D01 Classical guitar lesson 01

The classical guitar lessons are free. They are aimed at the isolated amateur who does not have access to a teacher. To join the class, apply for registration into the students group.
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The classical guitar lessons are free. They are aimed at the isolated amateur who does not have access to a teacher. To join the class, apply for registration into the students group.

PDF, MP3, Vidéos, Lessons : Level D01 - Level D02 - Level D03 - Level D04 - Level D05 - Level D06 - Level D07 - Level D08 - Level D09 - Level D10 - Level D11 - Level D12.
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Mike Cook
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Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 01

Post by Mike Cook » Mon Sep 10, 2018 12:06 pm

Cordes a Vides No. 1 Week One

I was a little overwhelmed about learning the video process! I should have spent more time practicing this more before posting. It will be better at the end of the month.

Last edited by Mike Cook on Mon Sep 10, 2018 3:18 pm, edited 1 time in total.
2019 Elias Bonet Monne Traditional Cedar/Green Ebony
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Mike Cook
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Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 01

Post by Mike Cook » Mon Sep 10, 2018 12:07 pm

Cordes a Vides No. 2
2019 Elias Bonet Monne Traditional Cedar/Green Ebony
2017 Cordoba 20th Anniversary Guitar
1993 Jose Ramirez R2
2008 Fender Strat, Eric Johnson Signature Model
1966 Gibson Melodymaker
2013 Gibson Songwriter Deluxe EC Studio

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Mike Cook
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Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 01

Post by Mike Cook » Mon Sep 10, 2018 12:09 pm

D01 Week One - Old Mac Donald

Putting the rests into this made a simple tune challenging!


Last edited by Mike Cook on Mon Sep 10, 2018 3:15 pm, edited 1 time in total.
2019 Elias Bonet Monne Traditional Cedar/Green Ebony
2017 Cordoba 20th Anniversary Guitar
1993 Jose Ramirez R2
2008 Fender Strat, Eric Johnson Signature Model
1966 Gibson Melodymaker
2013 Gibson Songwriter Deluxe EC Studio

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Mike Cook
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Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 01

Post by Mike Cook » Mon Sep 10, 2018 12:12 pm

D01 - Week One - Au Claire de la Lune
2019 Elias Bonet Monne Traditional Cedar/Green Ebony
2017 Cordoba 20th Anniversary Guitar
1993 Jose Ramirez R2
2008 Fender Strat, Eric Johnson Signature Model
1966 Gibson Melodymaker
2013 Gibson Songwriter Deluxe EC Studio

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John Montes
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Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 01

Post by John Montes » Mon Sep 10, 2018 12:22 pm

Welcome all D01 students, I'll be catching up on threads today and tomorrow evening and will update the tracker list where we list student submissions that have been reviewed and qualify for exam participation requirements.

Happy plucking!!
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William Byrd
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Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 01

Post by William Byrd » Mon Sep 10, 2018 9:01 pm

Very solid first effort Charles. Your left hand seemed very relaxed and perhaps some tension in the right hand, something I most definitely struggle with as well. I’m guessing that perhaps you already can read music? Welcome and continue the wonderful work. It sounded great.
Last edited by William Byrd on Tue Sep 11, 2018 3:15 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Ian Howe
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Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 01

Post by Ian Howe » Mon Sep 10, 2018 9:48 pm

Hi Charles,
very good effort,
There is not much i can say about the technique, i think it looks quiet good actually. I would just suggest increasing the tempo a little just to make sound a little more musical. Overall well done.

I'm going to be doing a re-post in a day or 2, whats generaly don. Leave the original post & new post or amend the original links?
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James A. Showalter
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Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 01

Post by James A. Showalter » Mon Sep 10, 2018 11:15 pm

Charles,
Very nice. You made the dampening look easy. If anything I agree with Ian and think perhaps the pace on Old Mac Donald and Au Claire de la Lune could be sped up. And I agree from the looks of your playing room that you are up to speed on sight reading music.
James
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William Byrd
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Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 01

Post by William Byrd » Tue Sep 11, 2018 3:17 am

Ian Howe wrote:
Mon Sep 10, 2018 9:48 pm
I'm going to be doing a re-post in a day or 2, whats generaly don. Leave the original post & new post or amend the original links?
I would say leave the original up so we can see a comparison. I plan to do the same in a week or so.
1966 Kazuo Yairi Uzuki
1967 Sadao Yairi Seijin
1971 Mitsuru Tamura No 600

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James A. Showalter
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Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 01

Post by James A. Showalter » Tue Sep 11, 2018 9:26 am

So I'm still trying to get a grip on tempo. The metronome is the standard and I tried it for Au Clair de la Lune which should be played at 168 bpm. If I listen to the beats of a metronome at that rate it just creates chaos in my mind. So I started working on piece below it in the D01 lessons that is also in 4/4-time, Il Est Minuit, which is a bit more simple and should be played at 152 bpm. To minimize the beat driven chaos I halved the rate to 76 bpm which would equate to a metronome beat for each half-note. It seemed more manageable to me. Now I'm thinking that I'll continue working the piece and set the metronome for 36 bpm which would equate to a beat for each whole note or equivalently to the length of one measure. Does anybody know if there is a standard for using a metronome and if partial referencing is something that is regularly done? Am I confused as to what is the applicable beat value assigned to a piece (i.e. I assume a piece played at 152 bpm has a single beat for each 1/4-note in 4/4-time)?
James
1972 Morris No. 12
1973 Ryoji Matsuoka, No. 20
2014 Sakurai Kohno Pro-J
Martin Guitars (MC28, D12-28, J40)
National Resonator Guitar
Les Paul 1960 reissue

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Christopher Langley
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Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 01

Post by Christopher Langley » Tue Sep 11, 2018 12:45 pm

James A. Showalter wrote:
Tue Sep 11, 2018 9:26 am
So I'm still trying to get a grip on tempo.
James, you can set the metronome to any value you want and it will still work. No need to try to halve values. You can play the pieces at any tempo you want. I recommend as fast as you can go without making mistakes.

I typically start around 60bpm for any given piece. Not too fast, not too slow. Sometimes too slow can be a challenge too.

In summary, just keep messing with it. If it feels too fast, it is. If it feels too slow, it is. Tweak the click to your hearts delight. I usually move it by around 4-5 bpm at a time.

Keep working at it.

Chris

Edit

I just realized what you are actually asking. My bad.

I don't see any reason why you couldn't do this with the faster pieces. I think I will give it a try myself James.
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Judy Verbeeten
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Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 01

Post by Judy Verbeeten » Tue Sep 11, 2018 1:12 pm

Charles Cook wrote:
Mon Sep 10, 2018 12:06 pm

I was a little overwhelmed about learning the video process! I should have spent more time practicing this more before posting. It will be better at the end of the month.
Charles, well done. Good note clarity and musicality. Yes, perhaps the tempo was a bit slow. But hey, my farmer in Old MacDonald was also a bit tired - matched the player's (my) physicality. The increased tempo will definitely come with repeated efforts and time.

The clarity of your notes were, of course, related to your playing, but also I am wondering what kind of audio set-up you used, i.e., what microphone. I have asked other classmates that question also, to ascertain what is out there. I am using an AudioTechnica 2020USBi microphone which I just plug directly into the ipad and that's it.

P.S. The grand baby and the violin in the background suggests the classical guitar is not your only musical interest. Wow.

Judy

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Rick Beauregard
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Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 01

Post by Rick Beauregard » Tue Sep 11, 2018 3:45 pm

James A. Showalter wrote:
Tue Sep 11, 2018 9:26 am
So I'm still trying to get a grip on tempo. The metronome is the standard and I tried it for Au Clair de la Lune which should be played at 168 bpm. If I listen to the beats of a metronome at that rate it just creates chaos in my mind. So I started working on piece below it in the D01 lessons that is also in 4/4-time, Il Est Minuit, which is a bit more simple and should be played at 152 bpm. To minimize the beat driven chaos I halved the rate to 76 bpm which would equate to a metronome beat for each half-note. It seemed more manageable to me. Now I'm thinking that I'll continue working the piece and set the metronome for 36 bpm which would equate to a beat for each whole note or equivalently to the length of one measure. Does anybody know if there is a standard for using a metronome and if partial referencing is something that is regularly done? Am I confused as to what is the applicable beat value assigned to a piece (i.e. I assume a piece played at 152 bpm has a single beat for each 1/4-note in 4/4-time)?
James
Hi James. I’ll try to address these metronome issues. I use an app on my phone called Metronome (I see now it is no longer available for the current OS but there are others). The app allows you to change the emphasis of the beats which is helpful (like a stronger beat on first and second beats for example) . It also has a feature where you can turn off the click and see the beat as a pulsing light. This might be helpful if the incessant click is getting to you.

Yes you can set the metronome to half to click on half notes or just one beat per measure. Typically, but not always, the tempo indicator is one beat per quarter note, shown as 130 = (picture of a quarter note).

For those of you who are thrown off by the clicking, try playing your metronome before you begin the piece and get the beat in your head or tap your foot to the correct time, then turn it off (or put it on flash only) as you begin to play. You can then take a peek at the flash to stay in tempo.

As you know, The metronome not only shows the recommended tempo but also prevents the tendency to speed up or slow down in inappropriate places. This tool is important to developing and internalizing the right tempo. When the rhythms get more complex it will be very important to be comfortable with the metronome and counting beats.

Another gear suggestion is the Planet Waves NS clip on tuner. 13 bucks at StringsByMail. It is tiny, clips on your headstock, and has a simple flashing metronome in addition to a basic tuner. And cheap. You can read reviews on the forum.

By the way if you have not discovered StringsByMail check them out.
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Michael McClenney
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Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 01

Post by Michael McClenney » Tue Sep 11, 2018 4:00 pm

Wow, there is a ton of activity already for this first lesson, I feel like I'm late to the party. I probably won't be ready to post my progress videos until this weekend, but you guys have already set the bar pretty high. This is great motivation.

Robert Drechsler
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Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 01

Post by Robert Drechsler » Tue Sep 11, 2018 4:13 pm

Michael i think its no problem if it takes some more days for you. Looking forward to listen to your Submission.

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