D01 Classical guitar lesson 05

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The classical guitar lessons are free. They are aimed at the isolated amateur who does not have access to a teacher. To join the class, apply for registration into the students group.

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Jules Wilkins
Student of the online lessons
Posts: 107
Joined: Mon Dec 11, 2017 10:12 pm

Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 05

Post by Jules Wilkins » Wed Feb 07, 2018 8:39 pm

James A. Showalter wrote:
Tue Feb 06, 2018 12:40 am
Jules,
Here I am guessing again. The piece Antonio Cano-Curriella : Leccion I has a G#, but no other #'s. So I suspect the G# may be an addition. Is the piece in Am?
As you seem to already be clear on, one cannot tell what key a piece is being played in by looking at the key signature, because every key signature is used by two keys, one major key and one minor key, which are said to be relatives. As this signature has no sharps or flats it is either CM or Am. Because both keys use the same signature one must then look at the music itself. Often a piece will start and end with a triad chord, such as CM (CEG) or Am (ACE) which will nail the key. This piece opens with two A's (an octave apart), but as John points out, continues with melody lines as opposed to a chord. Still, starting with two A's strongly suggests that the piece is written in Am as opposed to CM.
To further complicate matters, there are three minor keys. Am natural has no sharps or flats. Am melodic sharpens the 6th and 7th notes (F & G) when ascending but reverts to the key signature when descending. Finally, Am harmonic sharpens the 7th (G) throughout while leaving the 6th untouched. You will notice in this piece that G is never played natural but rather is always sharpened whether assenting or descending while F is always left natural. Hence, again as John notes, the key is clearly Am harmonic.
Alas, I am digging into a shallow knowledge pit here having never studied music theory. I do know for example that GM is related to CM and as GM sharpens the F you might find a piece where the key signature is that of CM (and Am) and the key is CM but it wanders off into GM for a spell, and indeed Delcamp give us an example in D02, lesson 5, http://www.classicalguitardelcamp.com/v ... f=41&t=670 so without knowing what is happening one might be initially puzzled by the presence of F#, but I digress. Hopefully my explanation is basically sound and/or someone will correct me.
"We all need people who will give us feedback. That’s how we improve." — Bill Gates
"The biggest room in the world is the room for improvement." — unknown

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James A. Showalter
Student of the online lessons
Posts: 113
Joined: Wed Mar 15, 2017 10:20 pm
Location: Mississippi

Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 05

Post by James A. Showalter » Thu Feb 08, 2018 2:40 pm

Jules,
I, like yourself am self-taught in all of my understanding of music; which is slight. I have digested enough to realize that what you tell is correct. The tricky part for me is recalling the details about the various scale types, in this case the flavors of minor (natural, melodic & harmonic). Hopefully, now that I've seen an application involving them their meaning will stick and I can move on to a better understanding of the other part of your explanation. Realizing when a supporting scale in a particular piece comes into play requires a fundamental perception of the key signature components and having the wherewithal to know when they are being applied. I will never develop the kind of technique that is required to be a competent classical guitarist. I am too old and in some sense broken, but not in spirit. I am here to learn music and guitar. These discussions nurture that quest within me and I am thankful for yours and John's and all of the rest who remain as contributors to this forum as participants. It keeps me young.
James
1990 Takamine C132S
2014 Sakurai Kohno Pro-J
Martin Guitars (D28, MC28, D12-28, J-40)
National Resonator Guitar
Les Paul

Jules Wilkins
Student of the online lessons
Posts: 107
Joined: Mon Dec 11, 2017 10:12 pm

Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 05

Post by Jules Wilkins » Thu Feb 08, 2018 4:18 pm

James A. Showalter wrote:
Thu Feb 08, 2018 2:40 pm
I will never develop the kind of technique that is required to be a competent classical guitarist. I am too old and in some sense broken, but not in spirit.
Hey, at least nobody will accuse you of too much arching in the right hand!
I do not know your age and it is true enough I think that it is easier to absorb knowledge and train muscles when one is young. Against that, drive and persistence that comes with maturity can make up for a great deal. I am 63 years old and I sometimes find myself forgetting a word and it concerns me somewhat. Research shows that our minds require exercise to remain healthy with diet also playing its role. How do we exercise our minds? Three ways are generally suggested. Learn a language, play games that involve solving complex problems, and learning an instrument. For me that means learning Mandarin and Spanish, playing duplicate bridge and studying the guitar. I have just recently read that my penchant for sweet foods is bad for my brain as well as my obvious gut.
So OK, we will likely not become the next John Williams, but we can certainly learn to play well enough. You are not too old.
The only relevant question is whether you are steadily improving. Some days it will not feel like that, but that is OK. Keep up the effort and you will reap the rewards which includes a better overall state of mental health and quality of life. Don't put yourself down. You can do this.
"We all need people who will give us feedback. That’s how we improve." — Bill Gates
"The biggest room in the world is the room for improvement." — unknown

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James A. Showalter
Student of the online lessons
Posts: 113
Joined: Wed Mar 15, 2017 10:20 pm
Location: Mississippi

Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 05

Post by James A. Showalter » Sun Feb 11, 2018 12:34 am

My shortfall is in completing all of the supporting music that is a part of each lesson. I address the required pieces but do not give the full suite of lessons its just due. As a result my progress is less than what a fully dedicated student would achieve. I have my excuses - the job, travel, the rest of life. I knew when I signed up that it would be difficult to keep up and do this properly. Oh well.

The good news is that this is my last year to blame any shortfalls in life on work.

I'll submit the January lessons in the coming days.
James
1990 Takamine C132S
2014 Sakurai Kohno Pro-J
Martin Guitars (D28, MC28, D12-28, J-40)
National Resonator Guitar
Les Paul

Yucel Kamcez
Student of the online lessons
Posts: 22
Joined: Mon Oct 02, 2017 12:22 pm

Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 05

Post by Yucel Kamcez » Mon Feb 19, 2018 12:42 pm

Hi,
I couldn't send anything to share, so sorry for that. I lived some health problems last month and i had heavy workload this month, so it became a serious barrier to me for playing. If this lesson will stay open for a few days i'll try to share...

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