Bach Cello Suites

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ddray
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Joined: Sun Apr 23, 2017 3:10 pm

Re: Bach Cello Suites

Post by ddray » Tue Apr 17, 2018 1:40 am

Conall wrote:
Fri Apr 06, 2018 8:57 am

All pro guitarists should aim to read bass clef - incredibly handy for those who like to make their own arrangements of cello, piano music etc. - and an "extra string to your bow" in that it's relatively easy to learn & teach bass guitar (from classical guitar) & then be available for shows requiring bass guitar.

The tenor clef is a pain though (parts of the last suite) but not impossible.

That scordatura in the fifth suite was hard for me to get used to. Not being a "native" string player (but learning), I still struggle with it. I have an edition in regular tuning, one with scordatura intact and another with both. The regular tuning, while "easier", apparently is supposed to sacrifice a lot of luscious chords and sonorities...although if I'm not mistaken Fournier used regular tuning.
Bei einer andächtigen Musik ist allezeit Gott mit seiner Gnaden Gegenwart.
--J. S. Bach

Conall
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Joined: Wed Dec 27, 2017 10:26 am
Location: Scotland

Re: Bach Cello Suites

Post by Conall » Tue Apr 17, 2018 6:41 am

ddray wrote:
Tue Apr 17, 2018 1:40 am
Conall wrote:
Fri Apr 06, 2018 8:57 am

All pro guitarists should aim to read bass clef - incredibly handy for those who like to make their own arrangements of cello, piano music etc. - and an "extra string to your bow" in that it's relatively easy to learn & teach bass guitar (from classical guitar) & then be available for shows requiring bass guitar.

The tenor clef is a pain though (parts of the last suite) but not impossible.


That scordatura in the fifth suite was hard for me to get used to. Not being a "native" string player (but learning), I still struggle with it. I have an edition in regular tuning, one with scordatura intact and another with both. The regular tuning, while "easier", apparently is supposed to sacrifice a lot of luscious chords and sonorities...although if I'm not mistaken Fournier used regular tuning.
I envy you being able to play cello.
Mind you I also want to be a violinist, oboist, organist, (real) lutenist & (better) pianist....oh and a decent tenor!

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rojarosguitar
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Location: near Freiburg, Germany

Re: Bach Cello Suites

Post by rojarosguitar » Tue Apr 17, 2018 2:04 pm

Funny that this comes up again. i just finished listening to the Naxos Historical edition of JSB suites played by Casals... While listening, I thought I'll have a look into the Prelude of the third suite, on my 'cello' tuned guitar (CGDAbe ) from the orginal sheet music... It's so reach, I don't think it needs a special guitar arrangement...
Music is a big continent with different landscapes and corners. Some of them I do visit frequently, some from time to time and some I know from hearsay only ...
My Youtube Channel is: TheMusicalEvents

Conall
Posts: 328
Joined: Wed Dec 27, 2017 10:26 am
Location: Scotland

Re: Bach Cello Suites

Post by Conall » Tue Apr 17, 2018 5:08 pm

rojarosguitar wrote:
Tue Apr 17, 2018 2:04 pm
Funny that this comes up again. i just finished listening to the Naxos Historical edition of JSB suites played by Casals... While listening, I thought I'll have a look into the Prelude of the third suite, on my 'cello' tuned guitar (CGDAbe ) from the orginal sheet music... It's so reach, I don't think it needs a special guitar arrangement...
I like the idea of cello tuning (with the extra 2 normal 1st & 2nd) more than the effect, at least on my guitars. Do you have any particular brand type & tension you recommend for this? I'm a bit nervous of tuning the 3rd G up to A. And the C? On my 8 string I tried CdeGDgAe where 2nd is a B tuned down to A - but it sounds pretty poor.
Using cello tuning in any form obviously has the advantage of matching the open string pedal notes prevalent in the cello suites but makes legato playing (between strings because of the larger stretches) & chords more difficult.

ddray
Posts: 1094
Joined: Sun Apr 23, 2017 3:10 pm

Re: Bach Cello Suites

Post by ddray » Tue Apr 17, 2018 7:04 pm

Conall wrote:
Tue Apr 17, 2018 6:41 am
ddray wrote:
Tue Apr 17, 2018 1:40 am
Conall wrote:
Fri Apr 06, 2018 8:57 am

All pro guitarists should aim to read bass clef - incredibly handy for those who like to make their own arrangements of cello, piano music etc. - and an "extra string to your bow" in that it's relatively easy to learn & teach bass guitar (from classical guitar) & then be available for shows requiring bass guitar.

The tenor clef is a pain though (parts of the last suite) but not impossible.


That scordatura in the fifth suite was hard for me to get used to. Not being a "native" string player (but learning), I still struggle with it. I have an edition in regular tuning, one with scordatura intact and another with both. The regular tuning, while "easier", apparently is supposed to sacrifice a lot of luscious chords and sonorities...although if I'm not mistaken Fournier used regular tuning.
I envy you being able to play cello.
Mind you I also want to be a violinist, oboist, organist, (real) lutenist & (better) pianist....oh and a decent tenor!
Oh no, I've just started lessons. I'm just doing scales and learning the fingerboard and basic bowing techniques at this point. It's still a while before I'll even be tackling vibrato. :lol: The hardest part is co-ordinating your hands. I've heard some say that playing bowed instruments is like playing two instruments at once, and I'm finding that it's true. My experience with the Bach suites is just reading them and trying to apply them to guitar.
Bei einer andächtigen Musik ist allezeit Gott mit seiner Gnaden Gegenwart.
--J. S. Bach

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rojarosguitar
Posts: 4705
Joined: Sat Sep 19, 2009 12:24 pm
Location: near Freiburg, Germany

Re: Bach Cello Suites

Post by rojarosguitar » Tue Apr 17, 2018 8:17 pm

Conall wrote:
Tue Apr 17, 2018 5:08 pm
I like the idea of cello tuning (with the extra 2 normal 1st & 2nd) more than the effect, at least on my guitars. Do you have any particular brand type & tension you recommend for this? I'm a bit nervous of tuning the 3rd G up to A. And the C? On my 8 string I tried CdeGDgAe where 2nd is a B tuned down to A - but it sounds pretty poor.
Using cello tuning in any form obviously has the advantage of matching the open string pedal notes prevalent in the cello suites but makes legato playing (between strings because of the larger stretches) & chords more difficult.
You'll be laughing, but I'm using Daddario EJ46 LP (lightly polished) with a caffee brown compostite g, a seaguar Premier 0.71mm b and Aquila Nylgut e LT. Because some of the strings are below their nominal tension, I have no qualms about tuning the g to a; as long as the net tension of the whole doesn't exceed the usual and the tension isn't distributed to unevenly from side to side I don't see a problem; I'm doing this for quite a long time and never had any problem. Of course, the guitar must kind of support the deep C, nut my Stenzel Enhanced Wood Cedar takes it easily, even down to B below E6, which I also use a lot. For my ears it sound much better not to use extra fat strings for the deep C, somehow the slack C sounds more resonant and interesting in my ears than a usual guitar C string.
Music is a big continent with different landscapes and corners. Some of them I do visit frequently, some from time to time and some I know from hearsay only ...
My Youtube Channel is: TheMusicalEvents

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