D04 Classical guitar lesson 04

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The classical guitar lessons are free. They are aimed at the isolated amateur who does not have access to a teacher. To join the class, apply for registration into the students group.

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Jean-François Delcamp
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D04 Classical guitar lesson 04

Post by Jean-François Delcamp » Mon Dec 03, 2018 4:35 pm

Hello everyone,
Please start by downloading the latest version of volume D04.
If you are new to the course, please read this message to familiarize yourself with the conditions for participating in the lessons. You should also read the first message in lesson 1, where you will find advice on how to make the most of your study time and on the methods of practising that I recommend.


Today, we're going to work on a series of exercises.
- page 113, numbers 14, 15, 16 - Jean-François DELCAMP (1956) GAMMES - SCALE - SCALES – ESCALAS
When changes of position are needed, you will be using the "position shift" technique. Position I is the left hand position where the index finger (1) is placed behind the 1st fret, position V is the hand position where the index (1) is placed behind the fifth fret, etc. The position shift involves moving the left hand along the neck, from position to position, from fret to fret. In the scales we're looking at today, notice that my first finger never leaves the first string, I use it as a guide for my hand. Position shifts are shown by oblique lines linking two fingering indications given for the same finger.
The following videos are for numbers 14, 15, 16 on page 113. Concentrate your practice on the passages highlighted in yellow, and do your best to perfect the position shift technique.







Finally, we'll look at 4 pieces, pages 26, 62, 63, 76, 77 et 98.

- page 26 Anonyme Scarborough Fair
The phrase structure is of 4 bars. (Phrase structure is the division of the larger musical phrase into parts of equal length, with the most common division being into sections of 4 bars. This division is linked not only to walking, but also to dance, poetry and singing.) Here we have an English tune dating from the end of the Middle Ages. The accompaniment in eighth notes (quavers) gives a fluidity to the whole. It's enough to accentuate the notes of the melody slightly for "Scarborough Fair" to evoke a feeling of space and peace. I think this piece has strong therapeutic powers both for us playing it and for those listening.



- page 62, 63 Giuliani, Mauro Etude opus 51 n°12
In this arpeggio study, the melody is in the bass. The index and middle finger play the accompaniment on strings 1 and 2, while the thumb plays the melody on strings 3, 4, 5 and 6.
The point of this study is to seek to keep the index and middle finger strokes of equal strength throughout, whether the distance between them and the thumb is small (when the thumb is playing string 3) or large (when the thumb is playing string 6).
From bar 20 onwards, the instruction sf (sforzando, sforzato, sf, sfz ) means that you should give a sudden, strong emphasis to the note immediately above the instruction.
In bar 22, I use a hinged barré (indicated by a dotted line instead of a solid line) to play the D and A on the open strings, and I don't apply the full barré until the third beat of the bar, to play the bass Bb.
Mauro Giuliani is the first teacher to have published a systematic study of arpeggios ( http://www.guitareclassiquedelcamp.com/ ... liani.html : Opus. 1 - Studio per la chitarra, Prima parte : 120 arpeggi). I recommend that you practise a few arpeggios each day and change them regularly with the aim of studying all of them in two years. You can listen to the mp3s of the 120 arpeggios recorded by Marco Cairone here: http://www.chitarraclassicadelcamp.com/ ... 32&t=25253 .



- page 76, 77 Paganini, Niccolò Ghiribizzo n°24
Ghiribizzo n°24 is in two sections, each of 20 bars. It has a phrase structure of 4 bars. In the second section, Paganini repeats the melody of the first section an octave higher. The piece is in the key of A, and this key allows the optimal use of the 3 bass strings of the guitar: E (dominant), A (tonic), D (subdominant). Observe the exact duration of the bass notes, and damp them by placing your thumb on the string as and where indicated by the damping symbols and finger indications on the first line.



- page 98 Delcamp, Jean-François Novelette n°3, à Alexandra
This piece is divided into two sections, like Paganini's Ghiribizzo n°24. In the first section, the melody in the bass is played by the thumb. In bars 10 and 12, to conclude the first section, I use the whole tone scale (F G A B C# D# F). In bar 16, the melody passes to the treble notes, while the thumb repeats the tonic (E) until the end. The harmonics in bar 23 are played by very lightly touching strings 1 and 3 exactly over fret XII.




I ask you first to work on all these exercises and pieces for one week and then to post your recordings on the forum for:
- page 113 number 14, Jean-François DELCAMP (1956) GAMMES - SCALE - SCALES - ESCALAS
- page 26 Anonyme Scarborough Fair
- page 76, 77 Paganini, Niccolò Ghiribizzo n°24
- page 98 Delcamp, Jean-François Novelette n°3, à Alexandra


Good luck!

I thank Geoff (GeoffB) who has helped in the translation of my lessons into English.

Jean-François

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Exam qualifying submissions:

GAMMES - SCALE - SCALES - ESCALAS
Scarborough Fair
Ghiribizzo n°24
Novelette n°3, à Alexandra
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