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Topics archived from Public Space and its subforums after a long period of inactivity, or redundant for some other reason. This section is read-only.
Matt

[Matt] hello

Post by Matt » Fri Apr 01, 2005 3:50 pm

hey Everyone :D

My name is Matt and I live in a small town in Ontario Canada. I'm a Seventeen year-old senior highschool student, and I've been playing rock guitar for about 3 years, and classical for almost two years. Im planning on going to university for music/guitar in 2006 (I'm taking next year off from school) and I hope to be a pro guitar teacher/performer someday.

Matt

Buckley

Post by Buckley » Fri Apr 01, 2005 7:10 pm

Hey Bob, you know, I've never been to Lake Geneva. As a Wisconsonite, I've always thought of it as a vacation site for Chicago people. :)

Although not asked, I'll freely give my opinion of Sagreras' method books. I love them. Nothing has helped me improve more than they have. Not only are the lessons instructive, oftentimes they are just beautiful to play. In fact, I'm thinking of recording for the site my rendition (sparse as it is) of Sagreras' study from book 3, number 18. It is a beautiful, sad waltz.

Welcome Matt and Archangel.

-John.

cconsaul

Another thing about the Sagrares Methods

Post by cconsaul » Fri Apr 01, 2005 11:50 pm

They are bilingual, which is particularly helpfull in my area. Sionce I can get them in both English and Spanish, I can more readily communicate with students who are here in their first year of study. They are definately no nonsense and I am hesitant about using them with my fifth graders, but considering some of the alternatives out there, the Sagraras is looking better and better all the time.

Archangel

Post by Archangel » Sat Apr 02, 2005 12:25 am

Buckley wrote:Hey Bob, you know, I've never been to Lake Geneva. As a Wisconsonite, I've always thought of it as a vacation site for Chicago people. :)

Although not asked, I'll freely give my opinion of Sagreras' method books. I love them. Nothing has helped me improve more than they have. Not only are the lessons instructive, oftentimes they are just beautiful to play. In fact, I'm thinking of recording for the site my rendition (sparse as it is) of Sagreras' study from book 3, number 18. It is a beautiful, sad waltz.

Welcome Matt and Archangel.

-John.
Hm well I`m only on exercise nr 21 in the first book so I can`t really comment on them that much.

Allthough I would have appriciated that the book would have eleborated alittle bit more on the technical purpose for the individual lessons, but thats just me .

BobM

Post by BobM » Sat Apr 02, 2005 12:51 am

Thanks Buckey(John), cconsaul and Archangel,

I appreciate your input about Sagreras. I'm ready to order them but I wanted to know before shedding the money. :D

By the way John, I met a lot of beautiful Wisconsonite girls there in my time...Lucky us Chicagoans :D

Happy guitar1

Bob

cconsaul

How do you list those guitars?

Post by cconsaul » Sat Apr 02, 2005 10:48 pm

I think that's kind of cool. Of course, my guitars don't have nearly the lineage yours do. My laying around the living room guitar is a Yamaha FG-75 that I bought from a jewelry store for twenty five dollars. I got a hunk of leather next door and tied it to the guitar, threew it on my back and hitch-hiked to San Fransisco. The thing stayed on my back for about seven and a half years, while I pursued the joys of folksinging. That guitar's name is Sen-Chen (after an old grilfreind who was extremely patient with me) The next one is an Oveation Adama that I named Martin. My freinds siad that if I was ever going to be a serious musician, I had to own a Martin. I realize that wasn't what they meant, and I don't have anything against Martins, but like another one of my old friends, Steve Goodman said, "not many people can own a Martin and have kids all at the same time!" There have been many other guitars, especially Gunther (a classical style guitar I picked up in East Berlin while I was stationed with the 298th Army Band) but those tickle my funny bonce every time I see them.

BobM

Re: How do you list those guitars?

Post by BobM » Sat Apr 02, 2005 11:48 pm

cconsaul wrote:I think that's kind of cool. Of course, my guitars don't have nearly the lineage yours do. My laying around the living room guitar is a Yamaha FG-75 that I bought from a jewelry store for twenty five dollars. I got a hunk of leather next door and tied it to the guitar, threew it on my back and hitch-hiked to San Fransisco. The thing stayed on my back for about seven and a half years, while I pursued the joys of folksinging. That guitar's name is Sen-Chen (after an old grilfreind who was extremely patient with me) The next one is an Oveation Adama that I named Martin. My freinds siad that if I was ever going to be a serious musician, I had to own a Martin. I realize that wasn't what they meant, and I don't have anything against Martins, but like another one of my old friends, Steve Goodman said, "not many people can own a Martin and have kids all at the same time!" There have been many other guitars, especially Gunther (a classical style guitar I picked up in East Berlin while I was stationed with the 298th Army Band) but those tickle my funny bonce every time I see them.
That's quite a "trip" for a guitar, 7 years is quite a long time. My guitars don't have that "history" nor a name either. Still, I don't believe much in the "lineage" of an instrument if it doesn't appeal to me. For example, some guitars have a nice sound but handle the wrong way for my hands and the other way around...I owned a guitar once that had no name or any frills compared with the expensive ones or the "great" ones and I can asure you, I would choose it any time to whatever else out there.

I guess the name of the game is to "have fun" and I can see you've got your share of it, ccosaul. Congratulations!

Bob

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