D04 Classical guitar lesson 02

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The classical guitar lessons are free. They are aimed at the isolated amateur who does not have access to a teacher. To join the class, apply for registration into the students group.

PDF, MP3, Vidéos, Lessons : Level D01 - Level D02 - Level D03 - Level D04 - Level D05 - Level D06 - Level D07 - Level D08 - Level D09 - Level D10 - Level D11 - Level D12.
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Jean-François Delcamp
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D04 Classical guitar lesson 02

Post by Jean-François Delcamp » Tue Oct 02, 2018 11:19 am

Hello everyone,
Please start by downloading the latest version of volume D04.
If you are new to the course, please read this message to familiarize yourself with the conditions for participating in the lessons. You should also read the first message in lesson 1, where you will find advice on how to make the most of your study time and on the methods of practising that I recommend.


Today, we're going to work on a series of exercises.
- page 111 Jean-François DELCAMP (1956) EXTENSIONS
Play this left-hand exercise trying to leave your fingers in place on the strings as long as you can, as I show you in the following video. If the stretches between your fingers feel too much for you, you can make it easier for the left hand by using a capo so that you play on the higher frets which are closer together and your fingers will not have to stretch so far apart. Avoid bending your left wrist, as this not only hurts, but also hinders the mobility of your fingers. Aim for the position (of the guitar neck, your elbow and your shoulder) which will allow you to play without bending your left wrist, as shown in the following video. You will be able to play this exercise more effectively if you place your left thumb below your ring finger, i.e. below the third fret.



Improvisation work - D04
- pages 127-128
These exercises in improvisation are to be done several times a week, for several months.
Vary the volume (mf, pp, ff, p ...), timbres and rhythms. Never play the same thing twice, because it would cease to be improvisation, and would become composition.
1/ improvise on a single note (A) for 20 seconds.



2/ improvise using only two notes (G - A) for 20 seconds.



3/ improvise using only three notes (G - A - B) for 20 seconds



4/ improvise using only four notes (D - G - A - B) for 20 seconds.



5/ improvise using only 5 notes (D - E - G - A - B) for 20 seconds.


6/ improvise using only 6 notes (D - E - G - A - B - C) for 20 seconds.


7/ improvise using only 7 notes ((D - E - F - G - A - B - C) for 20 seconds.



Finally, we'll look at 4 pieces, pages 24, 30, 64, 68, 69 and 92.
- page 24 Anonyme - The sick tune
This piece is made up of phrases of 4 bars. The second and fourth phrases are divisions on the first and third phrases [i.e. embellished repetitions of those phrases using notes of shorter duration]. The third string is tuned down a semitone, so that the guitar tuning corresponds to that of the Renaissance lute for which this piece was composed.


- page 30 Losy, Jan Antonín - Capriccio, en la mineur
There are three beats to the bar, and the classical harmonic rhythm is that of one harmony per bar. At the end of each of the two sections of the Capriccio, the harmonic rhythm changes to the length of a half note (minim) and thus we get 3 harmonies (3 chords) in 2 bars, this change being known as a hemiola. A hemiola consists of the insertion of a triple rhythm into a duple rhythm, or conversely of a duple rhythm into a triple rhythm. The hemiola is used at the conclusion of the two sections of the dances of the Renaissance and Baroque period. In my PDFs I indicate the presence of hemiolas by dotted lines above the bars.


- page 64 Giuliani, Mauro - Valse opus 58 n°3
In this waltz, each phrase begins with an upbeat (or anacrusis) on the third beat. The ascending octaves and the use of dotted notes in the rhythm (dotted eighth note/quaver followed by sixteenth note/semiquaver) give this waltz a very lively feel.


- page 68, 69 Carcassi, Matteo - Valse opus 11 n°9
This waltz is made up of contrasting elements. The first section is played pianissimo, and the melody is in the bass. The second section begins forte. In the third section the melody is in the upper part, and is played with rest stroke (apoyando), the accompaniment being played with free stroke (tirando). On the second page, the crossed lines are an indication not to slide the fingers along the fourth string, so as not to cause unwanted noise.


- page 92 Tárrega, Francisco - Andantino, en la mayor
Bar 15 is particularly difficult. In order to play this succession of thirds successfully, leave your fingers on the strings and slide them from one position to another, as I show you in this video, where I play bar 15 slowly and then faster.






When you start working on a new piece, start by working very slowly, concentrating on precision. The essential thing is that you should play the music perfectly, that your rhythm should be precise, your sound well controlled, and your playing musical and expressive.
Speed will come with your new skills acquired in time through work. You should not worry about speed when tackling a new piece. At the beginning, such a preoccupation would only hinder you in your progress. It is only once you have mastered the piece within the comfort of a slow tempo, that you can start to think about playing progressively faster until finally you reach the right tempo.

The work I'm asking of you is difficult and requires you to be both organized and disciplined. It is certain that you will struggle to get your fingers to perform the exact movements required for the exercises. In order to succeed in this, you need to make the same movements several dozen times daily. The goal of these exercises is to strengthen and stretch your finger muscles, to make your fingers stronger and more agile. Put in plenty of work, every day, on the difficult parts, focus on them and play the easy parts only occasionally.
To get the best out of your practice time, split it up into 15 minute sessions, and leave your hands to rest for at least 30 minutes between sessions. If your hands hurt, leave them to rest for an hour, the time it takes your body to eliminate the lactic acid in your muscles, which is the main cause of muscle pain.


I ask you first to work on all these exercises and pieces for one week and then to post your recordings on the forum for:
- page 127 Delcamp, Jean-François Improvisation - 4/ Improvise using only 4 notes (D G A B) for 20 seconds.
- page 24 Anonyme - The sick tune
- page 64 Giuliani, Mauro - Valse opus 58 n°3
- page 92 Tárrega, Francisco - Andantino, en la mayor

Good luck!

I thank Geoff (GeoffB) who has helped in the translation of my lessons into English.

Jean-François

---

Exam qualifying submissions:

Improvise using only 4 notes (D G A B) for 20 seconds
The sick tune
Valse opus 58 n°3
Andantino, en la mayor

David Florea
Improvise using only 4 notes (D G A B) for 20 seconds
The sick tune
Valse opus 58 n°3
Andantino, en la mayor

Robert Goodwin
The sick tune
Valse opus 58 n°3
Andantino, en la mayor

JohnEllis
Improvise using only 4 notes (D G A B) for 20 seconds
The sick tune
Valse opus 58 n°3
Andantino, en la mayor
:( + ♫ = :)

David Florea
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Re: D04 Classical guitar lesson 02

Post by David Florea » Mon Oct 08, 2018 9:41 pm

Sick Tune

David Florea
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Re: D04 Classical guitar lesson 02

Post by David Florea » Mon Oct 08, 2018 10:19 pm


Robert Goodwin
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Re: D04 Classical guitar lesson 02

Post by Robert Goodwin » Tue Oct 09, 2018 7:31 pm

Hi David,
Valiant effort for such short preparation time. I've been practicing this one every day since the new lesson came out and I'm just not ready to record it.

Interesting note, my wife asked what I was playing and when I told her about the SickTtune, she pointed out that it was written around the time of the great plague which is estimated to have killed as much as 1/3 of the European population. That's when I realized this is actually a dirge. Knowing that has colored the way I see this music. I can picture it being played to set the pace for a funeral procession. Very sad music.

Hope to record soon. Best regards,
Bob G.

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Re: D04 Classical guitar lesson 02

Post by JohnEllis » Tue Oct 09, 2018 8:05 pm

Hi David,
Glad you could post these and get lesson 2 rolling.
1) Sick tune: Good work with finding the suggested fingering. As you continue to practice it, it will become more fluid. One advice would be not to speed up on the easier parts until you can play the others in the same tempo.
2) Improvisation: I liked the rhythmic variation in your playing.
Like Bob, I hope to post mine soon. I've been working on the lesson for the last week and a half and hope to have them ready by this weekend.
John
If music be the food of love, play on. --Shakespeare, Twelfth Night, 1.1

David Florea
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Re: D04 Classical guitar lesson 02

Post by David Florea » Wed Oct 10, 2018 6:32 pm

Yes I know how you feel. My philosophy is I better record it or it will never get recorded. Onward and Upward!

David Florea
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Re: D04 Classical guitar lesson 02

Post by David Florea » Thu Oct 11, 2018 2:06 pm

Valse
Last edited by David Florea on Thu Oct 18, 2018 12:56 pm, edited 1 time in total.

David Florea
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Re: D04 Classical guitar lesson 02 Adantino

Post by David Florea » Thu Oct 11, 2018 2:39 pm


David Florea
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Re: D04 Classical guitar lesson 02

Post by David Florea » Thu Oct 11, 2018 2:44 pm

[quote="David Florea" post_id=1310852
Last edited by David Florea on Thu Oct 18, 2018 1:00 pm, edited 1 time in total.

David Florea
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Re: D04 Classical guitar lesson 02

Post by David Florea » Thu Oct 11, 2018 2:50 pm

David Florea wrote:
Thu Oct 11, 2018 2:44 pm
David Florea wrote:
Thu Oct 11, 2018 2:06 pm
Last edited by David Florea on Thu Oct 18, 2018 1:01 pm, edited 1 time in total.

David Florea
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Re: D04 Classical guitar lesson 02

Post by David Florea » Thu Oct 11, 2018 3:00 pm

If anyone can let me know how to delete posts I can clean this up.

Robert Goodwin
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Re: D04 Classical guitar lesson 02

Post by Robert Goodwin » Sun Oct 14, 2018 6:06 pm

Hi all,
After two weeks of practice I was unable to totally memorize this but had to spot check the score slowing everything down and causing me to fumble here and there. For the sake of progress, I'm going to post what I have and move on. I still need a lot of work on that valse.

Comments and suggestions are welcome.
Best regards,
Bob G.

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Charles Cook
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Re: D04 Classical guitar lesson 02

Post by Charles Cook » Wed Oct 17, 2018 10:30 pm

David Florea wrote:
Thu Oct 11, 2018 3:00 pm
If anyone can let me know how to delete posts I can clean this up.
Hi David. Found this on the FAQ page:

How do I edit or delete a post?
Unless you are a board administrator or moderator, you can only edit or delete your own posts. You can edit a post by clicking the edit button for the relevant post, sometimes for only a limited time after the post was made. If someone has already replied to the post, you will find a small piece of text output below the post when you return to the topic which lists the number of times you edited it along with the date and time. This will only appear if someone has made a reply; it will not appear if a moderator or administrator edited the post, though they may leave a note as to why they’ve edited the post at their own discretion. Please note that normal users cannot delete a post once someone has replied.

Charles
2017 Cordoba 20th Anniversary Guitar
1993 Jose Ramirez R2

David Florea
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Re: D04 Classical guitar lesson 02

Post by David Florea » Thu Oct 18, 2018 1:06 pm

Charles, thanks. One issue ,I think ,I ran into was in submitting the edited post all of the characters were deleted and Would not let me delete the post.as you can see my videos are absent but a few characters remain. Better but not what I intended.

Colin Bullock
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Re: D04 Classical guitar lesson 02

Post by Colin Bullock » Thu Oct 18, 2018 1:40 pm

David Florea wrote:
Thu Oct 11, 2018 3:00 pm
If anyone can let me know how to delete posts I can clean this up.
David
You can request a post be deleted by putting a message here with a link viewforum.php?f=22

If there is more than one you can link to the first

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