D03 Classical guitar lesson 01

The classical guitar lessons are free. They are aimed at the isolated amateur who does not have access to a teacher. To join the class, apply for registration into the students group.
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The classical guitar lessons are free. They are aimed at the isolated amateur who does not have access to a teacher. To join the class, apply for registration into the students group.

PDF, MP3, Vidéos, Lessons : Level D01 - Level D02 - Level D03 - Level D04 - Level D05 - Level D06 - Level D07 - Level D08 - Level D09 - Level D10 - Level D11 - Level D12.
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Jean-François Delcamp
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D03 Classical guitar lesson 01

Post by Jean-François Delcamp » Sat Aug 31, 2019 6:58 pm

Hello everyone,
Please start by downloading the latest version of volume D03.

We are going to talk about the minimum time you need to devote to the study of the guitar, about the position for holding the guitar, and finally about some techniques, exercises and pieces.



The schedule of a student in the third year:
In order to progress, you need a little time each day for 6 days of the week. Here is the minimum necessary for players of this level :
3 days when you can devote 15 minutes to repeating each difficult passage 6 to 12 times. I'll indicate these difficult passages to you by putting a box (a rectangular border) around them.
and
3 days when you can devote 40 minutes to studying the guitar, made up of
- 15 minutes practicing the difficult (boxed) passages,
- 15 minutes repeating the individual phrases several times in succession (3 to 6 times)
- and finally 10 minutes playing the piece or pieces in full.

Note that you must play for 6 days of the week. If you combine all this time into one day, that is to say, 2 hours 45 minutes in a single day, you will not make progress and furthermore you will risk injuring yourself by making demands on certain muscles for too long. Divide up your practice and play a little each day.

Spend most of your practice time on the parts you have trouble playing: difficult passages, difficult phrases. Only play pieces the whole way through once or twice a week.
So we understand one another properly, here is an example of a timetable where sessions alternate between 15 and 40 minutes:
Monday 40 minutes
Tuesday 15 minutes
Wednesday 40 minutes
Thursday 15 minutes
Friday 40 minutes
Saturday 15 minutes



The position for the classical guitar is the product of past experience. The classical position enables us to reduce effort to a minimum, and has arisen from a compromise between the needs for stability, comfort and the efficient use of both hands.

The principles of this position are:
sitting position, back straight, shoulders level,
the guitar rests on whichever thigh is on the neck side.
We raise the head of the guitar level with our head, with the aid of a footstool or of a support placed on the thigh.
The hand which plays the strings is placed over the sound hole, the elbow rests on the edge of the body of the guitar, level with the bridge.
The arm on the neck side is bent to bring the hand up to the height of the shoulder, the thumb is placed behind the neck, beneath the second fret and behind the third string, the fingers are over the strings.
Try to achieve relaxation, from the shoulders right down to the hands.
Finally, choose a chair of a height that allows your thigh to be horizontal, so that your guitar will be supported in a
stable manner. If your thigh is angled in one direction or the other, your guitar will slip and interfere with your playing.



To begin the course we will firstly look at, or relook at, pages 26 and 58 of volume D01.
- page 26 of volume D01 : Jean-François DELCAMP (1956) POLYPHONIE - Apoyando
- page 58 of volume D01 : Jean-François DELCAMP (1956) REST STROKE - APOYANDO
These exercises will work upon the technique of simultaneous rest strokes (apoyando) with the thumb and index finger, and also with the thumb and middle finger.
The rest stroke is a way to play the string with a finger movement which plucks the string and then continues to move until it comes to rest on the adjacent string. Working on this technique will allow you to discover the best position for your plucking hand (the right hand if you are right-handed).
If you are already used to plucking the strings with free strokes, the simultaneous rest strokes with the thumb and a finger will seem difficult to you, even impossible. But be assured, with patience and perseverence, this difficulty will be resolved in 30 minutes. I know from experience that the first tries are truly discouraging, particularly for adults. It is for this reason that I wish to reassure you in advance, take heart, you will be able to do it.

D01 p26 n1 - Delcamp Polyphonie - Apoyando


D01 p26 n2 - Delcamp Polyphonie - Apoyando


D01 p58 n15 Buté - Apoyando - Rest stroke


D01 p58 n16 Buté - Apoyando - Rest stroke




Once done, we will continue studying an exercise and 4 pieces, among the simplest in the volume D03.

- Page 86 Jean-François DELCAMP (1956) STRING DAMPING
These techniques are essential in polyphonic playing. Guitar playing is unique in that we must stop the resonances, in particular those of the open strings. Without these string damping techniques, polyphony is blurred by dissonance.

D03 p86 n1 - STRING DAMPING


D03 p86 n2 - STRING DAMPING


D03 p86 n3 - STRING DAMPING


D03 p86 n4 - STRING DAMPING


D03 p86 n5 - STRING DAMPING




- Page 8 Giorgio MAINERIO (1535-1582) SCHIARAZULA MARAZULA
This piece is a passemeze that uses two chords, those of A minor and G major. GWIN AR C'HALLAOUED in volume D03 is based on the same chords. Also in volume D03, BRIAN BORU'S MARCH is similarly based on these two chords.
The bass accompaniment is so simple and functional that I recommend it as a model for anyone who wants to begin working on improvisation.
To start work on improvisation, play the following bass part :
| A E | A E | A E | A E | G D | A E | G D | A E |
and use your free fingers to improvise over a melody over it.
First improvise a melody over the bass made up of whole notes (semibreves). When you've mastered the improvisation of a melody composed of whole notes, start using quarter notes (crotchets), which is more difficult. Finally improvise over the bass a melody made up of whole notes, quarter notes and eighth notes (quavers). We will not go any further in this third year course.

D03 p8 Giorgio MAINERIO - Schiarazula marazula


D03 p8 Improvisation 1 - Passemeze


D03 p8 Improvisation 2 - Passemeze


D03 p8 Improvisation 3 - Passemeze




- Page 9 Guillaume MORLAYE (1510?-1558?) GAILLARDE
Here William Morlaye constantly plays on the ambivalence in the pattern of accented beats. The rhythm is based at the same time on two measures in 3/8 time (ie 2 strong beats for a total of 6 eighth notes) and also on one long measure in 3/4 time (ie 3 strong beats for a total of 6 eighth notes). This practice, already common in the Renaissance, has been in constant use by composers right up to our own time. These changes in the rhythm are called hemiola. A hemiola refers to the insertion of a triple rhythm into a duple rhythm, or vice versa.

D03 p9 Guillaume MORLAYE - Gaillarde




- Page 45 Ferdinand CARULLI (1770-1841) ARPEGGI
Two simple pieces, perfect for an introduction to arpeggios. In these arpeggios, only your fingers move, be sure to keep your right hand in the same position.

D03 p45 Ferdinand CARULLI - Arpeggi di 3 note


D03 p45 Ferdinand CARULLI - Arpeggi di 4 note




- page 63 Mattéo CARCASSI (1792-1853) ANDANTINO opus 59
This andantino is a small masterpiece of brevity. For my part, I damp the resonance of the bass strings and I suggest you do the same. To damp the resonances, I rest my thumb on the string when I play with the index finger and I rest my index finger on the string when I play with the thumb, as in this video example.

D03 p63 exercice andantino


D03 p63 Mattéo CARCASSI -andantino opus 59




I ask you first to work on all these exercises and pieces for one week and then to post your recordings on the forum for:
- page 26 du volume D01 : Jean-François DELCAMP (1956) POLYPHONIE - Apoyando
- page 45 Ferdinand CARULLI (1770-1841) ARPEGGI
- page 8 Giorgio MAINERIO (1535-1582) SCHIARAZULA MARAZULA



Good luck!


I thank Geoff (GeoffB) who has helped in the translation of my lessons into English.


Jean-François

---

Exam qualifying submissions:

POLYPHONIE - Apoyando
ARPEGGI
SCHIARAZULA MARAZULA


Ken Kim
POLYPHONIE - Apoyando
ARPEGGI
SCHIARAZULA MARAZULA

Judy Verbeeten
POLYPHONIE - Apoyando
ARPEGGI
SCHIARAZULA MARAZULA

Satish Kumar
POLYPHONIE - Apoyando
ARPEGGI
SCHIARAZULA MARAZULA

Jules Wilkins
POLYPHONIE - Apoyando
ARPEGGI
SCHIARAZULA MARAZULA
:( + ♫ = :)

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Ken Kim
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Re: D03 Classical guitar lesson 01

Post by Ken Kim » Sun Sep 01, 2019 9:45 pm

Hello, D03 classmates.

I passed the exam of D01 and D02. I've been playing guitar for 26 months now.
This year will be very difficult and interesting for me to learn both D03 and D04. :chaud:
Here are my recordings except forGAILLARDE. I'm still working on GAILLARDE and it's hard ... :roll:

Any advice is welcome. :D




Ken

♫✥♫✥♫✥♫✥♫✥♫✥♫✥♫✥♫✥♫✥♫✥♫✥♫✥♫✥♫✥♫✥♫✥♫✥

Robert England Hauser / Amalio Burguet Especial
Cordoba C12SP, Torres & Rodriguez
Yamaha Silent SLG200NW / Ryoji Matsuoka M60

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Rick Beauregard
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Re: D03 Classical guitar lesson 01

Post by Rick Beauregard » Sun Sep 01, 2019 9:58 pm

You played these beautifully, Ken. If I wanted to be VERY picky I'd say watch your damping but there'll be plenty of time for that. The G string in the Carulli seemed to be sharp especially freeting the second fret. Open it was on't slightly so and not perceptible. But maybe you have ntonation issues with that guitar or that set of strings. The G is difficult to get just right. You have to check it at various frets and go for the best compromose.

Your position, RH, LH and tone are excellent! Congratulations on the first submittal of the new season!
All this time I thought I was making music; it was making me.
2015 Steve Ganz "Solidarity"
1980 Dauphin D30
1962 Fender pre-CBS P-Bass
National Triolian Uke ca.1930
Almost as many fly rods as guitars
_/) _/)
_/)

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Ken Kim
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Re: D03 Classical guitar lesson 01

Post by Ken Kim » Sun Sep 01, 2019 10:09 pm

Rick Beauregard wrote:
Sun Sep 01, 2019 9:58 pm
You played these beautifully, Ken. If I wanted to be VERY picky I'd say watch your damping but there'll be plenty of time for that. The G string in the Carulli seemed to be sharp especially freting the second fret. Open it was on't slightly so and not perceptible. But maybe you have intonation issues with that guitar or that set of strings. The G is difficult to get just right. You have to check it at various frets and go for the best compromose.

Your position, RH, LH and tone are excellent! Congratulations on the first submittal of the new season!
:merci: Thank you much for your observation, Rick.
I will keep that in mind about damping. :ouioui: Yes, G string had intonation problem with rectified treble set and now I changed to nylon again. :shock:
You have very sharp(trained) ears! :okok:
Ken

♫✥♫✥♫✥♫✥♫✥♫✥♫✥♫✥♫✥♫✥♫✥♫✥♫✥♫✥♫✥♫✥♫✥♫✥

Robert England Hauser / Amalio Burguet Especial
Cordoba C12SP, Torres & Rodriguez
Yamaha Silent SLG200NW / Ryoji Matsuoka M60

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Judy Verbeeten
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Re: D03 Classical guitar lesson 01

Post by Judy Verbeeten » Mon Sep 02, 2019 2:40 am

Ken Kim wrote:
Sun Sep 01, 2019 9:45 pm
Hello, D03 classmates.
Hi Ken, So glad we are back in the swing of things, and of course, off to a roaring start.

I am glad Rick reviewed your submission first, because as per usual, I really find it difficult to provide any advice vis-a-vis improving your playing. I know this will be a common theme throughout the year.

I do have a question though. I noticed that in this group of submissions and similarly for D04, you switch between a spruce-topped and cedar-topped guitar. Are you doing this to maintain familiarity with each guitar? Do you find it a bit awkward switching guitars, or is it pretty seamless?

Judy

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Judy Verbeeten
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Re: D03 Classical guitar lesson 01

Post by Judy Verbeeten » Mon Sep 02, 2019 2:46 am

It is always a challenge to post my submissions right after Ken has ... buy hey, I am used to it and Ken's submission always provide me with the gold standard that I can aspire to achieve.

In any case, here are my submissions for Lesson 01:










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Ken Kim
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Re: D03 Classical guitar lesson 01

Post by Ken Kim » Mon Sep 02, 2019 3:28 am

Judy Verbeeten wrote:
Mon Sep 02, 2019 2:46 am
It is always a challenge to post my submissions right after Ken has ...
:bravo:, Judy.
You are progressing well and I can see you have done quite a lot of practice. :shock:

Although your right hand position definitely got better than before, I still would suggest your wrist at least 1" more away from soundboard.(Just for free stroke) :mrgreen:

However, big congratulations on your playability. It seems you are evolving than progressing. :okok:

Now, we have 2 tutors here in English forum. I wish they can help you better than me. :discussion:

About recording with different guitars. All my guitars have diffrent sounds. I have 8 guitars and none of them sound similar because they have different bracing pattern on soundboard. Playability isn't seamingless but I got used to play different scales of guitar. It isn't big deal any more. IMO, cedar top sounds more warmer and richer than Spruce top and spruce top sounds balder bass with defined treble. I prefer spruce top tho. :bye:
Ken

♫✥♫✥♫✥♫✥♫✥♫✥♫✥♫✥♫✥♫✥♫✥♫✥♫✥♫✥♫✥♫✥♫✥♫✥

Robert England Hauser / Amalio Burguet Especial
Cordoba C12SP, Torres & Rodriguez
Yamaha Silent SLG200NW / Ryoji Matsuoka M60

Sathish Kumar
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Re: D03 Classical guitar lesson 01

Post by Sathish Kumar » Mon Sep 02, 2019 7:36 am

Ken and Judy, Great playing both of you. I have enrolled for D03 directly this year. I have been playing/learning on my own for a while now and look forward to joining you guys soon. It is going to take a week or so to come up to speed and upload my recordings.

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Judy Verbeeten
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Re: D03 Classical guitar lesson 01

Post by Judy Verbeeten » Mon Sep 02, 2019 11:51 am

Sathish Kumar wrote:
Mon Sep 02, 2019 7:36 am
I have enrolled for D03 directly this year.
Sathish, I am so glad to hear that you have joined the D03 group. Our D02 group was quite small last year (on the English board) and so it is always great to have new recruits.

Judy

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Ken Kim
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Re: D03 Classical guitar lesson 01

Post by Ken Kim » Mon Sep 02, 2019 12:25 pm

Sathish Kumar wrote:
Mon Sep 02, 2019 7:36 am
Ken and Judy, Great playing both of you. I have enrolled for D03 directly this year. I have been playing/learning on my own for a while now and look forward to joining you guys soon. It is going to take a week or so to come up to speed and upload my recordings.
Welcome to D03, Sathish. :bye:

You can post your recordings anytime you want. I look forward to seeing your recordings. :ouioui:
Ken

♫✥♫✥♫✥♫✥♫✥♫✥♫✥♫✥♫✥♫✥♫✥♫✥♫✥♫✥♫✥♫✥♫✥♫✥

Robert England Hauser / Amalio Burguet Especial
Cordoba C12SP, Torres & Rodriguez
Yamaha Silent SLG200NW / Ryoji Matsuoka M60

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Rick Beauregard
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Re: D03 Classical guitar lesson 01

Post by Rick Beauregard » Mon Sep 02, 2019 6:43 pm

Wow you guys are fast! I got criticized in D06 on the Spanish forum for posting less than exactly 7 days after the lesson was posted.They apparently are more sticklers for the "rules" over there. Actually that is not a "rule" so don't worry. For my first piece (Grand Vals) this year, I am at least one maybe two months away from posting anything reasonable. :chaud:

Judy very nicely done. I agree with Ken on the hand position. I notice on one of the exercisee you move your hand a bit to play the rest stroke with the index. Movement is OK, but not as a habit, as an intention (say to get that Segovia sound for example). Better to foster quiet hands in these exercises. Hand position might help that.
All this time I thought I was making music; it was making me.
2015 Steve Ganz "Solidarity"
1980 Dauphin D30
1962 Fender pre-CBS P-Bass
National Triolian Uke ca.1930
Almost as many fly rods as guitars
_/) _/)
_/)

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Judy Verbeeten
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Re: D03 Classical guitar lesson 01

Post by Judy Verbeeten » Mon Sep 02, 2019 7:34 pm

Thank you Rick and Ken for the feedback. My RH has been an ongoing issue,no doubt. It is important to be reminded of this important issue - to keep me in line, or more accurately, to keep me arched. I really appreciate the feedback and your reviewing my submission so carefully.

But I must say, that on the recording (I guess it is the angle), I feel that my RH looks a lot flatter than it is. But definitely, I have to work on this very important issue. Thank you again.

Judy

Jules Wilkins
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Re: D03 Classical guitar lesson 01

Post by Jules Wilkins » Tue Sep 03, 2019 3:41 am

Judy Verbeeten wrote:
Mon Sep 02, 2019 2:46 am
It is always a challenge to post my submissions right after Ken has ... buy hey, I am used to it and Ken's submission always provide me with the gold standard that I can aspire to achieve.

In any case, here are my submissions for Lesson 01:


Hello Judy:
You are right about Ken...hard for us to find something useful to suggest. I think I can however offer something constructive with your submissions.
Actually, after listening to your submissions in order (bearing in mind that I have never heard you play before) I was surprised at how well you did on the last two pieces. It is clear that you spent a great deal more time on them than you did on the exercises. That is understandable, because the exercises are B O R I N G ! :x . When I play them and my wife is in the room I apologize for my incessant repeating of a single measure of something that isn't even musical. The pieces are a lot more fun.
The trouble with this is that until we can perform the exercises flawlessly we will never be able to perform the pieces with the level of skill that we ought to demand of ourselves.
So I encourage you to return to those first two exercises and spend several hours on them, paying attention to the following:
1) Make certain the every base note played is a definite rest stroke. Some of your strokes meet that goal, but others appear to me more of a free stroke. Rest stroke with the thumb is I think the most difficult of the four possible strokes (rest and free with fingers and thumb) to master, but master this stroke is necessary.
2) where you have previously played a lower string (which should still be sounding), make sure your thumb bounces off the rest stroke string to dampen the lower one. In other words, you still play a rest stroke, but you use that string as a spring board to dampen the lower string. Again, hugely difficult, but if we cannot do in in these exercises we cannot hope to do it in a piece. We need this skill to become automatic. It is not automatic with me so I keep coming back to these base exercises. This is the only way that it will become automatic and effortless in a piece.
3) Pay attention to the timing. For example, in the first exercise you give the two quarter notes the same amount of time as the half notes. It is important to read the music as you play and to be true to the beat. You make similar errors in the second piece.

If you can do this, your actual pieces will improve, and given that they already are not bad at all I am confident that you will be amazed at your progress.

Hope this helps. I have yet to start on the pieces but I will start tonight.

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Judy Verbeeten
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Re: D03 Classical guitar lesson 01

Post by Judy Verbeeten » Tue Sep 03, 2019 8:06 am

Jules, thank you for taking the time to review my submissions so carefully. Your feedback is well-appreciated. I will definitely reevaluate those exercises and incorporate your recommendations. Thank you again.

Judy

RossMoran
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Re: D03 Classical guitar lesson 01

Post by RossMoran » Wed Sep 04, 2019 9:36 am

Hello all! I'm new to the courses and will post my first videos in due course....

You guys are super fast and way ahead of the curve!

Judy and Ken- great playing, keep up the good work!

peace love and good happiness stuff, Ross x

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