D01 Classical guitar lesson 04

The classical guitar lessons are free. They are aimed at the isolated amateur who does not have access to a teacher. To join the class, apply for registration into the students group.
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The classical guitar lessons are free. They are aimed at the isolated amateur who does not have access to a teacher. To join the class, apply for registration into the students group.

PDF, MP3, Vidéos, Lessons : Level D01 - Level D02 - Level D03 - Level D04 - Level D05 - Level D06 - Level D07 - Level D08 - Level D09 - Level D10 - Level D11 - Level D12.
Jules Wilkins
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Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 04

Post by Jules Wilkins » Mon Jan 01, 2018 1:56 am

Ha, caught up, sort of. I just noticed my thumb again. Oops, sloppy me. Oh well, new years day today so maybe I will repost later.



"We all need people who will give us feedback. That’s how we improve." — Bill Gates
"The biggest room in the world is the room for improvement." — unknown

Angela Carter
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Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 04

Post by Angela Carter » Sun Jan 07, 2018 8:33 am

Hello all,
Sorry for my absence. I was sick for a while and then had a hard time getting motivated to get back into it so I’m quite a bit behind. I will be working on it though. It’s great to hear everyone’s progress!

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James A. Showalter
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Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 04

Post by James A. Showalter » Sun Jan 07, 2018 3:23 pm

Happy New Year Angela.

My NY resolution was to get caught up and I think this is the 1st time I will actually achieve one of those futile declarations. But I'm still working on it.

Looking forward to hearing your submissions.
James
1972 Ryoji Matsuoka, NO 18
1990 Takamine C132S
2014 Sakurai Kohno Pro-J
Martin Guitars (D28, MC28, D12-28, J-40)
National Resonator Guitar
Les Paul

Jules Wilkins
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Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 04

Post by Jules Wilkins » Sun Jan 07, 2018 11:15 pm

Welcome back Angela. I joined sometime after your last submission and am glad to hear that you are back at it, and glad to hear you are feeling better. You joined October 1 and presumably had been playing prior to finding this great site, so this advice may or may not apply:
1) Practicing for even 10 to 15 minutes per day, every day, is better than practicing sporadically for long periods of time. I have a bit of difficulty with this observation because it takes me at least 20 minutes just to do warm up exercises, but in fact if that is all you do then you will be steadily improving, especially if you remain focused.
2) It takes at least 2 or 3 months for a habit to become ingrained. In other words, it can take a concerted effort and discipline to sit down and do the 15 minutes on the guitar...but only for the first few months. After that it simply becomes what you do...a normal part of your daily routine.
3) If you only get 10 to 15 minutes of practice you might become discouraged because the warm up exercises are too easy and/or because you are not initially warmed up you don't play the pieces as well as you know you are able. It can even feel like you are getting worse. In this case don't be hard on yourself. Do the pieces slowly and concentrate on one or two elements, such as placing your fingers immediately behind the frets or alternating the tempo to make the music more, well, musical rather than just playing notes. End the session with something you know well and enjoy playing, but try to play it better than you have ever played it before. This is your reward for doing the work. Know that you will progress rapidly and will soon be playing better than you thought possible.
I look forward to hearing your next submissions. :D
"We all need people who will give us feedback. That’s how we improve." — Bill Gates
"The biggest room in the world is the room for improvement." — unknown

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James A. Showalter
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Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 04

Post by James A. Showalter » Tue Jan 09, 2018 1:09 am

Jules,
A simple question: How did you not know about this wonderful website? Or a corollary; How have you progressed so without it?

I've only just imagined myself as a classical guitar player since early on last year. You not only play well and learn fast but you have an inherent philosophy for it and explain it with a teachers voice. And you think musically. I suspect you have other more extensive musical training in your past and are a perfect addition to this group. Unfortunately we have lost quite a few students since the start in September. I suspect it is because this kind of study is hard and can be wrought with frustration as you've described.

Regardless of how, when or why you've managed to join us I think we are all gaining from your participation. I am certainly implementing many of your suggestions into my practice. I can report that I've iterated through a range postures and have come to terms with where I play. It still ain't pretty but seems more "resonant" for me. Now if I could just get to where I play at least 1-hour per day instead of the default 15-minutes.
James
1972 Ryoji Matsuoka, NO 18
1990 Takamine C132S
2014 Sakurai Kohno Pro-J
Martin Guitars (D28, MC28, D12-28, J-40)
National Resonator Guitar
Les Paul

Jules Wilkins
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Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 04

Post by Jules Wilkins » Tue Jan 09, 2018 5:46 am

Hello James:
Essentially I am self-taught, but in addition to having taken no lessons at least three other things held me back. 1) I never practiced much mostly because my wife hated it when I practiced as there was always something else that I was apparently supposed to do that involved her. 2) Most of my playing was on a cheap plywood guitar with high action and buzzing strings which was not only difficult to play but I often injured my fingers and had to stop for long periods of time, and 3) I eventually just stopped trying. However, some years ago while vacationing in Mexico I took a side trip to Paracho where I purchased the best guitar I could find. Unfortunately it mostly just collected dust because soon after I was divorcing my wife and a few years later I remarried and during those years I never picked up my guitar. We recently had our home ransacked and one of the items taken was my good guitar, so as part of the insurance settlement I am having a replacement made. This was the impetus I needed (along with my current wife who has no issues with me practicing), for I figured if I am going to get a new instrument I should at least know how to play it. So I bought an inexpensive guitar that at least has a solid wood top and very little buzzing and started to teach myself once again. But this was not going well, and I was frustrated at the fact that there is not a single guitar piece that I can sit down and play well enough to appease even the most forgiving of audiences as I am determined to do eventually. This is because I have managed to teach myself countless bad habits, which in turn explains both why I am taking these lessons starting at level 1 and why every single lesson has frankly challenged (and humbled) me. But I also have a huge advantage in that I essentially have a giant head start over anyone who is brand new to the instrument which explains why I am able to learn relatively quickly (and why I am now tackling level 2 at the same time...much harder by the way).
I offer advice for three reasons. Firstly it is expected and I certainly appreciate it when someone offers me advice. Secondly the best way to learn something is to teach it, and thirdly if I offer advice to anyone I had better make sure to take my own advice.
I am still working on my posture and have diagnosed that my scoliosis renders it impossibly for me to adopt a standard position. I am now contemplating trading my foot stool for a guitar support.
"We all need people who will give us feedback. That’s how we improve." — Bill Gates
"The biggest room in the world is the room for improvement." — unknown

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James A. Showalter
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Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 04

Post by James A. Showalter » Tue Jan 09, 2018 8:57 pm

Jules,
That's quite a tale. In it I read threads of my own life experience.

I have been looking at your guitar in the videos and there appears to be something about the head that I don't recognize. Do you have an external device like a capo attached or is there something unique about its shape? The angle of your play doesn't give a good view of it. I collect guitars and really study all of the guitars I see here and try to figure out what kind they are. Of course I don't know the names of them but my eye is keen on the quality that is in the instrument.

I agree with you wholeheartedly- The best way to learn something is to teach others.
That's a great philosophy for life as well.
James
1972 Ryoji Matsuoka, NO 18
1990 Takamine C132S
2014 Sakurai Kohno Pro-J
Martin Guitars (D28, MC28, D12-28, J-40)
National Resonator Guitar
Les Paul

Jules Wilkins
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Posts: 154
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Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 04

Post by Jules Wilkins » Wed Jan 10, 2018 1:43 am

Hello James
That is my Snark which I leave clamped onto my guitar head. It is a tuning device that senses the guitar's vibrations.
I broke down and purchased the Sagework Atlas Magnetic Guitar Support today along with an extra set of magnets. I am cautiously optimistic that this will eliminate my back pain and enable me to find a posture and guitar position that will enable both hands to be correctly positioned. Here's hoping...
"We all need people who will give us feedback. That’s how we improve." — Bill Gates
"The biggest room in the world is the room for improvement." — unknown

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James A. Showalter
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Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 04

Post by James A. Showalter » Wed Jan 10, 2018 1:56 am

Jules,
I am looking forward to seeing you use the guitar support. Alas, you will assume the posture of teacher and I will learn from your efforts.
James
1972 Ryoji Matsuoka, NO 18
1990 Takamine C132S
2014 Sakurai Kohno Pro-J
Martin Guitars (D28, MC28, D12-28, J-40)
National Resonator Guitar
Les Paul

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James A. Showalter
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Location: Mississippi

Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 04

Post by James A. Showalter » Mon Jan 22, 2018 2:57 pm

Making progress slowly - Here are my Lesson-4 submissions:

La Cucaracha:


Allouette, Gentille Allouette:


Lundi Matin:


The interesting thing about Lundi Matin is that the musical score indicates that the notes played on the A & D strings should be executed using the thumb. Most all of the videos I reviewed, including the introductory piece by JFD, play the notes using the index and middle fingers. Tales Lucin is the only other person I reviewed playing these lower notes using the thumb.

Cadet Rouselle:


It appears I will remain about one month in arrears.
James
1972 Ryoji Matsuoka, NO 18
1990 Takamine C132S
2014 Sakurai Kohno Pro-J
Martin Guitars (D28, MC28, D12-28, J-40)
National Resonator Guitar
Les Paul

Jules Wilkins
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Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 04

Post by Jules Wilkins » Wed Jan 24, 2018 1:34 am

James:
I was so excited to hear your latest submissions. I was beginning to fear we lost you.
1) Could you possibly post a short video showing what movement is possible in you right wrist? I would love to offer helpful advice if possible, but I cannot see how it would be possible without clearly knowing what you are up against.
2) It seems to me that your posture and hand positions are steadily improving with every new submission. Good job on that! I suspect as time progresses you will continue to adjust as you learn about your own body. It is certainly true of me.
3) There must be a spider or something on your ceiling, because two of your fingers insist on pointing there when not fretting a note :lol: I know you have been working on this. What I do not know is whether or not you have found an exercise that allows you to focus on making the correction automatic. I suggest the chromatic scale, starting with just the top three strings but ultimately aiming for all 6. Force your fingers to stay where you put them until absolutely needed somewhere else. Ultimately that is not good practice for they should release all pressure when not required while remaining in the ready position, hovering no more than half an inch above the strings. But until you can train them to stay on the strings they can hardly be expected to hover above them at the ready. Do this and similar exercises every day, possibly starting in a higher position where the strings are closer together, thus avoiding the reach development aspect that this exercise is also good for. Do however concentrate on using finger tips only (no finger pads) located just behind the frets using the minimum force required to render a clear note. Go as slow as needed. The goal is to train the left hand fingers until this becomes automatic. Not an easy task, but a necessary one.
"We all need people who will give us feedback. That’s how we improve." — Bill Gates
"The biggest room in the world is the room for improvement." — unknown

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John Montes
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Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 04

Post by John Montes » Wed Jan 24, 2018 4:42 am

James A. Showalter wrote:
Mon Jan 22, 2018 2:57 pm
Making progress slowly - Here are my Lesson-4 submissions:
You are doing pretty
There are some spots here and there where the timing and flow can be tightened up with more practice

The Lundi Matin looks like a piece that can be used as a thumb exercise study when playing the notes on the A & D string with (p) and using (i) & (m) for all other strings, or it can be played entirely using (i) & (m) alternation on all strings.

I've not had a chance to check archive lessons to see if a clarification on this may have been answered in the past. One could learn to play it using both approaches and get multiple and unique exercises out of the same.

There are some cases where you will encounter study/exercise pieces in classical guitar repertoire where the artist, publisher, and or editor may indicate multiple plucking hand alternation combinations that are meant to be performed as independent "physical" variations of the piece for exercise purposes, but musically the notes are the same.

I've seen this several times in the past in various method or technique books.

One recent example I remember is from the D05 workbook, I recall a tremolo study where the bass-line and middle voices are played with thumb (p) and the melody line is meant to be practiced in three physical variations such as: ami, ima, and imi combinations. One of the select alternation combinations is used entirely through-out, then during another iteration of the piece, the alternation method is changed.
2001 Vicente Carrillo 1a Rio
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James A. Showalter
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Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 04

Post by James A. Showalter » Fri Jan 26, 2018 9:52 pm

To begin let me thank Jules and John for their valued explanations and critique. I really appreciate that my efforts are received with such interest. The feedback is most useful and is in fact the best part of the Delcamp experience. Each of you takes that to heart and it shows in your contributions.

I've been away since just after my submissions and have only played once while I was gone. I take the Takamine as my travel guitar whenever possible but finding the time is almost not possible. I went ahead and submitted my 4 pieces before my departure even though my recordings are less than what I hope for as a standard. Although not evident in the recordings I felt that at least one time before I had played each piece better than what I submitted. I was especially saddened to see those two fingers pointing out as they do when I had practiced for the opposite effect. I swear that once the recording starts something out of my control takes over. And yes, Jules, I have found an exercise that 100% alleviates the tendency. I demonstrated it in my repeat of Lesson-3; a rubber band binding the 1st and 3rd digits into proper position. I have been practicing the chromatic scale and other lessons trying to develop the constant muscle memory for holding the fingers in position. I'm confident one day it will be second nature but as you see it remains a struggle for me. And as for the amount of articulation in my right wrist it is 0%. The fusion resulted in a titanium plate being installed from near the base of the thumb where it is attached to the index and middle finger bones of the hand extending into the arm connecting to both bones of the forearm ( the ulna and the radius ). This results in me having to modify all of the motion for the thumb to be executed by moving the thumb so that it can reache each string. As a result I have tried to accommodate various postures of convenience but I am realizing the natural playing position for me is leaning towards that of a cello player. There could be worse things in life besides being a confused celloist who plays classical guitar.

Your critiques have me motivated. I will address my tardiness and lesson-5 immediately.
James
1972 Ryoji Matsuoka, NO 18
1990 Takamine C132S
2014 Sakurai Kohno Pro-J
Martin Guitars (D28, MC28, D12-28, J-40)
National Resonator Guitar
Les Paul

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Ken Kim
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Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 04

Post by Ken Kim » Sun Mar 04, 2018 3:09 am

It was way easier than first 3 lessons. Guess I'm getting used well to do rest stroke and dampening. I thought it would take at least 3-4 days to put 01-04 submissions but here I am posting 01-04 submissions. Any feedback is wecome.

La Cucaracha

Alouette, Gentille Alouette

Lundi Matin

Cadet Rousselle
Ken

Sore Fingers & Mind in heaven
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Jules Wilkins
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Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 04

Post by Jules Wilkins » Mon Mar 05, 2018 3:16 am

Not too much to say here as you are clearly whipping through these lessons. On your left hand your fingers are mostly fretting with their tips, but your pinky is definitely fretting with the pad. It is very important to fret with finger tips only just behind the frets with as little pressure as is necessary to get a clear note. This is a very common mistake for us beginners to make and a hard one to correct...believe me I am still struggling. I find chromatic scale exercises helpful played slowly but perfectly.
"We all need people who will give us feedback. That’s how we improve." — Bill Gates
"The biggest room in the world is the room for improvement." — unknown

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