D05 Classical guitar lesson 01

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The classical guitar lessons are free. They are aimed at the isolated amateur who does not have access to a teacher. To join the class, apply for registration into the students group.

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Jean-François Delcamp
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D05 Classical guitar lesson 01

Post by Jean-François Delcamp » Mon Sep 03, 2018 3:22 pm

Hello everyone,
Please start by downloading the latest version of volume D05.

We are going to begin by talking about the minimum time you need to devote to the study of the guitar, about the position for holding the guitar, and finally about some techniques, exercises and pieces.

Timetable for the fifth year student:
In order to progress, you need a little time each day for 6 days of the week. Here is the minimum necessary for players of this level:
3 days when you can devote 25 minutes to repeating each difficult passage 9 to 16 times. I'll indicate these difficult passages to you by putting a box (a rectangular border) around them.
and
3 days when you can devote 60 minutes to studying the guitar, made up of
- 20 minutes practising the difficult (boxed) passages,
- 20 minutes repeating the individual phrases several times in succession (3 to 6 times)
- and finally 20 minutes playing the piece or pieces in full.

Note that you must play for 6 days of the week. If you combine all this time into one day, that is to say, 4 hours 15 minutes in a single day, you will not make progress and furthermore you will risk injuring yourself by making demands on certain muscles for too long. Divide up your practice and play a little each day.

Spend most of your practice time on the parts you have trouble playing: difficult passages, difficult phrases. Only play pieces the whole way through once or twice a week.
So we understand one another properly, here is an example of a timetable where sessions alternate between 25 and 60 minutes:
Monday 60 minutes
Tuesday 25 minutes
Wednesday 60 minutes
Thursday 25 minutes
Friday 60 minutes
Saturday 25 minutes


The playing position for the classical guitar is the product of past experience. The classical position enables us to reduce effort to a minimum, and has arisen from a compromise between the needs for stability, comfort and the efficient use of both hands.

The principles of this position are:
sitting position, back straight, shoulders level,
the guitar rests on whichever thigh is on the neck side.
We raise the head of the guitar level with our head, with the aid of a footstool or of a support placed on the thigh.
The hand which plays the strings is placed over the sound hole, the elbow rests on the edge of the body of the guitar, level with the bridge.
The arm on the neck side is bent to bring the hand up to the height of the shoulder, the thumb is placed behind the neck, beneath the second fret and behind the third string, the fingers are over the strings.
Try to achieve relaxation, from the shoulders right down to the hands.
Finally, choose a chair of a height that allows your thigh to be horizontal, so that your guitar will be supported in a stable manner. If your thigh is angled in one direction or the other, your guitar will slip and interfere with your playing.


Let us start with a little exercise to warm up the hands:
bend the fingers several times from the first (large) joint
bend them at the middle joint
bend at the middle joint until the fingertips touch the palm, then (maintaining contact with the palm) draw the fingertips as far up as possible before stretching the fingers out again.
Slide the thumb along the length of each of the four fingers in turn
Slide each of the four fingers in turn along the thumb.




Next we will look at, or revise, pages 26 and 58 of volume D01
- page 26 of volume D01 : Jean-François DELCAMP (1956) POLYPHONIE - Apoyando
- page 58 of volume D01 : Jean-François DELCAMP (1956) BUTÉ - APOYANDO - REST STROKE - APOYANDO
These exercises will work upon the technique of simultaneous rest strokes (apoyando) with the thumb and index finger, and also with the thumb and middle finger.
The rest stroke is a way to play the string with a finger movement which plucks the string and then continues to move until it comes to rest on the adjacent string. Working on this technique will allow you to discover the best position for your plucking hand (the right hand if you are right-handed).
If you are already used to plucking the strings with free strokes, the simultaneous rest strokes with the thumb and a finger will seem difficult to you, even impossible. But be assured, with patience and perseverence, this difficulty will be resolved in 30 minutes. Don't hesitate to try different positions for the hand: higher, lower, further forward or back. I know from experience that the first tries are truly discouraging, particularly for adults. It is for this reason that I wish to reassure you in advance, take heart, you will be able to do it.







Let us now look at some exercises from volume D04.
- Page 126 Jean-François DELCAMP (1956) STRING DAMPING
These techniques are essential in polyphonic playing. Guitar playing is unique in that we must stop the resonances, in particular those of the open strings. Without these string damping techniques, polyphony is blurred by dissonance.





Now we'll work on developing greater speed in playing scales.
For that, we'll use two techniques:
- speeding up the tempo while keeping the same number of notes (D05, n° 19 to 36, page 136-142).
- increasing the number of notes played while keeping a constant tempo (D05 n° 105 and 106 page 158).
Practise this with both free stroke and rest stroke.

When working on improving your technique, I recommend that you invent your own exercises to fit your needs. The basis of a good exercise is repetition as well as variation in rhythm, dynamics, articulation and notes. We always start by simplifying the passage that we want to practise, for example by practising with only one of the hands at a time, or by playing the passage slowly at first. It is very productive to take exercises designed by other people and adapt them to your own specific needs in a particular work.

Finally, we'll look at 4 pieces.

- page 21 Anonyme - Vaghe bellezze e bionde trecce d'oro vedi che per ti moro
Bar 1, first beat: starting from the bass, accelerate the thumb stroke in order to bring out the highest note of the first chord.



- page 32 Gaspar Sanz - Preludio, o capricho arpeado por la cruz
This is an unmeasured prelude: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Unmeasured_prelude
The ties group together the notes that make up a chord.
For Gaspar Sanz and the guitarists of the baroque era, the "Cruz" (cross) symbolises the chord of E minor.
(See the Italian alphabet system here http://www.guitareclassiquedelcamp.com/ ... liano.html )
In the following video I play the first line in a measured way, then the same line unmeasured.



- page 52 François de Fossa - Campanella sobre las folias de España opus 12


- page 58 Fernando Sor - Exercice opus 35 n°8
Line 6, second boxed phrase, anticipate the placing of fingers 1 and 4 in order to make the execution of the following triplet easier.



- page 92 Anonyme - Melodía de Sor attribué à Fernando Sor
I recommend that you use rest stroke for the melody notes (upper voice, played with the ring finger).
The fingering of the right hand is based on the most classical principle: the ring finger plays string 1, the middle finger string 2, and the index finger string 3, while the thumb plays strings 4, 5 and 6. To practise this type of fingering, see the arpeggios of Mauro Giuliani, pages 153, 154 and 155 of volume D05.
In bar 5, play the appoggiatura before the beat, then slide the 4th finger to sound the top E on the first beat at exactly the same time as you play the bass note.
Take care not to cut short the dotted half notes (dotted minims) in bars 16 and 32. For this I recommend that you count to yourself 9 eighth notes (quavers) in triplets.







I ask you first to work on all these exercises and pieces for one week and then to post your recordings on the forum for:
- page 126 (D04) Delcamp, Jean-François Terminer - Fermare - Damp – Apagar
- page 158 increasing the number of notes played while keeping a constant tempo (n° 105 and 106 page 158).
- page 21 Anonyme - Vaghe bellezze e bionde trecce d'oro vedi che per ti moro
- page 92 Anonyme - Melodía de Sor attribué à Fernando Sor


Good luck!


I thank Geoff (GeoffB) who has helped in the translation of my lessons into English.


Jean-François


Exam qualifying submissions: :
page 126 TERMINER - FERMARE - DAMP - APAGAR (D04)
page 158 Speed exercises (D05)
Vaghe bellezze e bionde trecce d'oro vedi che per ti moro
Melodía de Sor attribué à Fernando Sor
:( + ♫ = :)

DaveMoutrie
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Re: D05 Classical guitar lesson 01

Post by DaveMoutrie » Thu Sep 06, 2018 8:25 am

Greetings, fellow students of the guitar.

Welcome back to everyone carrying on from D04 and a very warm welcome to any new members starting with D05

I look forward to studying with you all - we have some interesting and enjoyable pieces to study this year, along with a few challenges of course.
Alhambra 4p Cedar
Barnes and Mullins classical
Yamaha silent guitar

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Chu Bun
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Re: D05 Classical guitar lesson 01

Post by Chu Bun » Thu Sep 06, 2018 4:21 pm

Welcome back. I did not practice the whole summer, lost all callus on my fingers. This first assignment will be a very painful one for me!

Colin Bullock
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Re: D05 Classical guitar lesson 01

Post by Colin Bullock » Fri Sep 07, 2018 6:22 am

Hi Dave, Chu
Good to see you are back.
Hope others will join us

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Chu Bun
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Re: D05 Classical guitar lesson 01

Post by Chu Bun » Fri Sep 07, 2018 3:23 pm

There seem to be fewer and fewer participants in the English classes lately. Maybe we should join the D05 class in other languages?
Google translate has improved a lot during the last few years. The language differences may be an inconvenience but it is not really a problem.

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Rick Beauregard
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Re: D05 Classical guitar lesson 01

Post by Rick Beauregard » Fri Sep 07, 2018 3:28 pm

We had this issue when I did D05 two years ago. I did pop into the Spanish forum from time to time for more interaction. I did D06 last year and starting D07 now. The translation issue is a problem but it is worth the effort. We had 17 members starting D06 last year and about a dozen at the end.
All this time I thought I was making music; it was making me.
2015 Steve Ganz "Solidarity"
1980 Dauphin D30
1962 Fender pre-CBS P-Bass
National Triolian Uke ca.1930
Almost as many fly rods as guitars
_/) _/)
_/)

DaveMoutrie
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Re: D05 Classical guitar lesson 01

Post by DaveMoutrie » Fri Sep 07, 2018 8:40 pm

So far there appear to be 6 students on the French forum and 5 on the Spanish forum. But of course it is still early days.

There may of course be more people joining the English forum. Google translate is very good - except when it comes to slang and when words have 2 meanings.

I'm sure there will at least be the 4 of us on the english forum as well as who ever else joins us.
Alhambra 4p Cedar
Barnes and Mullins classical
Yamaha silent guitar

Andrei Puhach
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Re: D05 Classical guitar lesson 01

Post by Andrei Puhach » Sat Sep 08, 2018 6:51 pm

Hi guys :) Glad to see most of you back.

I have been playing and practicing guitar all this time but did not progress much in terms of technique... Mostly worked on my old repertoire and started learning a new piece by Mertz (difficult for the right hand).

Played in front of people a couple times, it was ok, I'm getting more and more confident doing this.

Worked on sight-reading skills by playing Sagreras, Delcamp D02 and D03 (not systematically though). When off the guitar I use mobile apps to learn the fretboard or simply imagine certain strings and positions and associate these with notes. Or choose a certain note, say B flat, and find it on all strings. I'm more or less fluent up to the V position, my weakest areas are D and A strings above the V fret.

Another interesting thing I found out is that a luthier can do magic to a guitar. Before I moved to the US in 2011 I owned an Almansa 401, a student guitar costing ~$400. Back then I was a beginner, could not play yet, so it is was difficult to say whether the guitar was good or not. A month ago I traveled to my homeland and tried that guitar and I was astonished: it sounded so great and was so easy to play! The action was pretty low, but there was no buzzing. As it turned out my cousin brought the guitar to a luthier who did some work on the fretboard. I played a lot to my relatives and it sounded really great and smooth. After I tried my Cordoba C9 again (which I thought was perfect in terms of playability) I found out it was much more difficult to play, even though both guitars had the same strings. So, a luthier can improve a non-concert factory made guitar A LOT!
Cordoba C9

Tom Wimsatt
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Re: D05 Classical guitar lesson 01

Post by Tom Wimsatt » Sun Sep 09, 2018 12:08 am

Andrei Puhach wrote:
Sat Sep 08, 2018 6:51 pm
The Luthier information is good to know. Having one evaluate and repair or set up my guitar never crossed my mind.
1989 Takamine C132S
Yamaha CG-100A

Andrei Puhach
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Re: D05 Classical guitar lesson 01

Post by Andrei Puhach » Mon Sep 10, 2018 12:14 am

Tom Wimsatt wrote:
Sun Sep 09, 2018 12:08 am
Andrei Puhach wrote:
Sat Sep 08, 2018 6:51 pm
The Luthier information is good to know. Having one evaluate and repair or set up my guitar never crossed my mind.
Yep, that might totally change the way you practice and your guitar enthusiasm :) It must be hard to keep it if the instrument is not setup properly.

I just ordered some basic tools on e - b a y called "Fret Crowning Luthier File Leveling Grinding Tool Kits for Guitar Repairing" :) I already have some experience setting/filing the nut and bridge, now fretboard work is going to be a level up.
The only issue is that my Cordoba C9 has a truss rod and thus it might be hard to get the neck perfectly straight.
Cordoba C9

Andrei Puhach
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Re: D05 Classical guitar lesson 01

Post by Andrei Puhach » Mon Sep 10, 2018 12:22 am

Rick Beauregard wrote:
Fri Sep 07, 2018 3:28 pm
We had this issue when I did D05 two years ago. I did pop into the Spanish forum from time to time for more interaction. I did D06 last year and starting D07 now. The translation issue is a problem but it is worth the effort. We had 17 members starting D06 last year and about a dozen at the end.
Thanks for a pro-tip, Rick. Apparently, that forum is more active, but somehow it still does not feel comfortable to leave the english-speaking classes and join them :)
Cordoba C9

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Rick Beauregard
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Re: D05 Classical guitar lesson 01

Post by Rick Beauregard » Mon Sep 10, 2018 12:39 am

Andrei Puhach wrote:
Mon Sep 10, 2018 12:22 am
Rick Beauregard wrote:
Fri Sep 07, 2018 3:28 pm
We had this issue when I did D05 two years ago. I did pop into the Spanish forum from time to time for more interaction. I did D06 last year and starting D07 now. The translation issue is a problem but it is worth the effort. We had 17 members starting D06 last year and about a dozen at the end.
Thanks for a pro-tip, Rick. Apparently, that forum is more active, but somehow it still does not feel comfortable to leave the english-speaking classes and join them :)

I agree. Stick with your mates. But check in once in a while and say hi. It will also help get you up to speed and familiar with some of your future colleagues in D06 next year in the Spanish forum.
All this time I thought I was making music; it was making me.
2015 Steve Ganz "Solidarity"
1980 Dauphin D30
1962 Fender pre-CBS P-Bass
National Triolian Uke ca.1930
Almost as many fly rods as guitars
_/) _/)
_/)

Tom Wimsatt
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Re: D05 Classical guitar lesson 01

Post by Tom Wimsatt » Mon Sep 10, 2018 1:24 am

Andrei Puhach wrote:
Mon Sep 10, 2018 12:14 am
Tom Wimsatt wrote:
Sun Sep 09, 2018 12:08 am
Andrei Puhach wrote:
Sat Sep 08, 2018 6:51 pm
The Luthier information is good to know. Having one evaluate and repair or set up my guitar never crossed my mind.
Yep, that might totally change the way you practice and your guitar enthusiasm :) It must be hard to keep it if the instrument is not setup properly.

I just ordered some basic tools on e - b a y called "Fret Crowning Luthier File Leveling Grinding Tool Kits for Guitar Repairing" :) I already have some experience setting/filing the nut and bridge, now fretboard work is going to be a level up.
The only issue is that my Cordoba C9 has a truss rod and thus it might be hard to get the neck perfectly straight.
Odd thing for me is I've never actually played anything else. So I guess I don't know what I'm missing.

I watch the "Rosa Stringworks Workshop" videos (he covers all sorts of instrument repairs) and have thought of trying some setup work myself as you are going to do. My Takamine doesn't have a truss rod. I think having one may actually be an advantage - just be careful with/and how you make the adjustments I suppose.

My guitar action is ok, I do get string buzzing with light gauge strings though. I've had to tolerate a sharp "G" string (following open string tuning) for quite a while now. Perhaps an intonation adjustment and fret leveling might be in order. I'll check back at some point and see how your project goes. Maybe I'll try this myself.
1989 Takamine C132S
Yamaha CG-100A

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John Montes
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Re: D05 Classical guitar lesson 01

Post by John Montes » Mon Sep 10, 2018 12:23 pm

Welcome all D05 students, I'll be catching up on threads today and tomorrow evening and will update the tracker list where we list student submissions that have been reviewed and qualify for exam participation requirements.
2018 Salvador Castillo Concert Classical
2001 Vicente Carrillo 1a Rio
1998 German Rubio Vazquez Estudio
2015 Cordoba Solista
La Bella & D'Addario Strings

Colin Bullock
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Re: D05 Classical guitar lesson 01

Post by Colin Bullock » Mon Sep 10, 2018 2:36 pm

Andrei Puhach wrote:
Mon Sep 10, 2018 12:14 am
The only issue is that my Cordoba C9 has a truss rod and thus it might be hard to get the neck perfectly straight.
Andrei
You don't want to do this. A well set up guitar has what is known as neck relief, in other words it bows forwards allowing for the largest excursion of the strings nr centre. A truly straight neck will buzz.
PM me if you want more info.

Welcome back by the way, good to see the team back again.

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