D01 Classical guitar lesson 03

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The classical guitar lessons are free. They are aimed at the isolated amateur who does not have access to a teacher. To join the class, apply for registration into the students group.

PDF, MP3, Vidéos, Lessons : Level D01 - Level D02 - Level D03 - Level D04 - Level D05 - Level D06 - Level D07 - Level D08 - Level D09 - Level D10 - Level D11 - Level D12.
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Jean-François Delcamp
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D01 Classical guitar lesson 03

Post by Jean-François Delcamp » Tue Nov 06, 2018 8:57 am

Hello everyone,
Please start by downloading the latest version of volume D01.
If you are new to the course, please read this message to familiarize yourself with the conditions for participating in the lessons. You should also read the first message in lesson 1, where you will find advice on how to make the most of your study time and on the methods of practising that I recommend.



First we will study some technical exercises from volume D01.
Page 54: G major scale and C major scale, numbers 2 and 3. Be sure to damp the notes properly in the descending passages. To damp the notes in the descending passages: lean the fingers of the left hand against the vibrating strings. Work on controlling the volume by playing crescendo and decrescendo.







Finally, we'll look at nine simple tunes, pages 16 to 20
Anonyme : Scarborough fair

Anonyme : Ah vous dirai-je maman

Anonyme : La bonne aventure

Jean-François Delcamp : SI SI RE

Anonyme : Sur le pont d'Avignon

Johann Kaspar Mertz : Übungen im Wechsel – Anschlag. auf zwei Saiten

Patty & Mildred j. Hill : Good-morning to all

Dionisio Aguado : Leccion 5a

Anonyme : Lo, nous marchons sur un étroit chemin






In order to mark the beat yourself, you need to count the smallest rhythmic values out loud as you play, as indicated on the score: "1 e 2 e 3 e" ("1 and 2 and 3 and" in English)
Using a metronome is useful, but it is only a temporary crutch to lean on. You will benefit far more by counting the beats out loud as you play than by using a metronome. Internalizing the rhythm allows us in time to achieve both freedom and discipline when playing, that is, to be a musician.
If counting the smallest values out loud seems difficult, or very difficult, to you, it only means that you have to persevere, or persevere a lot more. Keep at it with determination until it becomes easy and natural for you. When, after having practised it long enough, this exercise of counting out loud while you play becomes easy, then you don't need to bother with it any more.
When you start working on a new piece, start by working very slowly, concentrating on precision. The essential thing is that you should play the music perfectly, that your rhythm should be precise, your sound well controlled, and your playing musical and expressive.
Speed will come with your new skills acquired in time through work. You should not worry about speed when tackling a new piece. At the beginning, such a preoccupation would only hinder you in your progress. It is only once you have mastered the piece within the comfort of a slow tempo, that you can start to think about playing progressively faster until finally you reach the right tempo.



You can memorize different tempi (tempos) by mentally associating each one with a tune you have learnt by heart. Learn a suitable tune for each tempo. Begin with Good-morning to all (the same tune as Happy Birthday) for the tempo of 120 (beats per minute).


I ask you first to work on all these exercises and tunes for a week and then to upload your recordings of:
Jean-François Delcamp : SI SI RE
Anonyme : Good-morning to all
Dionisio Aguado : Leccion 5a
Anonyme : Lo, nous marchons sur un étroit chemin




Good luck!


I thank Geoff (GeoffB) who has helped in the translation of my lessons into English.


Jean-François

---

Exam qualifying submissions:

SI SI RE
Good-morning to all
Leccion 5a
Lo, nous marchons sur un étroit chemin
:( + ♫ = :)

Judy Verbeeten
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Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 03

Post by Judy Verbeeten » Tue Nov 06, 2018 8:57 pm

Please find my submissions for lesson 3 below.








William Byrd
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Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 03

Post by William Byrd » Thu Nov 08, 2018 12:36 pm

Hello Judy,

Good effort overall, however, your right hand fingering on Leccion 5a seems to be off. Just an observation.

Well done.
1959 Sakazo Nakade
1962 Mitsuru Tamura
1973 Ryoji Matsuoka No 40
2010 Hiroshi Komori No 35

Jeffrey Wijnans
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Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 03

Post by Jeffrey Wijnans » Thu Nov 08, 2018 10:09 pm

Hi there Judy! Quick as always ;)

Good job on the 3th lesson! As for the tips I would say watch your tumb position of the left hand. Right now its over the neck instead of on the neck behind the middle finger (Dont know if these are the right terms but hey were all here to learn haha). Second tip, which is something I hear in my own playing as well. Your last video is played very staccato, if you listen to the video from Jean-François its feels more fluent/holding on to the tone a little better.

Keep up the good work! :bravo:

Judy Verbeeten
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Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 03

Post by Judy Verbeeten » Thu Nov 08, 2018 11:51 pm

Jeffrey Wijnans wrote:
Thu Nov 08, 2018 10:09 pm
Hi there Judy! Quick as always ;)

Good job on the 3th lesson! As for the tips I would say watch your tumb position of the left hand. Right now its over the neck instead of on the neck behind the middle finger (Dont know if these are the right terms but hey were all here to learn haha). Second tip, which is something I hear in my own playing as well. Your last video is played very staccato, if you listen to the video from Jean-François its feels more fluent/holding on to the tone a little better.

Keep up the good work! :bravo:
Thank you for the constructive comments Jeff. Notably, on the last piece, Jean-Francois uses different fingering than is notated on the piece. Specifically, the piece notation is for the thumb to play most of the notes (I presume to give a more staccato, march-like feel) whereas Jean-Francois uses i and m for most of the notes, providing a definitely more legato, less march-like tempo.

Graham Gaya
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Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 03

Post by Graham Gaya » Sat Nov 10, 2018 3:46 am

Judy Verbeeten wrote:
Tue Nov 06, 2018 8:57 pm
Please find my submissions for lesson 3 below.
Way to go Judy with the first submissions. You have done a nice job hitting the notes. As has been called out, with the transition tempo you will get the musical flow. From the angle of the video (lo nous marchons), it is hard to tell if you are hiting the mutings called out as that seems to be an emphasis for this lesson.

Perhaps the moderators can clarify this. On Leccion 5a, first measure second note indicates fret 4. Judy like you did, I think it sounds better played on fret 3. This seems like a typo. Similar thing to measure 7, 9, 13, and 15. Perhaps it could be that I don't have the latest sheets.

Overall, great work and thanks for keeping us on pace. Hope to catch up to you.

William Byrd
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Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 03

Post by William Byrd » Sat Nov 10, 2018 4:10 am

Graham Gaya wrote:
Sat Nov 10, 2018 3:46 am
Judy Verbeeten wrote:
Tue Nov 06, 2018 8:57 pm
Please find my submissions for lesson 3 below.
Way to go Judy with the first submissions. You have done a nice job hitting the notes. As has been called out, with the transition tempo you will get the musical flow. From the angle of the video (lo nous marchons), it is hard to tell if you are hiting the mutings called out as that seems to be an emphasis for this lesson.

Perhaps the moderators can clarify this. On Leccion 5a, first measure second note indicates fret 4. Judy like you did, I think it sounds better played on fret 3. This seems like a typo. Similar thing to measure 7, 9, 13, and 15. Perhaps it could be that I don't have the latest sheets.

Overall, great work and thanks for keeping us on pace. Hope to catch up to you.
Hi Graham,

The number 4 does not indicate to play on the fourth fret. The note is supposed to be played with the fourth finger. I hope this helps. The only reason I'm holding off posting is because of Leccion 5a. I am still working on getting the right hand fingerings correct. The crossovers, which I think is the emphasis of this piece, are quite difficult. It's a very frustrating piece.
1959 Sakazo Nakade
1962 Mitsuru Tamura
1973 Ryoji Matsuoka No 40
2010 Hiroshi Komori No 35

Graham Gaya
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Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 03

Post by Graham Gaya » Sat Nov 10, 2018 6:05 pm

William Byrd wrote:
Sat Nov 10, 2018 4:10 am
Hi Graham,

The number 4 does not indicate to play on the fourth fret. The note is supposed to be played with the fourth finger. I hope this helps. The only reason I'm holding off posting is because of Leccion 5a. I am still working on getting the right hand fingerings correct. The crossovers, which I think is the emphasis of this piece, are quite difficult. It's a very frustrating piece.
Thank you for that clarification William, I had have been reading it wrong. I am new to music reading so this helps a lot. What's the why for using the 4th finger where most of the time the note is played with the 3rd finger?

William Byrd
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Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 03

Post by William Byrd » Sun Nov 11, 2018 12:26 am

Graham Gaya wrote:
Sat Nov 10, 2018 6:05 pm
William Byrd wrote:
Sat Nov 10, 2018 4:10 am
Hi Graham,

The number 4 does not indicate to play on the fourth fret. The note is supposed to be played with the fourth finger. I hope this helps. The only reason I'm holding off posting is because of Leccion 5a. I am still working on getting the right hand fingerings correct. The crossovers, which I think is the emphasis of this piece, are quite difficult. It's a very frustrating piece.
Thank you for that clarification William, I had have been reading it wrong. I am new to music reading so this helps a lot. What's the why for using the 4th finger where most of the time the note is played with the 3rd finger?
I'm not 100 percent sure, but I am sure it's there for a reason. Perhaps someone more knowledgeable will weigh in.
1959 Sakazo Nakade
1962 Mitsuru Tamura
1973 Ryoji Matsuoka No 40
2010 Hiroshi Komori No 35

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Rick Beauregard
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Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 03

Post by Rick Beauregard » Sun Nov 11, 2018 8:03 pm

William Byrd wrote:
Sun Nov 11, 2018 12:26 am
Graham Gaya wrote:
Sat Nov 10, 2018 6:05 pm
William Byrd wrote:
Sat Nov 10, 2018 4:10 am
Hi Graham,

The number 4 does not indicate to play on the fourth fret. The note is supposed to be played with the fourth finger. I hope this helps. The only reason I'm holding off posting is because of Leccion 5a. I am still working on getting the right hand fingerings correct. The crossovers, which I think is the emphasis of this piece, are quite difficult. It's a very frustrating piece.
Thank you for that clarification William, I had have been reading it wrong. I am new to music reading so this helps a lot. What's the why for using the 4th finger where most of the time the note is played with the 3rd finger?
I'm not 100 percent sure, but I am sure it's there for a reason. Perhaps someone more knowledgeable will weigh in.
I'm not sure I see a compelling reason to use 3 over 4 in this circumstance. And there does seem to be some inconsistency further on. There can often be multiple options. They key is to pick one option and always do it that way. If you make a change write it on your score. So you could use 3, or 4, or 4 the first time it occurs then 3. Just do it the same way throughout your practice or you will introduce confusion and doubt. I think in these early lessons, "it's there for a reason" is a good rule to follow. Later you may take issue with the presented options and want to try your own. I often do when first working out a piece. But nearly as often change it back to the way it was once I try to play the piece at tempo.
All this time I thought I was making music; it was making me.
2015 Steve Ganz "Solidarity"
1980 Dauphin D30
1962 Fender pre-CBS P-Bass
National Triolian Uke ca.1930
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Charles Cook
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Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 03

Post by Charles Cook » Mon Nov 12, 2018 1:20 am

Perhaps the moderators can clarify this. On Leccion 5a, first measure second note indicates fret 4. Judy like you did, I think it sounds better played on fret 3.

Graham and Judy- it is a g on the 3rd fret with the fourth finger.

Charles
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Staffan Strömberg
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Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 03

Post by Staffan Strömberg » Mon Nov 12, 2018 8:31 pm

Well done Judy. Very musical and with consistent tempo.

/Staffan

Robert Goodwin
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Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 03

Post by Robert Goodwin » Mon Nov 12, 2018 10:41 pm

Graham Gaya wrote:
Sat Nov 10, 2018 6:05 pm
William Byrd wrote:
Sat Nov 10, 2018 4:10 am
Hi Graham,

The number 4 does not indicate to play on the fourth fret. The note is supposed to be played with the fourth finger. I hope this helps. The only reason I'm holding off posting is because of Leccion 5a. I am still working on getting the right hand fingerings correct. The crossovers, which I think is the emphasis of this piece, are quite difficult. It's a very frustrating piece.
Thank you for that clarification William, I had have been reading it wrong. I am new to music reading so this helps a lot. What's the why for using the 4th finger where most of the time the note is played with the 3rd finger?
I have not looked at this particular piece but I can say that in general, specific fingering indications are there to facilitate making the next position. For example, freeing the 3rd finger to make the next note following the note by the 4th finger. I have learned over time that following those markings are the best way to do it. Another, more obvious reason for alternate fingering, is when the spacing makes it necessary to span across several frets. You will encounter this more and more as you progress. I would recommend to make it a habit now to follow those markings as you begin studying each piece just as you follow the notes and rests.

Hope this helps.
Best regards,
Bob G.

Michael McClenney
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Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 03

Post by Michael McClenney » Tue Nov 13, 2018 5:23 pm

Judy Verbeeten wrote:
Tue Nov 06, 2018 8:57 pm
Please find my submissions for lesson 3 below.
Thanks for taking the lead this month, Judy! You've got some good feedback, the one thing I would point out is that in "Lo, Nous Marches ..." you are doing free stroke with your thumb instead of rest stroke, as your thumb is not resting on the next string.

Your tone is very good though, and you mentioned in an earlier comment that Mr. Delcamp is using p/i/m where we're instructed to use p most of the time. I was a little confused by that at first, but I believe the point is to teach us to keep the volume of our thumb stroke in line with the rest of our fingers, and you do that well.

Michael McClenney
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Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 03

Post by Michael McClenney » Tue Nov 13, 2018 5:25 pm

Man ... I am having a lot of trouble with Leccion 5a. I'm up for the challenge but I cannot play this piece without sounding very sloppy. Hopefully I'll get my videos done before Thanksgiving, but I don't want to post before I get a handle on this piece.

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