D05 Classical guitar lesson 08

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The classical guitar lessons are free. They are aimed at the isolated amateur who does not have access to a teacher. To join the class, apply for registration into the students group.

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Jean-François Delcamp
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D05 Classical guitar lesson 08

Post by Jean-François Delcamp » Wed Apr 03, 2019 9:18 am

Hello everyone,
Please start by downloading the latest version of volume D05.
If you are new to the course, please read this message to familiarize yourself with the conditions for participating in the lessons. You should also read the first message in lesson 1, where you will find advice on how to make the most of your study time and on the methods of practising that I recommend.





Now we're going to work on a study:
- pages 154, 155 Francisco Tàrrega (1852-1909) Estudio en mi mayor
In the company of Tàrrega, we're going to pay a visit to fret XIX and play a top B, in bar 29. To reach this part of the fingerboard more easily you can raise your guitar up by adjusting your guitar support or your footstool to its maximum height. The path of the thumb under the neck is as follows:
1) The thumb starts off beneath the third string, opposite the middle or ring finger.
2) Then, the more the hand is moved towards the soundhole, the closer the thumb gets to the first string.
3) Finally, as you move towards the highest notes, the thumb is placed on the edge of the fingerboard, as I show you in the following short videos.






Today we'll look at 4 pieces.

- page 47 Johann Sebastian Bach (1685-1750) Prelude BWV 1007
The first 4 bars establish the key. They present in succession D major, G major (with a D bass), A major 7th (with a D bass), and D major. That is to say, a succession of the tonic, subdominant, dominant and tonic. The tension increases from bar 1 to bar 3, reaching its maximum in bar 3, because of the presence of the dissonant interval D-C#. This increasing tension may be expressed with a crescendo. The tension disappears in bar 4, with the resolution of the dissonant interval by means of a fully consonant octave interval, D-D. We then have various modulations, into A major from bar 5 (G#), E minor in bar 11, B minor in bar 13, and G major in bar 16. From bar 23 there are many scale passages and we notice the presence, in the bass notes, of a pedal note on the A (the dominant), which eventually resolves into a perfect cadence in the very last bar of the prelude. This adaptation for guitar, like many others of this suite, is in D major, a key which offers the advantage that the tonic (D) and dominant (A) correspond to two of the bass strings of the guitar. The few bass notes that I have added are in brackets.




- page 54 Niccolò Paganini (1782-1840) Sonata n°4
This short sonata, written with admirable effectiveness, includes a rondo which is light and full of zest. Note the presence of the Alberti bass (bars 5, 6, 7, 10, 11, 20, 21, 22, 23, 48 and 50) which consists in arpeggiating the chords of the accompaniment starting with the root note, followed by the fifth, the third and then the fifth again. This Alberti bass was used particularly during the classical period (Fernando Sor, Mauro Giuliani). The rhythm of the melody is written without specifying the exact lengths of the notes. For instance, in bar 5 the melody consists of the notes played on strings 1 and 2, which, in my opinion, should sound like this: D dotted quarter note (dotted crotchet), F, E, D quarter notes (crotchets). Similarly in bars 6, 7, 10, 11, 20, 21, 22 and 23. Many composers of the classical period, for example Carulli, frequently notate music in this way, without giving the exact length of the notes of each of the voices making up the polyphony. This simplification of the writing saved space on the paper and made the engraver's work easier.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alberti_bass




- page 112 Zequinha de Abreu (1880-1935) Amando sobre o mar
This slow waltz from the Brazilian composer Zequinha de Abreu is made up of a melody with an extended range of pitch: from the middle D# (bar 57) to the top A (bar 11). The accompaniment should be played subtly and softly, so as to support the melody without ever drowning it out.




Julio Sagreras (1879-1942) Leccione III n°4
Here is an excellent and beautiful tremolo study. Sagreras invites us to begin by using the simplest fingering: pimi, then a more complex one: piai. Once we've mastered these fingerings, we'll go on to use the king of fingerings for tremolo: pami. Evenness of the sound and regularity of the repeated notes are essential in order to give the melody its continuity. Slow practice, together with a search for perfection in the detail, is necessary to obtain this regularity. Every note is important.




I ask you first to work on all these exercises and tunes for a week and then to upload your recordings of:
- page 47 Johann Sebastian Bach (1685-1750) Prelude BWV 1007
- pages 154, 155 Francisco Tàrrega (1852-1909) Estudio en mi mayor




Good luck!


I thank Geoff (GeoffB) who has helped in the translation of my lessons into English.


Jean-François


Exam qualifying submissions: :
Johann Sebastian Bach (1685-1750) Prelude BWV 1007
Francisco Tàrrega (1852-1909) Estudio en mi mayor
:( + ♫ = :)

DaveMoutrie
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Re: D05 Classical guitar lesson 08

Post by DaveMoutrie » Thu Apr 11, 2019 6:31 am

Some amazing (though challenging) pieces this month - the Bach is 3 pages long. Hope I can find the time to learn them all.

Does anyone know when the pieces for this year's exam will be announced?

Thanks.
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Colin Bullock
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Re: D05 Classical guitar lesson 08

Post by Colin Bullock » Thu Apr 11, 2019 7:07 am

DaveMoutrie wrote:
Thu Apr 11, 2019 6:31 am
Some amazing (though challenging) pieces this month - the Bach is 3 pages long. Hope I can find the time to learn them all.

Does anyone know when the pieces for this year's exam will be announced?

Thanks.
20th April.
Don’t know yet whether it will be a piece from the Delcamp publications or an external piece.
Best of luck catching up, I think you and Chu are in with a chance.

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John Montes
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Re: D05 Classical guitar lesson 08

Post by John Montes » Thu Apr 11, 2019 11:24 am

Chu is qualified to sit for the exam.
Dave if you submit the L4 pieces and either the Barrios piece from L5 or these 2 pieces from L8 you will also qualify for the exam.
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Chu Bun
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Re: D05 Classical guitar lesson 08

Post by Chu Bun » Fri Apr 12, 2019 4:43 am

The Bach's piece is long indeed. On the bright side, no complicate chords or barres. The melody is pretty well known which helps with memorizing/sight reading.

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Chu Bun
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Re: D05 Classical guitar lesson 08

Post by Chu Bun » Fri Apr 12, 2019 4:44 am

John Montes wrote:
Thu Apr 11, 2019 11:24 am
Chu is qualified to sit for the exam.
Dave if you submit the L4 pieces and either the Barrios piece from L5 or these 2 pieces from L8 you will also qualify for the exam.
John,
Thank you for letting me know.

Dave,
I need some company for the exam!

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Re: D05 Classical guitar lesson 08

Post by Colin Bullock » Fri Apr 12, 2019 6:55 am

Chu Bun wrote:
Fri Apr 12, 2019 4:44 am
Dave,
I need some company for the exam!
You’ll be fine, in with a good chance of a good grade.

DaveMoutrie
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Re: D05 Classical guitar lesson 08

Post by DaveMoutrie » Fri Apr 12, 2019 7:55 am

Colin, John - thank you for your help - I'd forgotten about lesson 4. Better get something published quick (even if its a bit unpretty).

Currently struggling with the harmonics in the Barrios piece.
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DaveMoutrie
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Re: D05 Classical guitar lesson 08

Post by DaveMoutrie » Fri Apr 12, 2019 7:58 am

Colin Bullock wrote:
Fri Apr 12, 2019 6:55 am
Chu Bun wrote:
Fri Apr 12, 2019 4:44 am
Dave,
I need some company for the exam!
You’ll be fine, in with a good chance of a good grade.
Totally agree with you Colin - you're looking good Chu. I'll do my best to join you for the exam.
Alhambra 4p Cedar
Barnes and Mullins classical
Yamaha silent guitar

DaveMoutrie
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Re: D05 Classical guitar lesson 08

Post by DaveMoutrie » Mon Apr 15, 2019 6:22 am

Just been having a quick look at the Bach. Does anyone else find it's easier to use a barree on the second fret in bar 8 rather than the fingering given?
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Chu Bun
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Re: D05 Classical guitar lesson 08

Post by Chu Bun » Wed Apr 17, 2019 8:24 pm

Dave,
Using a barre is much easier. Thanks for the tip. That's piece is more difficult than I thought. There are many dissonant parts. Sometimes, I am not quite sure if I read/play the notes incorrectly, or if that how they are supposed to be.

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Re: D05 Classical guitar lesson 08

Post by DaveMoutrie » Wed Apr 24, 2019 6:59 am

I'm glad you find the barre easier Chu, but using it does require a fast position shift in order for the piece to sound legato.

I think this month's work is mainly about fast and accurate position shifts as the Tarrega study requires rapid shifts from one end of the fretboard to the other.

I really need to complete both this months pieces to qualify for the exam as I'm still really struggling with the harmonics in barrios piece from month 5.

Good luck with this month's pieces, they certainly are a challenge!
Alhambra 4p Cedar
Barnes and Mullins classical
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DaveMoutrie
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Re: D05 Classical guitar lesson 08

Post by DaveMoutrie » Wed May 01, 2019 6:57 am

Hope everyone is getting on OK(does that mean just me and you Chu?). I'm finding the Bach quite an interesting exercise - Starts off quite easy, there are scales and arpeggios, discords that don't sound right when taken in isolation, but then resolve themselves. then of course the position shifts,and slightly unusual LH fingerings that take many repetitions to get right. In places I am still struggling to keep the alternation going and avoid repeated fingerings with the right hand.

The Tarrega seems relatively easy apart from having to jump about from one end of the fret board to the other - and of course having to play right at the top end of the fret board.

All that being said, I am hoping to post something really soon.

Keep on practicing!
Alhambra 4p Cedar
Barnes and Mullins classical
Yamaha silent guitar

Colin Bullock
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Re: D05 Classical guitar lesson 08

Post by Colin Bullock » Wed May 01, 2019 9:57 am

DaveMoutrie wrote:
Wed May 01, 2019 6:57 am
Hope everyone is getting on OK(does that mean just me and you Chu?).
I'm afraid it is just you and Chu. Andrei may be back next yr but can't join at moment; I'm starting what my hand therapist calls shadow practice, placing the fingers and thumb but not applying thumb pressure, I'm now up to 10 mins a day and hoping to join you in Sept.

Best of luck to you both.
Colin

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Chu Bun
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Re: D05 Classical guitar lesson 08

Post by Chu Bun » Wed May 01, 2019 10:11 pm

Colin,
Hope your hand gets better soon.
Not sure what causes it, but I have tennis elbow on my left arm which gets painful when I practice for more than 30mins. Is it possible that playing guitar can cause tennis elbow? I do play racket sports and have had tennis elbow a few times in the past but never on the left arm.

Dave,
Many parts of the Bach's piece sounds very strange to my ears. I could not make sense of the chord progression or other clues and as a result have a hard time sight read this piece. I've not touch the Tarrega's piece yet. Hopefully it would be easier as you said.

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