D01 Classical guitar lesson 05

The classical guitar lessons are free. They are aimed at the isolated amateur who does not have access to a teacher. To join the class, apply for registration into the students group.
Forum rules
The classical guitar lessons are free. They are aimed at the isolated amateur who does not have access to a teacher. To join the class, apply for registration into the students group.

PDF, MP3, Vidéos, Lessons : Level D01 - Level D02 - Level D03 - Level D04 - Level D05 - Level D06 - Level D07 - Level D08 - Level D09 - Level D10 - Level D11 - Level D12.
User avatar
Jean-François Delcamp
Administrator
Administrator
Posts: 4387
Joined: Sun May 30, 2004 7:49 pm
Location: Brest, France

D01 Classical guitar lesson 05

Post by Jean-François Delcamp » Thu Jan 04, 2018 1:04 pm

Hello everyone,
Please start by downloading the latest version of volume D01.
If you are new to the course, please read this message to familiarize yourself with the conditions for participating in the lessons. You should also read the first message in lesson 1, where you will find advice on how to make the most of your study time and on the methods of practising that I recommend.



First we will study some technical exercises from volume D01.
These exercises will work upon the technique of simultaneous rest strokes (apoyando) with the thumb and index finger, and also with the thumb and middle finger.
The rest stroke is a way to play the string with a finger movement which plucks the string and then continues to move until it comes to rest on the adjacent string. Working on this technique will allow you to discover the best position for your plucking hand (the right hand if you are right-handed).
If you are already used to plucking the strings with free strokes, the simultaneous rest strokes with the thumb and a finger will seem difficult to you, even impossible. But be assured, with patience and perseverence, this difficulty will be resolved in 30 minutes. I know from experience that the first tries are truly discouraging, particularly for adults. It is for this reason that I wish to reassure you in advance, take heart, you will be able to do it.
Page 26 : Jean-François Delcamp - Polyphony
Page 58 : Jean-François Delcamp - Rest stroke, number 15.






Finally, we'll look at 4 simple tunes, pages 27 to 28. These tunes will work upon the technique of simultaneous rest strokes (apoyando) with the thumb and index finger, and also with the thumb and middle finger.
Antonio Cano-Curriella : Leccion I (Rest stroke)
Pascual Roch : Exercices de simple alternation (Rest stroke) [No video provided]
Anonyme : Donne-moi la fleur (Rest stroke)





I ask you first to work on all these exercises and tunes for a week and then to upload your recordings of:
Jean-François Delcamp : Polyphonie, numero 2 (Rest stroke)
Antonio Cano-Curriella : Leccion I (Rest stroke)
Pascual Roch (1860-1921) : Exercices de simple alternation (Rest stroke)


Good luck!


I thank Geoff (GeoffB) who has helped in the translation of my lessons into English.


Jean-François

---

Exam Qualifying submissions:

Polyphonie
Leccion I
Exercices de simple alternation

Jules Wilkins
Polyphonie
Exercices de simple alternation
Leccion I

James A. Showalter
Polyphonie
Leccion I
Exercices de simple alternation

Yucel Kamcez
Polyphonie
Leccion I
Exercices de simple alternation

Ken Kim
Polyphonie
Leccion I
Exercices de simple alternation

Juan M Silva
Polyphonie
Leccion I
Exercices de simple alternation

MikeTaylor
Polyphonie
Leccion I
Exercices de simple alternation
:( + ♫ = :)

Jules Wilkins
Student of the online lessons
Posts: 154
Joined: Mon Dec 11, 2017 10:12 pm

Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 05

Post by Jules Wilkins » Fri Jan 05, 2018 7:04 am

As there are no video's posted on the simple alteration exercises I thought I would lead off with them even though I haven't practiced them for the week. If anyone has any doubts as to how to count them I hope I did a good enough job to at least get the general idea across. I could have done the triplets better for sure.

.
"We all need people who will give us feedback. That’s how we improve." — Bill Gates
"The biggest room in the world is the room for improvement." — unknown

Jules Wilkins
Student of the online lessons
Posts: 154
Joined: Mon Dec 11, 2017 10:12 pm

Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 05

Post by Jules Wilkins » Mon Jan 08, 2018 4:56 am

Here are my remaining submissions:


This next one I initially found very easy until I added the damping. I was initially quite confused...how can one damp the 6th string with p while playing the 5th string with p at the same time? Was this an error? Did the author have two left thumbs? Then I recalled watching a video about playing the rest stroke with the thumb where an essential element was to use the string you hit as a spring board. While this has not been explained (that I noticed at least) in these lessons it is exactly what DeCamp does. He pushes his thumb through the 5th string, it bounces off the 4th string and finally comes to rest on the 6th string thus damping it. That is a brand new skill to learn and I don't yet have it down pat. This then is only my first submission of Leccion 6. I will continue to practice it 'till I get it right and then try to bring it up to the required tempo before posting an updated attempt. Not such an easy piece after all. :?
"We all need people who will give us feedback. That’s how we improve." — Bill Gates
"The biggest room in the world is the room for improvement." — unknown

User avatar
James A. Showalter
Student of the online lessons
Posts: 153
Joined: Wed Mar 15, 2017 10:20 pm
Location: Mississippi

Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 05

Post by James A. Showalter » Thu Jan 11, 2018 12:42 am

Jules,
Thanks for taking the lead. I am not surprised to find you at the front.

Good work with that dancing thumb.

I hope to catch up this weekend.
James
1972 Ryoji Matsuoka, NO 18
1990 Takamine C132S
2014 Sakurai Kohno Pro-J
Martin Guitars (D28, MC28, D12-28, J-40)
National Resonator Guitar
Les Paul

Grayson Bray Morris
Student of the online lessons
Posts: 32
Joined: Wed Sep 06, 2017 10:04 am
Location: Netherlands

Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 05

Post by Grayson Bray Morris » Sun Jan 14, 2018 9:43 am

I'm going to bow out of the remainder of the lessons. I've been resisting the fact that my schedule is too full, and something needs to make way. Thanks to everyone for the encouraging and valuable feedback you've given me, and best of luck to all of you going forward!
Much madness is divinest sense, to a discerning eye; much sense, the starkest madness. --Emily Dickinson

Jules Wilkins
Student of the online lessons
Posts: 154
Joined: Mon Dec 11, 2017 10:12 pm

Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 05

Post by Jules Wilkins » Sun Jan 14, 2018 10:07 pm

I'm going to bow out of the remainder of the lessons. I've been resisting the fact that my schedule is too full, and something needs to make way. Thanks to everyone for the encouraging and valuable feedback you've given me, and best of luck to all of you going forward!
Grayson: I for one am sorry to see you bow out. I understand however that one must set ones priorities and I applaud the fact that you took the time to excuse yourself. Very mature and thoughtful.
I don't think I ever commented on any of your playing, basically because I started late, but I will offer my 2 cents now because there is an off chance that my advice may have been a contributing factor in your decision as to which activities had to be axed, or at least relegated to the back burner.
1) These initial lessons can be extremely frustrating to a beginner. You need to put in what seems like a ton of work and the reward of being able to play a beautiful piece of music well seem so far away. Delcamp really throws the learner into the deep end by telling us to damp notes instead of just letting them ring on, making the exercises that much more difficult. If and when you restart, take a boo at some if the student's submissions in D05 and know that you are well on your way to achieving at least that level, but to reach that height you need a firm foundation which is what Delcamp is offering.
2) In your case you made it far more difficult because you were trying to use a Phillips screwdriver to turn a Roberson screw. With persistence and a keen awareness of what you were attempting you may have advanced well enough, but make no mistake. A steel string acoustic guitar is not a classical guitar. They look similar and share many traits, but they are totally different. I have picked up an acoustic guitar thinking I might be able to play a piece only to find that I cannot. The feel of the instrument is vastly different. The acoustic is great for campfires...nice and loud with a clear sound, but I doubt that even the likes of Tatyana Ryzhkova could make beautiful music with a steel string. Yes there are great musicians who play steel strings, but they play a different type of music which doesn't interest me and this is the wrong site to be on to learn that instrument. I am frustrated with the guitar that I am using now because it is a low end model, but it is a classical guitar with a solid cedar top and a very good choice for a beginner student. I am sure if all I had was a steel string I would have given up long ago.
If you love classical music then I encourage you to not give up. Get a good classical guitar (not necessarily a great one, but one well suited to a beginner student) and try to fit in that 15 to 20 minutes per day. Our minds need exercise to stave off later problems in life, and this is one of the best forms.
Best of luck.
"We all need people who will give us feedback. That’s how we improve." — Bill Gates
"The biggest room in the world is the room for improvement." — unknown

User avatar
James A. Showalter
Student of the online lessons
Posts: 153
Joined: Wed Mar 15, 2017 10:20 pm
Location: Mississippi

Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 05

Post by James A. Showalter » Wed Jan 17, 2018 12:27 am

Grayson,
It has been a pleasure spending this brief time learning guitar with you. If it's any consolation I can admit to having the same difficulty with time management that you describe. I feel bad that I've fallen behind. Even though I have the right guitar and really appreciate the opportunity the Delcamp experience provides and practice hard I find the frustration of trying to be perfect almost defeating at times. I realize that I will likely not finish this year's lesson with an appropriate degree of perfection at the DO1 level. So if you find the time and spirit to readdress your commitment then you'll find me here repeating DO1 next year. I think a bit of remedial is required for me so I'll be around for awhile just plugging along. I'll miss you as I do the others who have departed this band of pickers but I do appreciate the manner of your exit. It speaks highly of your character.

Take care.
James
1972 Ryoji Matsuoka, NO 18
1990 Takamine C132S
2014 Sakurai Kohno Pro-J
Martin Guitars (D28, MC28, D12-28, J-40)
National Resonator Guitar
Les Paul

User avatar
John Montes
Moderator
Moderator
Posts: 790
Joined: Mon Oct 27, 2014 12:20 am
Location: North Texas

Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 05

Post by John Montes » Thu Jan 18, 2018 1:42 am

Grayson we will miss you, and you were progressing well.
Come back when you are able.
2001 Vicente Carrillo 1a Rio
1998 German Rubio Vazquez Estudio
2015 Cordoba Solista
2012 Cordoba C7
La Bella & D'Addario Strings

Jules Wilkins
Student of the online lessons
Posts: 154
Joined: Mon Dec 11, 2017 10:12 pm

Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 05

Post by Jules Wilkins » Sun Jan 21, 2018 9:13 pm

I promised a better rendition once I practiced it more.
The damping with the thumb is almost automatic now, but I need to keep practicing. Still, when I consider that I could barely do a rest stroke with the thumb about 6 weeks ago let alone damping a string immediately afterwards I have to be appreciative of these lessons.
I am a little concerned that nobody else has made their submissions. I get that people do lesson 1 and maybe lesson 2 and then simply quit, but to all you who have made it to lessons 3 (most of whom have also submitted material in lesson 4) you guys are doing great without exception and I would hate to see any of you drop out. We don't have to be perfect here, and as we all come from different places we are all going to struggle in our own unique ways, but we are all progressing and owe it to ourselves to persevere. Sure it can be a bit disheartening that we cannot yet master Recuerdos De La Alhambra despite all the work we have thus far put in, but through perseverance we will be able to master this first year and that is already enough to be able to play more than a few pleasing pieces of music well. I really hope none of you are giving up on me.

By the way, I now have my Atlas Guitar Support. It took me a couple of days to find a position that allows both hands to be in at least approach a good position. I think I now need to do some resistance training, concentrating on the shoulders and back, which should in turn help my posture and further improve my left hand position.
[media]https://youtu.be/ywEgAyAA75g[/media]
"We all need people who will give us feedback. That’s how we improve." — Bill Gates
"The biggest room in the world is the room for improvement." — unknown

User avatar
James A. Showalter
Student of the online lessons
Posts: 153
Joined: Wed Mar 15, 2017 10:20 pm
Location: Mississippi

Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 05

Post by James A. Showalter » Sat Jan 27, 2018 1:58 am

Jules,
You are a cheerleader amongst us. I, for one, appreciate your critiques and promise that though I may not at all reach a standard deserving of completion of the Delcamp 1st year I will make it to the exits.

Now a bit of review for Antonio Cano Curriellqa: The music is beautiful and I am looking forward to playing it. With respect to your submission I can only suggest that you move your plucking towards the sound hole. In this respect you are just like me - I play closer to the bridge. But I know from the perspective of physics and I've experimented and tried to train myself that the source position is as important as the frequency content in terms of robustness. Experiment on your own and concentrate on playing the piece at different positions relative to the sound hole. Produce a recording 1st of you plucking the strings concentrating on executing directly over the sound hole. Now compare that recording with what you have here. Tonally your submission is very good. But if you compare it with playing the same way directly over the sound hole you will realize a difference. This difference will be in amplitude or really what were talking about is individual character expressed through the music. The change in amplitude should not be a function of plucking strength if I can invent a way of describing source strength on a classical guitar. This changes the entire robustness of the piece. Being able to control where you play above, below and over the sound hole will add a dimension of tonality that we are not seeing by continually playing at the convenient spot for us on the guitar. In short, own the strings. On my guitars the scale length is 52 cm long. Like you I am getting stuck playing at 45.

james
Last edited by James A. Showalter on Sat Jan 27, 2018 9:53 am, edited 1 time in total.
1972 Ryoji Matsuoka, NO 18
1990 Takamine C132S
2014 Sakurai Kohno Pro-J
Martin Guitars (D28, MC28, D12-28, J-40)
National Resonator Guitar
Les Paul

Jules Wilkins
Student of the online lessons
Posts: 154
Joined: Mon Dec 11, 2017 10:12 pm

Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 05

Post by Jules Wilkins » Sat Jan 27, 2018 7:14 am

Hello James. Thanks for the input. You are quite correct, that should not be my default right hand position. It seems to have gravitated there with the use of the support. I will give this some serious thought over the next few weeks. Stay tuned...
"We all need people who will give us feedback. That’s how we improve." — Bill Gates
"The biggest room in the world is the room for improvement." — unknown

User avatar
James A. Showalter
Student of the online lessons
Posts: 153
Joined: Wed Mar 15, 2017 10:20 pm
Location: Mississippi

Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 05

Post by James A. Showalter » Fri Feb 02, 2018 4:50 pm

Toe the line Birddog - I'm following up your trail.
1972 Ryoji Matsuoka, NO 18
1990 Takamine C132S
2014 Sakurai Kohno Pro-J
Martin Guitars (D28, MC28, D12-28, J-40)
National Resonator Guitar
Les Paul

User avatar
James A. Showalter
Student of the online lessons
Posts: 153
Joined: Wed Mar 15, 2017 10:20 pm
Location: Mississippi

Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 05

Post by James A. Showalter » Tue Feb 06, 2018 12:40 am

Jules,
Here I am guessing again. The piece Antonio Cano-Curriella : Leccion I has a G#, but no other #'s. So I suspect the G# may be an addition. Is the piece in Am?
1972 Ryoji Matsuoka, NO 18
1990 Takamine C132S
2014 Sakurai Kohno Pro-J
Martin Guitars (D28, MC28, D12-28, J-40)
National Resonator Guitar
Les Paul

User avatar
John Montes
Moderator
Moderator
Posts: 790
Joined: Mon Oct 27, 2014 12:20 am
Location: North Texas

Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 05

Post by John Montes » Tue Feb 06, 2018 2:16 am

The Antonia Cano-Curriella piece is in A minor, the key signature throughout (no sharps or flats) is used for C major and A Minor.

The piece primarily moves between I, V, IV (A, E, D) bass lines with melody lines from the A minor scale, and the G# accidental in a few places borrowed from A harmonic minor.
2001 Vicente Carrillo 1a Rio
1998 German Rubio Vazquez Estudio
2015 Cordoba Solista
2012 Cordoba C7
La Bella & D'Addario Strings

User avatar
James A. Showalter
Student of the online lessons
Posts: 153
Joined: Wed Mar 15, 2017 10:20 pm
Location: Mississippi

Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 05

Post by James A. Showalter » Wed Feb 07, 2018 11:04 am

Thank you John.

Your explanation is just the level of understanding I was trying to find. I knew the G# had to have been borrowed from a supporting scale but had no clue. Understanding for the movement structure was also lingering in my mind but not near enough to the surface to ask the question.
1972 Ryoji Matsuoka, NO 18
1990 Takamine C132S
2014 Sakurai Kohno Pro-J
Martin Guitars (D28, MC28, D12-28, J-40)
National Resonator Guitar
Les Paul

Return to “On-line classical guitar lessons”